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Boyle County Kentucky Historical Markers

 
"Uncle" Charlie Moran Marker - other side image, Touch for more information
By Tom Bosse, July 4, 2018
"Uncle" Charlie Moran Marker - other side
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 1091 — "Uncle" Charlie Moran
Colorful college football coach and National Baseball League umpire. Coached Praying Colonels of Centre College into national football spotlight, 1916-23. See other side. First coached, 1898-99, at Bethel College, Russellville, Ky. Then held four . . . — Map (db m121575) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 1958 — African American Business District - Doric Lodge No. 18 (F. & A.M.-P.H.A.)
In this block a thriving African American business district stood for over 100 years. Restaurants, barber and beauty shops, medical and dental offices, and retail shops drew patrons from Boyle and nearby counties. Until razed by urban renewal in . . . — Map (db m49741) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Alban Gilpin Smith Goldsmith1795 - 1876
Native of Delaware. Trained in medicine and surgery under E. McDowell, lived in this house 1825-30. He performed the 3rd ovariotomy in the U.S. (1823), was the first to perform laminectomy (1829), and was an innovative contributor to urologic . . . — Map (db m121537) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — American Revolution Memorial
To honor and commemorate the men who fought in the American Revolution and sleep in Boyle County Kentucky.

John Spears • Michael Harmon • Hugh Shiell • John Pipes • John Gray • William Warren • Samuel McDowell • Thomas . . . — Map (db m121869) WM

Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Boyle County Veterans Memorial
Dedicated to those men and women of this community who served our country in times of peace and war and especially to those who gave their lives in that service.

World War I Ball, Basil • Jesse, Frank H. • Bramer, George S. • . . . — Map (db m121870) WM

Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Brick Schoolhouse
This one-story brick building, originally only two rooms, was the first brick schoolhouse in Danville. The schoolhouse, circa 1820, was renovated in 1975. — Map (db m121729) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 1328 — Capt. George Givens
Homesite and grave 1 mile west. B., Orange Co., Va., 1740. D., 1825. 40 years service to his country. Lt. at Fort Pitt, Dunmore's War, 1774. Captain, Botetourt County militia, 1776. Northwest Campaign of George Rogers Clark, 1778. Came to Ky., 1781. . . . — Map (db m120112) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 923 — Centre College
Founded on this campus in 1819 by pioneer Kentuckians who held that heart and mind must be trained together, and dedicated to the inculcation of ideals of culture and character in the hearts of American youth. Veritas Lux Mentis. — Map (db m121562) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 1140 — Clark's Station
Early pioneer settlement erected before 1779. Developed by George Clark, brother-in-law of William Whitley, whose party came to Ky. about 1775. Located on Clark's Run Creek, named for George Clark, it was one of the first stations built in the . . . — Map (db m105411) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 1218 — County Named, 1842
For Judge John Boyle, 1774-1834. State representative, 1800; U.S. Congress, 1803-9; Kentucky Court of Appeals, Chief Justice, 1810-26; U.S. District Judge for Kentucky, 1826-34. The Judge "lived for his country," setting many important legal . . . — Map (db m121555) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Courthouse
The original log courthouse, which was built on this site in 1784-1785, housed the Supreme Court of Kentucky and the Constitutional Conventions which led to Kentucky's statehood on June 1, 1792. This replica was erected in 1942. — Map (db m121535) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 756 — Courthouse a Hospital
Boyle County's first courthouse erected here, 1842, destroyed by great fire of 1860. This building completed 1862. First occupied by Union forces as hospital after battle of Perryville, October 8, 1862. On 11th a Union force drove CSA from . . . — Map (db m121556) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Dr. Ephraim McDowell House
McDowell House And Apothecary Shop The pioneering spirit of Dr. Ephraim McDowell-father of abdominal surgery and most prominent surgeon west of the Alleghenies in the early 19th century-is celebrated today at McDowell House. On Christmas . . . — Map (db m71041) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 2281 — Dr. Ephraim McDowell, 1771-1830/McDowell-Crawford Surgery
