Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Coffee County Tennessee Historical Markers

 
18th Indiana Battery Marker image, Touch for more information
By Tom Gillard, November 6, 2009
18th Indiana Battery Marker
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — 18th Indiana Battery
Hoover's Gap, TN. June 24, 1863. The 18th Indiana Battery, commanded by Capt. Eli Lilly, dislodged one Confederate artillery piece and forced the Confederate batteries to change position. The battery, along with Wilder's Brigade, did considerable . . . — Map (db m81374) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — 20th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry
. . . — Map (db m30694) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — 2E 40 — Beech Grove Engagement
On June 24, 1863, Union forces under Rosecrans overpowered Confederate defenders on Hoover's Gap, commanded by Stewart, Bate, and Bushrod Johnson. This was the beginning of Bragg's withdrawal to Chattanooga. Unknown soldiers who fell in the battle . . . — Map (db m26052) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — Confederate Cemetery
Originally the site of a pioneer cemetery, many early residents are buried here. In 1866, returned Confederate soldiers, under the leadership of Maj. William Hume and David Lawrence, collected and reinterred here the bodies of soldiers who fell at . . . — Map (db m24162) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — 2E 6 — Fort Nash
Near here, on Garrison Fork, this fort was established, about 1793, for the protection of settlers and travelers to and from the southwest. Until its abandonment, about 1804, it was an important stopping place and administrative center. — Map (db m26050) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — General A. P. Stewart's DivisionMonument at Beech Grove, Tennessee
(Front):General A.P. Stewart Stewart's Division 2nd Army Corps (Hardee) Army of Tennessee CSA Dedicated 24th Day of April 2010 By Benjamin F. Cheatham Camp 72 Sons of Confederate Veterans Manchester, Tennessee (Reverse):Battle of . . . — Map (db m30698) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — General Forrest's Farewell Order MemorialUnknown Confederate Soldiers Memorial
Forrest's Farewell Order to his Cavalry Corps ExtractGainesville, Ala., May 9, 1865 Civil war, such as you have passed through, naturally engenders feelings of animosity, hatred, and revenge. It is our duty to divest ourselves of all such feelings, . . . — Map (db m30715) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — 2E 41 — Henry Watterson
Born in Washington, Feb. 16, 1840, where his father, Harvey Magee Watterson, was in Congress, he spent most of his boyhood in a house 100 ft. W. Subsequently Confederate soldier, journalist and political leader, he founded the Louisville . . . — Map (db m81375) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — Pledge to the South
The South is a land that has known sorrows; it is a land that has broken the ashen crust and moistened it with tears; a land scarred and riven by the plowshare of war and billowed with the graves of her dead; but a land of legend, a land of song, a . . . — Map (db m24167) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — Corporal Brian James Schoff
Nov. 27, 1983 to Jan. 28, 2006 2nd Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment 101st Airborne Division "Operation Iraqi Freedom" "Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you: Jesus Christ and the American Soldier. One died for your . . . — Map (db m83224) WM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — 2E 45 — Experiment in Armor
Hereabouts, on June 20, 1941, Maj. Gen. George S. Patton, Jr., personally led his 2nd Armored Division across several fords of Duck River, quickly surrounding and defeating his maneuver opponents in the Manchester vicinity, thus proving that modern . . . — Map (db m24968) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — 2E 47 — General Henry H. "Hap" Arnold
General "Hap" Arnold, WW II Commander of the Army Air Forces, is commemorated by the Air Force research and development installation bearing his name. In 1944, he directed long range planning for air research and development to maintain this . . . — Map (db m25920) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — Granny Hickerson Cemetery
This cemetery was established in the early 1800's, by the burial on this spot of David Hickerson and his wife Nancy Hickerson. It has been known throughout the years as the Granny Hickerson Cemetery, though members of other families are also known . . . — Map (db m69657) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — 2E 5 — Old Stone Fort
About 1/2 mi. S.W. are remains of stone fortification and moat of ancient and unknown origin. One theory is that it was built by a party of 12th Century Welch voyagers who entered the country via the Gulf of Mexico. Near here also was the capital of . . . — Map (db m24967) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — 2E 46 — Pioneer Armored Maneuvers
Maneuvering in this vicinity, June, 1941, the 2nd Armored Division, USA, commanded by Maj. Gen. George Smith Patton, Jr., gave the first demonstration in America of the mobility and decisive power of armor in large-scale combat operations. Maneuver . . . — Map (db m24969) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — The Civilian Conservation Corps
The Civilian Conservation Corps was launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt April 5, 1933 as a lifeline for undernourished sons of the Great Depression. Each company consisted of about 200 men who were housed in Tennessee barracks under the . . . — Map (db m81376) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — Tullahoma CampaignJune 24-July 4, 1863 — Anatomy of a Campaign
In late June of 1863, Union Major General William S. Rosecrans launched a massive offensive from his base in Murfreesboro in an attempt to drive Confederate General Braxton Bragg’s 43,000-man Army of Tennessee from its entrenchments at . . . — Map (db m75354) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — Tullahoma CampaignJune 24-July 4, 1862 — The Confederate War Industry
