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Crawford County Pennsylvania Historical Markers

 
Alliance College Marker image, Touch for more information
By Mike Wintermantel, April 13, 2014
Alliance College Marker
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Cambridge Springs — Alliance College1912-1987
Founded in 1912 by the Polish National Alliance and dedicated by U.S. President William Howard Taft, Alliance College was one of the nation's first nationality colleges. Its mission was to provide educational opportunities for everyone, but . . . — Map (db m72989) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Cambridge Springs — Cambridge Springs
Between 1884 and 1915, this was a major health resort, founded upon the various mineral springs here. Dr. John H. Gray, who had discovered spring water on his farm, began prescribing and marketing it in 1884. By the early 1900s, some forty inns and . . . — Map (db m41025) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Conneaut Lake — Blue StreakAce Roller Coaster Landmark
Ace Roller Coaster Landmark American Coaster Enthusiasts (ACE) recognizes Conneaut Lake Park's Blue Streak as an ACE Roller Coaster Landmark, a designation reserved for rides of historical significance. Constructed as part of a major . . . — Map (db m107699) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Conneaut Lake — Conneaut Reservoir
Raised some 10 feet by a 23-mile "feeder" from Meadville, this lake was the vital source of water for the highest part of the canal, 4 miles west. Lake water and traffic flowed north to Erie, south to the Ohio River. — Map (db m74625) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Conneaut Lake — Erie Extension Canal
Remains of the canal bed may be seen beside the railroad, below the bridge. Less than 2 miles away, this Shenango Line, from New Castle, united with the Conneaut Line, from Erie. The entire canal was in use 1844-1871. — Map (db m39918) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Conneaut Lake — Geology
Conneaut Lake is a kettle lake formed by the receding glacier during the last Ice Age, about 12,000 years ago. As the glacier melted, a large block of ice partially embedded in accumulated sediment formed the depression, which became the lake. . . . — Map (db m74623) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Conneaut Lake — The Ice Industry and the Ice Houses
Just east of Ice House Park stood two large wooden structures to store ice harvested from the lake during the winter. Inclined wooden ramps led from the frozen lake to storage within the buildings whose walls were 12 inches thick and filled with . . . — Map (db m74616) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Conneaut Lake — The Railroads
Railroad service came to Evansburg, (Conneaut Lake), in 1859 with the establishment of a station south of town at Stoney Point, a stop on the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad. Passengers and freight were transferred to horse buggies and wagons . . . — Map (db m74622) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Conneaut Lake — This Carousel
Welcome children of all ages. This Carousel has been making memories at Conneaut Lake Park - formerly Exposition Park - since approximately 1914. Assembled by T.M. Harton of Pittsburgh, who also owned and operated carousels at West View and . . . — Map (db m107703) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Conneaut Lake — This Tablet
[two tablets, identical heading] This tablet is dedicated to the citizens of this community who gave full measure of devotion to their country that civilization might endure. — Map (db m107713) WM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Conneaut Lake — To the Memory of the Brave
Dedicated Sept., 10, 1866. to the memory of the brave of Evansburgh & Sadsbury who fell for their country during the War of the Great Rebellion. Killed in Battle I. Graff, Apr. 6, 1865, ae. 34 yrs.; G.W.Boutell; May 5, 1864, ae. 22 yrs.; . . . — Map (db m107722) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Conneautville — Erie Extension Canal
Part of the old channel lies near the highway. The Conneaut Line, from Erie to near Conneaut Lake, was begun by the State, 1838, and completed by the Erie Canal Company, 1843-44. Canal in use until 1871. — Map (db m60439) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Conneautville — Oil-Producing Salt Well
Drilled here in 1815 by Samuel Magaw and William Clark to reach brine, a frontier source of salt. When it was deepened by Daniel Shryock to 300 feet in 1819, oil was struck. Because of this unwanted byproduct, the well and salt works here were . . . — Map (db m60441) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Hartstown — Erie Extension Canal
Cut off from the rest of Pymatuning Swamp by a 3-mile bank, this became the 600-acre "Pymatuning Reservoir" of the canal, which lay at its western edge. Begun by the State, 1838; finished by the Erie Canal Company, 1843-44. — Map (db m60437) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Allegheny College
Oldest college in continuous existence under the same name west of the Allegheny Mountains. Founded 1815. Chartered 1817. The college's first president, Timothy Alden, was architect of Bentley Hall, which became the center of administration. — Map (db m41020) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Baldwin House
Two blocks from here is the home built 1841 by Justice Henry Baldwin. Appointed to United States Supreme Court in 1830. As a member of Congress in 1816 to 1822, he was an early protective tariff advocate. — Map (db m41021) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Birthplace of the Direct Primary
Here in Crawford County on Sept. 9, 1842, direct primary elections were born when county Democrats used this system to nominate candidates for the legislature and county offices. Republicans here began voting by this method in 1860. This "Crawford . . . — Map (db m41024) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Bishop James M. Thoburn
Methodist missionary to India, south Asia, and the Philippines, 1859 to 1908. Upon retirement he lived in Meadville until his death in 1922. He is buried in Greendale Cemetery. — Map (db m55074) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Chamber of Commerce