Burial site of Ephraim McDowell, the “father of modern surgery.” His family moved here from Va. in 1784. He studied medicine in Va. and Scotland before practicing in Danville. In 1802, he married Sarah Shelby, dau. of Ky.’s first gov. . . . — Map (db m50814) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 2284 — Ephraim McDowell House
Obverse Home of Ephraim McDowell, the “father of modern surgery.” Here on December 25, 1809, McDowell performed the first successful abdominal operation when he took a 22-pound ovarian cyst from Jane Todd Crawford of Green . . . — Map (db m71047) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 1279 — First Crop / Hemp in Kentucky
Kentucky's first recorded hemp crop, 1775, was on Clark's Run Creek, near Danville. Grown by Archibald McNeill, who brought the first seed with him when he located here. Hemp production spread slowly throughout the area, but Boyle County later . . . — Map (db m121560) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — First Post Office
This building is the original First Post Office west of the Allegheny Mountains. General Thomas Barbee commissioned first Post Master, August 20, 1792. Logs moved from Walnut Street to Constitution Square. Dedicated to the State of Kentucky by the . . . — Map (db m121725) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 2388 — First USCT Recruits at Camp Nelson
May 23, 1864, nearly 250 black men, most of them slaves, left Boyle Co. to march to Camp Nelson in Jessamine Co. to enlist in the Union army. On the way, some Danville citizens threw stones and shot pistols at the recruits. When they reached . . . — Map (db m70996) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Fisher’s Row
Fisher’s Row, circa 1816-1817, was built by Jeremiah Fisher as the first rental property in Danville. Fisher’s row consists of two, two-story houses with a common wall. The brick is laid in the Flemish Bond Pattern. — Map (db m121727) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 1909 — Fisher's Garrison
Stephen Albert Fisher, Rev. War soldier from Va., assigned in 1775 to active duty and wounded while serving with Colonel John Bowman's militia. Returned to Ky. in 1779 with wife Mary Magdalene Garr. He established garrison of military significance . . . — Map (db m70981) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Grayson’s Tavern
Grayson’s Tavern, circa 1785, was owned and operated by Benjamin Grayson as the first tavern in Danville. The political club of Danville, formed in 1786, met here frequently to discuss issues which formed the framework of the Kentucky Constitution. — Map (db m121730) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 755 — Grayson's Tavern
Danville's first tavern, operated in this building before 1800 by Benjamin Grayson. Often within these walls the burning political issues of the day were discussed. The Danville Political Society, organized in 1786 and the first of its kind in the . . . — Map (db m49742) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Isaac Shelby1750-1826
First governor of Kentucky 1792-1796

Fifth governor of Kentucky 1812-1816

One of Shelby’s first acts as Governor was to call for and help design the Great Seal of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The figures of a pioneer and statesman in . . . — Map (db m121734) HM

Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 2005 — Jacobs Hall / John A. Jacobs, Sr. (1806-69)
Kentucky School for the Deaf first opened 1823 in Danville, at 4th and Main Sts. In 1826, it moved to this campus. Jacobs Hall is oldest surviving building, constructed 1855-57, of Italianate design by architect Thomas Lewinski. Its interior is . . . — Map (db m121561) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Jail
In 1785, the District of Kentucky ordered the construction of a jail, “to be constructed of 9-inch logs”. This replica of the jail was built in 1942. — Map (db m121731) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — John Gill Weisiger Memorial Park
Obverse John Gill Weisiger Memorial Park The land embraced within this park, bounded by Main Street, First Street, Walnut Street and alleyway, was conveyed to the commonwealth of Kentucky as a gift by Miss Emma Weisiger, and . . . — Map (db m71338) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 1606 — John Marshall Harlan / Kentucky's "Great Dissenter"(1833-1911)
Born in Boyle Co. and a graduate of Centre College, 1850, Harlan practiced law in central Ky. after 1853. Although against Lincoln and abolition in 1860, he was a strong Unionist during Civil War; recruited 10th Ky. Infantry. Elected Attorney . . . — Map (db m121559) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 2244 — John Todd Stuart, 1807-1885
Abraham Lincoln’s friend and 1st law partner was born on Nov. 10, 1807, in Fayette Co. The son of a Presbyterian minister & Mary Todd Lincoln’s aunt, Stuart graduated from Centre College in 1826. Two years later he became a lawyer in Springfield, . . . — Map (db m49746) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 2186 — John William Bate(1855~1945)
