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Harrison County West Virginia Historical Markers

 
Benedum Civic Center Marker image, Touch for more information
By Forest McDermott, October 30, 2018
Benedum Civic Center Marker
West Virginia (Harrison County), Bridgeport — Benedum Civic Center
Enlarged replica on site of original Michael L. Benedum family home, Benedum, born here 16 July 1869, died 30 July 1959. Known as the “Great Wildcatter” for success in oil exploration, he became as well known for philanthropy. Benedum . . . — Map (db m125816) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Bridgeport — BridgeportA Target of the Raid — Jones-Imboden Raid
(Preface): On April 20, 1863, Confederate Gens. William E. “Grumble” Jones and John D. Imboden began a raid from Virginia through present-day West Virginia against the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Taking separate routes, . . . — Map (db m58719) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Bridgeport — Combat Wounded
Combat Wounded Dear friend, beware as you stand by As you are now, so once was I As I am now, so you will be, So get prepared to follow me. “To follow you I am not content Until I know which way you went." We are such things . . . — Map (db m108674) WM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Bridgeport — John Powers' Fort
On Simpson Creek is the site of fort built by John Powers, 1771. Nearby is grave of Col. Benjamin Wilson, soldier and settler. Here lived Joseph Johnson, only Virginia governor from west of Alleghenies; first elected by popular vote. — Map (db m4545) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Bridgeport — Simpson Creek Covered Bridge
A. S. Hugill built 75' long by 14' wide multiple king-post truss bridge in 1881 for $1483 on land of John Lowe. Survived great flood of 1888 but was washed away from original site 1/2 miles upstream in 1899. — Map (db m8541) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — "Stonewall" Jackson
Birthplace of General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson. After a brilliant Mexican War record, he joined the Confederacy in 1861, earned his nickname and advancement in rank in first Battle of Bull Run, and was killed at Chancellorsville. — Map (db m73406) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — Clarksburg
(side 1) Established 1785. Named for Gen. George Rogers Clark. John Simpson camped here in 1764. Early permanent settlements were made by the Davissons, Cottrills, Sotha Hickman, Nicholas Carpenter, and others. (side 2) . . . — Map (db m73413) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — Clarksburg DefensesProtecting the Town and Railroad — Jones-Imboden Raid
On April 20, 1863, Confederate Gens. William E. “Grumble” Jones and John D. Imboden began a raid from Virginia through present-day West Virginia against the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Taking separate routes, they later reported . . . — Map (db m58717) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — Combat Wounded
Dear friend, beware as you stand by. As you are now, so once was I. As I am now, so you will be. So get prepared to follow me. “To follow you I am not content. Until I know which way you went.”

We are such things as dreams are made . . . — Map (db m104605) WM

West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — Northwest AcademySoldiers' Home
From 1861 through 1865, Clarksburg was temporary home to hundreds of Union soldiers. Although many tents and huts were erected to quarter he men, soldiers occupied every public building at one time or another. You are facing the site of one such . . . — Map (db m58718) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — Stonewall Jackson BirthplaceOrgins of a Confederate Hero
The house in which Thomas J. Jackson was born on January 21, 1824, stood across the street and halfway down the block to your right. (marked with a bronze plaque). His father struggled to make ends meet and poverty marred Jackson’s childhood. Both . . . — Map (db m58703) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — The Immigrants
"...So build your community that quickened conscience, larger vision, deeper devotion and equality of rights for all will resolve itself into an enthusiastic zeal for personal service in the community. All who give service are torch bearers." . . . — Map (db m73414) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson Monument
"Look at Jackson there -- Standing like a stone wall" Brig. Gen. Bee, at the First Battle of Manassas Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson, Lt. General, C.S.A. Born in Clarksburg, January 21, 1824. Died May 10, 1863, from wounds . . . — Map (db m73407) HM WM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson Birthplace
On this site stood the birthplace of Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson Lieutenant General C.S.A. Born January 21, 1824-Died May 10, 1863 — Map (db m73403) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — Towers School
Built in 1894 and named in honor of Reverend George Towers, graduate of Oxford, England who was a teacher at Randolph Academy. The Academy, authorized by the Virginia Assembly in 1787, stood just to the east and was the principal regional school . . . — Map (db m73405) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — U.S.S. West Virginia Bow Flag Staff
Placed in memory of those who gave their lives and in honor of all who served on this great battleship, sunk Dec. 7, 1941. — Map (db m73412) WM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Clarksburg — Union Meetings"We intend… to… remain in the Union"
Harrison County was among the first jurisdictions in western Virginia to support the Union. A pro-Union meeting was called for November 24, 1860, at the Clarksburg Courthouse, just after Abraham Lincoln had been elected president and many Southern . . . — Map (db m73418) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Lost Creek — B & O Depot
Built 1892, following the completion of railroad in 1887. Lost Creek grew to become largest shipping point for cattle in West Virginia in 1915 and on entire B & O system, east of Mississippi in 1923. — Map (db m35331) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Shinnston — Big Elm
Site of “Big Elm,” tree awarded “largest of its kind in US” in 1876. Measured over 30 feet in circumference at its base. The tree began dying by 1905, with the cause attributed to disease, the building of a streetcar line, . . . — Map (db m125818) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Shinnston — Granville Davison Hall
Born in 1837, Hall worked at the Wheeling Intelligencer during the Civil War. His reporting during the creation of WV served as the basis for his publication, The Rending of Virginia. Hall also recorded the proceedings of the . . . — Map (db m125819) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Shinnston — Levi Shinn House
Built, 1778, by Levi Shinn who came from New Jersey, 1773, and claimed tomahawk rights. Returned with family and brothers, Clement and Jonathan and settled. Sold part of land to Jonathan whose son, Levi, deeded it for site of Shinnston. — Map (db m125817) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Shinnston — Shinnston Tornado
At 8:30 p.m. on June 23, 1944, a large tornado struck this area without warning because weather news was banned during WWII. The violent tornado lifted the West Fork River from its bed and left path of destruction up to 1,000' wide. Storm claimed . . . — Map (db m125820) HM
West Virginia (Harrison County), Spelter — Spelter Community / Spelter Zinc Plant
Spelter Community Company town built for immigrant, primarily Spanish, zinc plant workers, 1910-11: housed 1,500 residents in 175 homes, renting for $11 per month by 1915. First known as Ziesing, for a company official; named Spelter for post . . . — Map (db m125821) HM

23 markers matched your search criteria.
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