Founded in 1807 as the Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Manufacture and the Useful Arts, the nation's third oldest Chamber of Commerce met here in the old log courthouse, led by Crawford Messenger editor Thomas Atkinson and Holland Land . . . — Map (db m60448) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Crawford County
Formed March 12, 1800 from Allegheny County. Meadville, in 1788, was the first permanent settlement in northwest Pennsylvania. In 1842 the nation's first direct primary was held here. Cradle of the oil and zipper industries. Named for Colonel . . . — Map (db m41026) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Desegregation of Pennsylvania Schools
An event here in September 1880 led to the end of segregation by race in the state's public schools. At the South Ward schools, Elias Allen tried unsuccessfully to enroll his two children. He appealed to the Crawford County Court of Common Pleas, . . . — Map (db m41027) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — First Christian Church
Reflecting the diversity of early religious life, the first church here was the Central or Second Presbyterian acquired in 1904 by the Christian Church. In 1963 a new sanctuary was built on North Main Extension and the Landmark brick Church razed. — Map (db m55072) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — French Creek
The Riviere aux Boeufs of the French, renamed by George Washington in 1753. It had an important part in the French and Indian War and the settlement of northwestern Pennsylvania. — Map (db m60445) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — French Creek Feeder
The canal visible beyond the field was built 1827-1834. Repaired in 1841, it carried water from French Creek to Conneaut Lake, reservoir for the Erie Extension canal, which operated between Erie and New Castle , 1844-71. — Map (db m55065) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — French Creek Feeder
The canal bed beside the road is part of a channel constructed 1827-1834 to take water from Meadville to Conneaut Lake for the Erie Extension Canal. Two miles below here the Feeder crossed the creek by aqueduct. — Map (db m60444) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Hillcrest
Developed by Meaville Housing Corporation in 1936, it was the first project of its kind to be guaranteed by the FHA. Ninety seven industries, business concerns and individuals subscribed to the initial stock offering and the mortgage was . . . — Map (db m83698) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Historic District
Meadville's Downtown National Register District extends North from Clinton Court to North Street and West from Chancery Lane to Mulberry Street. It includes the institutional, commercial, industrial and residential hub of David Mead's original 1788 . . . — Map (db m55068) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Library Hall
Built as a production facility for the Meadville Woolen Company, this building later served as market & meeting hall. From 1879 to 1925 it was the home of the Meadville Library, Art, and Historical Association then was converted to commercial use. — Map (db m55071) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Meadville
Founded in 1788 by David Mead and other settlers from the Wyoming region. In 1800 made county seat. First direct primary in United States held here in 1842. Making of hookless fasteners was pioneered here. — Map (db m41028) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Meadville Market House
Built in 1870, enlarged in 1916, rescued in 1970 by a community drive, the Meadville Market House is the oldest continuous use market structure in Pennsylvania. Here, in the ancient tradition, farmers and local craftsmen still present their goods . . . — Map (db m85233) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Meadville Woolen Mills
In 1810, on hand looms and spinning wheels, Meadville produced 16,818 yards of woolen material. By 1870 a steam-powered mill, built here where Mill Run and the Feeder Canal joined briefly, made fine woolens from the fleece of county sheep for . . . — Map (db m85237) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Raymond Philip Shafer(1917-2006)
Pennsylvania State Senator, 1959-63, Lieutenant Governor, 1963-67, and Governor, 1967-71. The 1874 state charter was substantially reformed at a constitutional convention during his term. He promoted improvements in welfare, transportation, . . . — Map (db m41029) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Richard Henderson
Born a slave in Maryland in 1801, he escaped as a boy and about 1824 came to Meadville. A barber, he was long active in the Underground Railroad. His Arch Street house, since torn down, is estimated to have harbored some 500 runaway slaves prior to . . . — Map (db m41030) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Roddy Law Office
Canadian born Thomas Roddy was admitted to the Crawford County Bar in 1870. He served on City Council, library boards and Market House oversight committee. In 1881 he won Elias Allen's suit which desegregated Pennsylvania schools-all despite being . . . — Map (db m55069) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — The Kepler Hotel
The landmark Kepler Hotel, built in 1890, enlarged in 1923, served the community for 60 years. The Kepler family had operated hotels since 1812 at Woodcock, Venango, & Titusville before coming to Market Square in 1875. Revitalized 2003 by Meadville . . . — Map (db m85235) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — The Spirella Company
On this site were located the offices of the Spirella Company which produced made-to-measure corsets. The company provided jobs for 25 percent of Meadville's residents after the 1904 invention of a flexible steel stay by MM Beeman. Employee benefits . . . — Map (db m55067) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Meadville — Unitarian Church