Side 1 Original site of Bate High School, built 1912 and named in honor of its founder, John William Bate. Born a slave in Louisville, Bate received an AB from Berea College in 1881 and and AM in 1891. He moved to Danville to teach in 1881 . . . — Map (db m105414) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 2216 — Lewis and Clark in Kentucky - Danville
In December 1806, William Clark, coleader of the Lewis and Clark Expedition to the Pacific Ocean, visited his nephews in school in Danville. Clark was en route to Washington to report to President Jefferson and other government officials about the . . . — Map (db m49744) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Meeting House
The original log meeting house, erected on this site in 1784 under the direction of reverend David Rice, housed the newly formed Concord Presbyterian Congregation, the first Presbyterians in Kentucky. This replica was erected in 1942. — Map (db m121733) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 1376 — Old Crow Inn / John Crow
Old Crow Inn The oldest existing stone house in Kentucky, built 1784, is part of this building. The house has been enlarged and Doric pillars added. Land purchased from John Crow by James Wright, 1781. Next owner, Colonel Joshua Barbee, who . . . — Map (db m105413) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 24 — Poet, Lawyer and Soldier / Theodore O'Hara
(side 1) Poet, Lawyer and Soldier Theodore O'Hara was born in this city, Feb. 11, 1820. He read law with Judge Wm. Owsley. Newspaper work included editing Frankfort Yeoman and Louisville Times. He served in Mexican War, . . . — Map (db m121558) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Post Office
This original building built pre-1792, served as the first office west of the Alleghenies. On August 20, 1792, Thomas Barbee was commissioned postmaster. The first mail was received on November 3, 1792. The post office was moved here from its . . . — Map (db m121726) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 754, 130 — Presbyterian ChurchAmerican Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site
One of three founded, 1784, by Reverend David Rice; earliest of this denomination west of Alleghenies. Here worshipped: James G. Birney, whose presidential candidacy in 1844 caused defeat of Henry Clay; John C. Breckinridge, whose 1860 candidacy . . . — Map (db m121839) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 197 — School for the Deaf
On this corner, in 1823, Kentucky founded the first state-supported school in the United States for the instruction of deaf children. Classes met in an old inn that was known as the Yellow House. Reverend and Mrs. John R. Kerr served as first . . . — Map (db m121541) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 2508 — Sinking Spring
Referred to by geologists as a “karst window”, sinking springs form when bedrock has collapsed to reveal groundwater moving through an aquifer. Water flows from the spring, creates a surface-flowing stream, and returns underground. This . . . — Map (db m121572) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 49 — Site of Log Courthouse
Kentucky District Court sessions held here March 14, 1785, until Court of Appeals set up in 1792. Created by Virginia statute on May 6, 1782, the court first met in Harrodsburg on March 3, 1783. Later meetings at Low Dutch Station and John Crow's . . . — Map (db m121534) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 1442 — Trinity Episcopal Church
One of the oldest church buildings in Danville. Erected in 1830 after Trinity parish founded in 1829. Rebuilt on the original walls following fire which swept central part of town, 1860. James Birney and Ephraim McDowell members of first vestry. In . . . — Map (db m121539) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 190 — Walker Daniel
Founded Danville, 1781. First Atty. Gen. of Ky. District, 1783. As a member of Commission went to Falls of Ohio to allot lands in Clark's grant to members of Ill. Regt. Daniel was killed by Indians, Aug. 1784, on way to visit brother at Bullitt's . . . — Map (db m49743) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — Watts-Bell House
The Watts-Bell House circa 1816-1817, was built by William Watts for leading Danville merchant David Bell. Joshua Fry Bell, grandson of David Bell, grew up in this house. He became a distinguished lawyer and statesman, serving as a member of the . . . — Map (db m121728) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Danville — 2386 — Willis Russell House / Craddock and Tardiveau
Willis Russell, a well-educated & emancipated slave of Rev. War captain Robert Craddock, relocated from Warren Co., Ky. to Danville around April 1838. He taught black children in this pre-1795 log home that he inherited when Capt. Craddock died in . . . — Map (db m121564) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Junction City — 2233 — Traveler's Rest