When Manchester was founded in the late 18th century, local lore has it that the town, named for Manchester, England, was destined to become an American version of this powerful industrial city. The Duck River falls, it was noted, would provide an . . . — Map (db m75355) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 12 — Army of Tennessee
Withdrawing to this area after the Battle of Murfreesboro, Gen. Braxton Bragg established his command post near here. Other units went into defensive winter quarters at Bell Buckle, Shelbyville & Wartrace. Here they remained until late June, 1863, . . . — Map (db m81378) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 72 — Baillet Sisters
Jane (Jennie) Baillet 1834 - 1918 Emma Adell Baillet 1838 - 1926 Affa Ann Baillet 1850 - 1934 This house was the home of Jane, Emma, and Affa Baillet whose family purchased the property . . . — Map (db m81379) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 34 — Camp Forrest
Originally established in 1926 for training the Tennessee National Guard, this became a Federal training area, Jan. 10, 1941. It was named for Lt. Gen. N.B. Forrest, CSA. Units training here included the 8th, 33rd, 79th & 80th Inf. Divs., 17th . . . — Map (db m24446) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Camp Forrest Monument
Camp Peay 1926 - 1940 Camp Forrest 1940-1946 Arnold Center 1949 Tullahoma, Tenn A tribute to the men and women who trained and worked at Camp Forrest and contributed significantly to victory in World War II. — Map (db m24430) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2 E 19 — Coffee County / Franklin County
Coffee County Established 1836; named in honor of Major General John Coffee Soldier, surveyor and close friend of Andrew Jackson. Tennessee troops under his command took a decisive part in the New Orleans Campaign, December 23, 1814 to . . . — Map (db m81380) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 44 — Confederate Cemetery
1 mile SW are buried 407 unknown Confederates. Many of these died in one of the hospitals established here when Tullahoma was headquarters for the Army of Tennessee during the first six months of 1863, following the Battle of Murfreesboro and . . . — Map (db m24296) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Confederate Memorial
On this ground are buried 407 unknown Confederates. Many of these died in one of the hospitals established here when Tullahoma was headquarter for the Army of Tennessee during the first six months of 1863. Following the Battle of Murfreesboro and . . . — Map (db m75311) HM WM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Fortress TullahomaStrategic Rail Center — Tullahoma Campaign
(preface) After the Battle of Stones River ended on January 2, 1863, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans occupied Murfreesboro. Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg withdrew south to the Highland Rim to protect the rail junction at Tullahoma, Bragg’s . . . — Map (db m81382) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 11 — Isham G. Harris
Born near here, 1818. Was the only governor of Confederate State of Tennessee. In Congress 1849-51; elected governor, 1857-59-61. When U.S. forces captured Nashville, joined staff of Army of Tennessee for remainder of War. Fled to Mexico, 1865; . . . — Map (db m61914) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 56 — James W. Starnes
South of here, at Bobo's Crossroads, Col. Starnes, 4th Tennessee Cavalry, CSA, then commanding Forrest's Old Brigade, was killed in a skirmish while his brigade was screening the withdrawal of the Army of Tennessee from Tullahoma to the Chattanooga . . . — Map (db m24188) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Maplewood Confederate CemeteryHallowed Ground
Tullahoma was the headquarters and logistics center of the Confederate Army of Tennessee for the first six months of 1863 after the Battle of Murfreesboro. At least three hospitals here treated soldiers wounded during Gen. Braxton Bragg’s 1862 and . . . — Map (db m75310) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Rangers2nd Ranger Bn         5th Ranger Bn
On January 8, 1943 2nd Army commenced an intensive training course to train Rangers at Camp Forrest. Tennessee. The 2nd Ranger Battalion was formed on April 1, 1943 by Lt. Col. W. C. Saffrans. Later these Rangers were trained and led by Major J. . . . — Map (db m24433) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — The Red Caboose
The car displayed here is a side bay window model caboose built in 1964 by the Louisville & Nashville Railroad at the company’s South Louisville yards. The exterior is restored to the original L & N red. The purpose of a caboose was to provide . . . — Map (db m75318) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Tullahoma CampaignJune 24-July 4, 1863 — From Contraband to United States Colored Troops
No sooner did the North begin its invasion than slaves fled to Union lines seeking freedom. This presented problems for military commanders and President Lincoln. The political aims of the war did not initially include emancipation. Before Lincoln’s . . . — Map (db m75324) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Tullahoma CampaignJune 24-July 4, 1863 — Anatomy of a Campaign
In late June of 1863, Union Major General William S. Rosecrans launched a massive offensive from his base in Murfreesboro in an attempt to drive Confederate General Braxton Bragg’s 43,000-man Army of Tennessee from its entrenchments at . . . — Map (db m75325) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Tullahoma CampaignJune 24-July 4, 1863 — Race to Tullahoma
When the Union Army of the Cumberland captured Manchester on June 27th, Braxton Bragg’s Confederate forces retreated here to Tullahoma - a supply base and Army of Tennessee headquarters since January, 1863. Tullahoma, however, was tactically a . . . — Map (db m81383) HM

34 markers matched your search criteria.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.