A fine example of Greek Revival architecture. It was erected in 1835-36 at a cost of $3500, mostly given by Shippen and Huidekoper families. Planned by the builder of Fort Sumter, General George W. Cullum. — Map (db m41031) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), New Richmond — John Brown Tannery
John Brown of Ossawatomie and Harper's Ferry worked here as a tanner, 1825-35. The nearby house was then his home. His first wife and son are buried near. — Map (db m50447) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), New Richmond — John Brown's Tannery
On the side road, a short distance south, are the remains of the tannery and home built by the noted abolitionist of Harper's Ferry fame. Here, he lived and worked from 1825 to 1835, employing as many as 15 men in producing leather. — Map (db m50446) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Saegertown — McGill House
Built in 1802 by Patrick McGill, this log house one of the oldest surviving homes in the French Creek Valley. McGill was a farmer, organized the first school, and served in the War of 1812. Saegertown was originally known as McGill's Settlement. — Map (db m60447) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Saegertown — Rural Electrification
Here on August 5, 1936, the State's first rural electric pole was placed by the Northwestern Rural Electric Cooperative Association. Incorporated on April 30, 1936, this was Pennsylvania's first such cooperative. By 1941, thirteen more had been . . . — Map (db m60446) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Brown Street Bridge
Brown Street Bridge ♦ A Steel and Wrought Iron Baltimore Through Truss Design, 175-foot span locally known as the Brown Street Bridge, was constructed on this site crossing Oil Creek between 1898-1899. Prior to replacement in 1991 . . . — Map (db m107775) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Byron D Benson(1832-1888)
A founder and first president of Tidewater Pipe Co., est. 1878. He transformed the shipment of oil with a larger 6-inch pipe that covered greater distances than ever before. This pipeline was first to carry Pa. crude directly to coastal refineries. . . . — Map (db m64972) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Early Refinery
The first refinery in the Oil Creek Region for crude petroleum was built nearby in 1860. The first run of oil was made in 1861. Oil was first refined at Pittsburgh, about 1854, by Samuel Kier. — Map (db m64971) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Edwin L. Drake
The man who sank the first oil well is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, and is commemorated by Niehaus's bronze figure of "The Driller." Drake Well is now a State park, a mile and a half south of Titusville. — Map (db m50476) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Ida M. Tarbell
Noted oil historian, biographer of Lincoln, journalist, lived in this house about six years. She was graduated from the Titusville High School in 1875. — Map (db m50497) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — John A. Mather
Photographer of oil industry from 1860, lived in this house. His thousands of views form an extraordinary record of an industry that began here. Born, Bury, England, in 1829; died Titusville, 1915. — Map (db m50498) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — John William Heisman(1869-1936)
Renowned college football coach and name-sake for the sport’s highest amateur honor, the Heisman Memorial Trophy. His innovations included legalizing the forward pass, the center snap, the scoreboard, and game quarters. Heisman promoted player . . . — Map (db m50493) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Oil Creek
Along this stream the first white explorers found Indians skimming surface oil. From 1859 to 1865, the center of oil production and its refining was along the banks of Oil Creek. — Map (db m50494) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Roberts Torpedo
First successful device for increasing the flow of oil by setting off an explosion deep in a well. It was publicly demonstrated in 1865. The nitroglycerin was made .4 mile south of here, along Hammond Run. — Map (db m50495) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — St. Titus Church
Many Roman Catholics came into the area during the oil boom which began in 1859. The Reverend Father DeLarouque, who had been presiding over mass in a cooper shop, decided a church was needed. Ground was broken on this property in 1862 and the . . . — Map (db m107779) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Titusville Iron Company, 1860
The first machine shop and foundry built to serve the oil industry was located "a year and a mile from Drake Well." In 1889, new owners organized it as the Titusville Iron Company, Limited, under executive officers John Fertig and James Curtis . . . — Map (db m107782) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Titusville Oil Exchange
The industry's first permanent oil exchange was organized in 1871 by producers, refiners, dealers, brokers. Starting in the American Hotel on this spot, it moved to other sites; returned here in a new three-story brick building, 1881. Dissolved . . . — Map (db m50496) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Titusville Trust Company, 1919
"There are few bank buildings in America which equal this in permanence and quality of construction..." remarked architect Arthur Zimm. The Titusville Herald reported that "...few were prepared for the beauties revealed when its doors were . . . — Map (db m79974) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Titusvillia Drakei Caster
In ancient seabottom rocks exposed in this stream, the Holotype Specimen of a rare fossil sponge was found by Paleontologist Kenneth E. Caster. In 1939 in recognition of the support which brought the sciences of geology and paleontology to such . . . — Map (db m64970) HM
Pennsylvania (Crawford County), Titusville — Western NY and PA Railway Freight Station, 1892
In 1860, Thomas Struthers and his partners formed the Oil Creek Railroad to haul freight, coal, and oil between Corry and Petroleum Centre. The original station was destroyed in Titusville's great flood and fire of 1892, but rebuilt later that year. . . . — Map (db m107785) HM

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