Isaac Shelby, 1st & 5th governor, came to Ky. as a surveyor in 1775. He claimed 1400 acres in 1776 by raising a crop of corn. In 1779 he received 1st land settlement & premption deed granted by Va. Land Commission. His home, Traveler's Rest, . . . — Map (db m120115) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Junction City — 95 — Traveler's Rest
. . . — Map (db m120116) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — “For God’s Sake, Save That Battery” The 38th Indiana at PerryvillePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The 436 members of the 38th Indiana Infantry Regiment deployed here, in a cut cornfield, next to the 10th Wisconsin Infantry. These men supported Captain Peter Simonson’s six cannon, which were located to your right. It was a crucial position; along . . . — Map (db m46482) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — “If You Meet the Enemy, Overpower Him”Perryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
About 4 PM on October 8, Colonel Samuel Powell was ordered to move his brigade westward and discover how many Federal troops were stationed west of Perryville. His 1,000-man force dutifully advanced along the Springfield Pike (today US 150 and 4th . . . — Map (db m46416) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 80th IndianaPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The inexperienced 80th Indiana Infantry Regiment was part of Union Colonel George Webster’s brigade. This unit included the 50th, 98th, and 121st Ohio infantry regiments and the 19th Battery, Indiana Light Artillery, commanded by Captain Samuel . . . — Map (db m88692) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 9-A — Act of MercyPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The Battle of Perryville was a fierce fight for the members of the 79th Pennsylvania Infantry. Fighting in these fields, this unit suffered 40 killed, 146 wounded, and 30 missing. This represents a loss of more than fifty percent of the . . . — Map (db m46476) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Army of the OhioMajor General Don Carlos Buell
First Army Corps Major General Alexander McD McCook Tenth Division Brigadier General James S. Jackson Thirty-Third Brigade Brigadier General William R. Terrill 80th, 123rd Illinois and 105th Ohio Infantry Regiments and detachments . . . — Map (db m21467) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Artillery Duel at Loomis HeightsPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Before the Confederate infantry attacked, the Southern army tried to weaken the Federal position by bombarding the Union lines with artillery fire. At noon, Captain William Carnes’ Confederate artillery battery took up position on one of the far . . . — Map (db m46487) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Assault from the Bottom HousePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
They were outnumbered, but they were ready. Watching from the top of the hill across the road, members of the 3rd Ohio Infantry Regiment saw waves of attacking Confederate infantry moving toward them. These Federal soldiers, anchoring the southern . . . — Map (db m46491) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Assault on Parsons’ RidgePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Maney’s Confederates immediately discovered the lethal danger of attacking the eight Union cannon on top of the ridge in front of you. The Confederates sought cover behind a split-rail fence, but the Union artillery shattered the rails, killing and . . . — Map (db m46469) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Baptism of FirePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The 500 soldiers of the 42nd Indiana were suffering from an intense thirst. Their canteens dry from a recent drought, the commanders allowed these troops to find pools of water in Doctor's Creek, located just in front of you. The men stacked . . . — Map (db m88475) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 58 — Battle of Perryville
October 8, 1862 Here 16,000 Confederates under General Braxton Bragg fought 22,000 Federals under General Don Carlos Buell. Bragg, facing superior forces, withdrew.Union casualties 4211; Confederate, 3396. — Map (db m5193) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 553 — Battle of PerryvilleOctober 8, 1862
(left panel) The battle was brought on by Confederate Lieut. Gen. Braxton Bragg as a delaying action to insure safe withdrawal of a huge wagon train of supplies and to enable him to effect a junction with the army of Maj. Gen. E. Kirby . . . — Map (db m46239) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 58 — Battle of PerryvilleOctober 8, 1862
