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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Hickman County Kentucky Historical Markers

 
Markers and Memorial at the Courthouse image, Touch for more information
By Craig Swain
Markers and Memorial at the Courthouse
Kentucky (Hickman County), Clinton — 1497 — Clinton Seminary
First high school in Ky. west of Tenn. River established at Clinton, 1846. Frame structure erected; burned 1854. In 1850, Clinton Female Seminary was incorporated. Organized as Clinton Academy as charter made no mention of only women students. . . . — Map (db m36982) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Clinton — 895 — County Named, 1821
For Capt. Paschal Hickman who was massacred by Indians after River Raisin battle, Jan., 1813, one of nine Ky. officers killed in that action for whom counties named. Resided Franklin County, extensive landowner. Originally, Hickman comprised the . . . — Map (db m36945) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Clinton — 1400 — Guerrilla Raids on Clinton
Federal troops garrisoned in area between 1862 and 1865 were often harassed by enemy guerrillas. March 10, 1864, Clinton was first raided by about forty who took supplies and horses that had been purchased for Union army. On July 10, 1864, . . . — Map (db m51844) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Clinton — Hickman County Veterans Memorial
In honor and memory of the veterans of Hickman County who served their country faithfully and proudly — Map (db m36983) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — 528 — "Gibraltar of the West"
Troops under Gen. Leonidas Polk fortified strategic line of bluffs here Sept. 3, 1861 marking CSA's first move in Ky. To prevent passage of Union gunboats, a huge chain was stretched across the Mississippi River. After Union success in Tenn., CSA . . . — Map (db m37098) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — A River View of History
The Mississippi River looms large in our history. Early on, it marked the nation's westernmost boundary. As the country expanded, the river became the eastern border of the western frontier. "The Mighty Mississippi" linked far-flung places in . . . — Map (db m37123) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — African Americans at Columbus during the Civil War
Confederate General Leonidus Polk occupied the site of Columbus and began erecting extensive fortifications in September of 1861. In addition to the soldiers under his command, more than 13,000 at one point, over 10,000 African American slaves were . . . — Map (db m37287) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — Anchor and Chain
"The rebels have a chain across the river about one mile above Columbus. It is sustained by flats, at intervals, chain passing through steeples placed about the water's edge, the chain passing under the boats." - Report from Union spy to . . . — Map (db m37297) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — 1398 — Columbus
First entire town in Kentucky to be moved from one site to another. In 1927, after the most severe flood in its history, Columbus was moved from the banks of the river to this bluff, 200 feet above, by the American Red Cross at a cost of $100,000. . . . — Map (db m18466) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — Columbus - A Town Transformed
The view from these 180-foot bluffs has changed significantly in the last several centuries. The Mississippi River has shifted course. Portions of the bluff has crumbled into the river. The bustling town of Columbus, which once lay just beneath . . . — Map (db m37124) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — Confederate Trenches
The main objective of the Confederate Army in fortifying Columbus was to block Union movements on the Mississippi River. In so doing they also had to protect their position from inland attack. The trenches through which this trail leads are part of . . . — Map (db m37317) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — Earthquakes Along the Mississippi
Why are there quakes along the Mississippi River? Geologists have many theories but do not know why quakes occur around New Madrid, Missouri. They do agree that the geology of the Mississippi valley is unique because of Reelfoot rift and the . . . — Map (db m37170) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — Fourth United States Colored Heavy Artillery
The Fourth United States Colored Heavy Artillery was initially organized as the Second Tennessee Heavy Artillery, African Descent and also briefly known as the Third Mississippi. Despite its initial designation as a Tennessee unit and second . . . — Map (db m37295) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — In Search Of ....
Apparently, after Cannon # 209 was lost, no effort was made to immediately recover the cannon. World War II created severe shortages of manpower, equipment, and money. Several searches after the war were unsuccessful. In 1984, a local historian and . . . — Map (db m37316) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — 60 — Iron Banks
So named by early French explorers. Columbus was proposed as the nation's capitol after the War of 1812. The area was fortified by the Confederate army during the War Between the States. — Map (db m18465) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — Polk's Firepower
This Model 1829 Cannon # 209 was affectionately called a "32-pounder". This simply means it shot a 32-pound, round iron shot. Most of the large cannons used at Forts DeRussy, Henry, Donelson, Pillow, and Island #10 were this size. Cast in 1839 at . . . — Map (db m37300) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — The Battle at Belmont, Missouri7 November 1861
Read Me First The following maps and text illustrate the battle at Belmont, Missouri. The battle is broken into sections that explain the components of the overall battle. To understand the progression of the battle, match the number above each . . . — Map (db m37089) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — The History of Columbus, Kentucky
Settlement and Early Growth The French explorers Marquette and Joliet first explored the area around Columbus in 1673. The French gave Columbus the name "Iron Banks," believing the color of the banks indicated the presence of iron. In 1783, the . . . — Map (db m37014) HM
Kentucky (Hickman County), Columbus — The Mississippi River in the Civil War
The Mississippi River in the Civil War "Whatever nation gets control of the Ohio, Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, will control the continent." Union General William Tecumseh Sherman, 1861 The goal of both the Northern (Federal or Union) . . . — Map (db m37355) HM

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