Here 16,000 Confederates under General Braxton Bragg fought 22,000 Federals under General Don Carlos Buell. Bragg, facing superior forces, withdrew. Union casualties, 4211; Confederate, 3396. — Map (db m55026) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 58 — Battle of Perryville
October 8, 1862. Here 16,000 Confederates under General Braxton Bragg fought 22,000 Federals under General Don Carlos Buell. Bragg, facing superior forces, withdrew, Union casualties, 4211; Confederate, 3396. — Map (db m68552) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 192 — Bottom House
Owned by Squire H. P. Bottom, it was a key position in Battle of Perryville, Oct. 8, 1862. At the beginning of battle, held by USA troops. After a massed attack, Confederates took the house and held it. The battle over, Bottom identified and buried . . . — Map (db m21422) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Bragg's Invasion of Kentucky
The Confederate Army’s advance into Kentucky in 1862 was initiated to relieve Tennessee of Union control, to align the help of dissatisfied Kentuckians and to gain access to the rich supplies Kentucky offered. General Kirby Smith entered . . . — Map (db m46404) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 20 — Cleburne's AdvancePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Forced back from the hills above Doctor's Creek, the Union soldiers retreated to this position. Their lines were in chaos - regiments intermingled, the wounded were left behind and some panicked troops raced for the rear. Most soldiers, however, . . . — Map (db m88483) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Confederate CemeteryPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
When the Battle of Perryville ended, hundreds of dead soldiers were left on the battlefield. The Confederates, who attacked the Union battle lines, lost 532 killed, 2,641 wounded, and 228 missing (3,401 total). Federal losses were just as . . . — Map (db m46421) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 193 — Crawford House
Used by Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg as headquarters during the Battle of Perryville, Oct. 8, 1862. Crawford Spring, back of the house, furnished vital water supply to CSA troops on the drought stricken battlefield. — Map (db m46248) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 965 — Crawford Springs
As Confederate and Union armies converged over to the west the day and night before great Battle of Perryville, Oct. 8, 1862, there was constant fighting for water. Almost unprecedented drought had made water so scarce that troops contended for . . . — Map (db m68319) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Defense of Loomis’ HeightsPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
In 1862, the ravine in front of you was planted in corn, the fields recently cut and harvested. Here, on this ridge, the Union soldiers established a strong defensive position. Two brigades and six cannon awaited the Confederate attack. With a . . . — Map (db m46485) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Defense of Parsons’ RidgePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Union Brigadier General William Terrill was nearly panic-stricken. To his surprise, thousands of Confederates swarmed over the fields in front of you, moving toward the Federal lines. The shouts of attacking Southern troops and the crescendo of . . . — Map (db m46470) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Defense of Parsons’ RidgePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
As Maney’s Confederates reached the top of this hill they watched the fleeing Union soldiers retreat into the valley in front of you. The Southerners had lost hundreds of men killed and wounded during the fight to take this ridge, and their hearts . . . — Map (db m46471) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 24 — Dixville CrossroadsPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
During the Battle of Perryville, the Dixville Crossroads, the intersection in front of you, was a crucial tactical point on the battlefield. Here, the Benton Road (now called Whites Road), which runs to Dixville in Mercer County, intersects the . . . — Map (db m46492) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Donelson PersistsPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
When Donelson’s shattered regiments reached this position, nearly half of his men had been killed and wounded. Despite the appalling casualties, the Confederate attack continued to the west. With Donelson’s 16th Tennessee Infantry Regiment . . . — Map (db m46480) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Donelson's AdvancePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
When Donelson’s brigade moved into this valley, they were met with a deadly surprise. The rolling terrain had prevented the Confederates from seeing all of the Union troop positions. When the Confederates reached this valley, they became trapped in . . . — Map (db m46481) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Donelson's AttackPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Confederate Brigadier General Daniel Donelson had been given great responsibility. His brigade was to open the Confederate attack by assaulting the northern end of the Union defensive line. Once Donelson’s brigade moved forward, other Southern . . . — Map (db m46430) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — First Settlement of PerryvillePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The area around this cave was the site of Perryville’s original settlement, Harbison’s Station. Named for its founder, James Harbison, the station was settled in the 1770s. Harbison and the group of Virginians traveling with him chose this location . . . — Map (db m46419) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 23 — General Polk Behind Enemy LinesPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
After capturing Union Captain Samuel Harris' artillery battery, located behind you, Confederate troops led by Brigadier General St. John r. Liddell moved to this area to support other advancing Southern units. Night was falling, and , as . . . — Map (db m88694) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 23 — Harris' BatteryPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Before the entire Union First Corps (numbering nearly 15,000 men) arrived on the field, this location marked the extreme left, or northern end, of the Union battle line. Six cannon commanded by Union Captain Samuel J. Harris were placed at this . . . — Map (db m88690) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Illinois Soldiers at Perryville
The Fifty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, commanded by Maj. Joshua Winters, here suffered 113 casualties of 325 engaged. The Seventy-fifth Illinois, Lieut. Col. John E. Bennett, lost 225 of 700. Serving with Col. Michael Gooding's Thirteenth Brigade, the . . . — Map (db m46356) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — IntroductionPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The Battle of Perryville In the summer of 1862, Confederate General Braxton Bragg’s Army of the Mississippi invaded Kentucky. Bragg hoped to enlist recruits, pull Union troops out of Tennessee, and hold Kentucky for the Confederacy. With . . . — Map (db m46422) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 876 — Karrick-Parks House / Harberson's Station
(obverse) Karrick-Parks House Bivouac for Confederate troops on Oct. 7, 1862, night before Battle of Perryville. Karricks ordered to vacate home the next day. Day after the battle they returned to survey damage, found little done. . . . — Map (db m46396) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 2391 — Kirkland Home
Near here was the home of Charles King and Caroline Purdom Kirkland. To escape the Battle of Perryville, they traveled with their 3 young children 10 miles south to the home of Caroline’s father in Forkland. When they returned a few days later, they . . . — Map (db m68320) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Lumsden's Battery
The scene must have been spectacular to the members of Captain Charles Lumsden's artillery battery. Rolling their four cannon up to this hill to support the attacking Confederate infantry, the Southern cannoneers beheld the Union line that stretched . . . — Map (db m63361) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Maney's AttackPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Confederate Brigadier General George Maney was growing concerned. On the hill to your front, eight Union cannon blasted away, killing and wounding dozens of Southern soldiers. Maney knew that his brigade had to take the hill and quickly silence . . . — Map (db m46467) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 2223 — Merchants' Row / Street Fighting
(obverse) Merchants' Row Originally known as Main St., the town's historic commercial center renamed Buell St. to honor Union general D.C. Buell. Now called Merchants' Row, most buildings built 1830-40. Temperance leader Carrie . . . — Map (db m46399) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — S555C — Michigan at Perryville
(side 1) Among the 61,000 Union soldiers who at the Battle of Perryville ended Confederate attempts to gain control of Kentucky were six Michigan units. The most heavily engaged of these were Coldwater’s Loomis Battery (Battery A of the . . . — Map (db m46357) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — On this Spot Brig. Gen. James S. Jackson Fell
Gen. Jackson was born in Fayette Co., Ky. 1823, died Perryville, Oct. 8, 1862. Graduated Jefferson College, Canonsburg, Penn. and Transylvania University. Lawyer, Hopkinsville. Lieutenant 1st, Ky. Cavalry, Mexican War. Member of Congress, 1861, . . . — Map (db m126627) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Perryvile and the Emancipation Proclamation
In mid-1862, President Abraham Lincoln wrestled with the idea of issuing the Emancipation Proclamation. With Confederate armies pressing into Maryland and Kentucky, Lincoln realized that he could not issue the Proclamation until the Union secured a . . . — Map (db m46363) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 1284 — Perryville
Established as Harberson's Fort before 1783 by James Harberson, Thomas Walker, Daniel Ewing and others at the crossroads of Danville-Louisville and Harrodsburg-Nashville routes. Town laid out by Edward Bullock and William Hall, 1815, named for . . . — Map (db m46400) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Perryville Battlefield
Perryville Battlefield has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark Under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935 this site possesses exceptional value in commemorating and illustrating the history of the United . . . — Map (db m21450) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Perryville Confederate Memorial
(front, south) Confederate Memorial Nor braver bled for a brighter land, no brighter land had a cause so grand. (side, east) On flames eternal camping ground their tents are spread. And glory guards with solemn round . . . — Map (db m68664) WM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Perryville in the Crucible of WarPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
As the Union and Confederate armies deployed around Perryville on October 7 and 8, the city’s inhabitants found themselves caught in the middle. Many residents fled the town in haste, taking whatever belongings they could collect. Other civilians . . . — Map (db m46417) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 194 — Russell House
On the knoll, it was a key position on the Union left flank under Maj. Gen. McCook in Battle of Perryville, Oct. 8, 1862. The scene of desperate fighting, it changed hands twice and was hit many times. After the battle it was used as a hospital. — Map (db m46355) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — SanctuaryPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
As fighting raged, Union soldiers in Brigadier General William Terrill’s brigade were driven from the ridge and the split rail fence in front of you. Most of these troops had never been in combat. This inexperience sometimes led men and officers to . . . — Map (db m46484) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Sgt. Harris B. Cope Memorial
(base) Dedicated to the memory of Sgt. Harris B. Cope Company G 16th Tennessee Infantry who fell in the fields ahead October 8, 1862 (top) Donelson’s Brigade The brigade of Brig. Gen. Daniel S. Donelson . . . — Map (db m46420) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 17 — Simonson’s BatteryPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The six guns of Union Captain Peter Simonson’s 5th Battery, Indiana Light Artillery were posted on this ridge. These Hoosiers had a commanding view of the Confederate advance, and their battery anchored the center of the Union battle line. . . . — Map (db m46486) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 2399 — Site of First Rural Electric Co-Op Substation in County
W. H. Rogers, president of Inter-County R.E.C.C., threw the switch at the Perryville substation on June 10, 1938, to energize 56 miles of line to 115 homes. In 2013, on the 75th anniversary of this event, Inter-County Energy served more than 25,000 . . . — Map (db m68402) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Soldiers' Reaction to Lincoln's Emancipation
Whether a soldier was Union or Confederate in his loyalties during the Civil War, there was not a unified reaction to Abraham Lincoln’s preliminary or official Emancipation Proclamation. The individual reaction varied on either side of this . . . — Map (db m46364) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Squire Henry P. Bottom
. . . — Map (db m88466) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Starkweather’s HillPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Their faces and hands begrimed from the smoke of battle, and their ears ringing with the constant ripping of musketry, Starkweather’s shattered brigade retreated to the ridge in front of you. They had saved several cannon, pushing them back to a new . . . — Map (db m46473) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Starkweather's HillPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
As Union Colonel John Starkweather stood on this hill, watching Terrill’s brigade retreat, he realized the importance of his position. With its twelve cannon, Starkweather’s brigade stood as the only Federal defense between the attacking . . . — Map (db m46475) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Stewart's AdvancePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The battle opened with great fury. To your left, Donelson's brigade hurled themselves against the Union lines, but their attack momentarily stalled. In the fields to your right, Maney's Confederate brigade also assaulted the Federal position. . . . — Map (db m46432) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Stewart's AttackPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
Wedged between Donelson’s and Maney’s brigades, Stewart’s Confederates continued their advance. Two Union infantry regiments initially held this area, but Stewart’s attack hurled them back. There was more work to be done. From the second ridge . . . — Map (db m46478) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — The 15th Kentucky Infantry (US)Perryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
On the ridge to your right front and across the paved road fought the 15th Kentucky Infantry (US). The 15th was recruited in the fall of 1861 from northern Kentucky and the Louisville area. At Perryville the regiment (part of Colonel William Lytle’s . . . — Map (db m46490) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — The Battle of Perryville
The battle which climaxed the major Confederate invasion of Kentucky was fought on these hills west of Perryville. A sharp clash occurred on October 7 in order to gain possession of the only water supply in the vicinity. The opposing armies . . . — Map (db m21474) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — The Battle of Perryville
The Battle of Perryville was fought on October 8, 1862. It was the climax of a campaign that lasted almost two months and affected the entire state of Kentucky. The campaign started when Edmund Kirby Smith’s Confederate army entered Kentucky on . . . — Map (db m46372) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — The City of PerryvillePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
The area that became Perryville was first settled between 1776 and 1780 by a group of Virginians led by James Harbison. The settlement became known as Harbison’s Station, and a stockade was built around a cave that exists today behind 403 South . . . — Map (db m46415) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — The CornfieldPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
During the Battle of Perryville, a field of ten-foot high cornstalks, brown and dry from a severe drought, covered this valley. Obscured among the corn, 800 members of the 21st Wisconsin Infantry Regiment waited. In the army for less than a month, . . . — Map (db m46472) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — The Dye HousePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
In 1860, a forty-three year-old farmer named John Dye lived here with his wife, Elizabeth, their four children, and six slaves. The 120-acre farm produced hay, corn, and wheat, and the family also had a few cows, horses, and mules. Two years . . . — Map (db m46405) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 19 — The H. P. Bottom HousePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
During the battle, more than 7,500 soldiers were killed or wounded. The town's 300 inhabitants were left to bury the dead, care for the injured, and repair their homes after months of post-battle occupation. Perhaps no civilian suffered more . . . — Map (db m88472) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — 5b — Turner's BatteryPerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
When General Maney’s Confederates attacked the Union left flank, located on the ridge in front of you, a Confederate artillery battery commanded by Lieutenant William Turner took position here. To support Maney’s advance, Tuner’s four cannon rained . . . — Map (db m46468) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Union Monument
To the valiant soldiers of the Army of the United States, who bravely and heroically fell in the Battle of Perryville October 8, 1862. This monument in grateful memory of their loyal service and noble sacrifice has been erected by the reunited . . . — Map (db m21465) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Webster's BrigadePerryville — The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862
In these fields, a Union brigade commanded by Colonel George Penny Webster supported the main Union battle line. Webster's troops, numbering more than 3,000 men from Ohio and Indiana, were new soldiers who would soon experience the horrors of . . . — Map (db m88695) HM
Kentucky (Boyle County), Perryville — Widow Gibson Cabin
In 1862, the widow Mary Jane Gibson and her children lived here in a small cabin. The Gibsons were poor tenant farmers who scratched out a living on land owned by Henry Bottom, their first cousin. On October 8, the household was spun into confusion . . . — Map (db m63354) HM

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