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Jefferson County Texas Historical Markers

 
Beaumont Marker image, Touch for more information
By Brian Anderson, June 10, 2018
Beaumont Marker
Texas (Jefferson County), Beaumont — 10493 — Beaumont
County seat of Jefferson County. Settled in 1825 as Tevis Bluff; incorporated as Beaumont Dec. 16, 1838. Early trading post, riverboat port, lumber, rice and ranching center. Near site of Spindletop gusher, where oil became an industry, ushering in . . . — Map (db m118626) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Beaumont — 10527 — French Trading Post
Built 1845 by John J. French (1799-1889), merchant and tanner who came from Connecticut and New York to Texas in 1830s. Served as home and store, with tannery nearby. Early settlers came to “French Town” to trade tallow, hides, corn, and . . . — Map (db m60304) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Beaumont — 10544 — Henry Millard
A native of Saratoga County, New York, Henry Millard moved to Missouri with his family while still a child. As a young man he moved to Natchez, Mississippi, where in 1826 he married Mary Warren Beaumont. While living in Natchez they became the . . . — Map (db m118627) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Beaumont — 10536 — Jefferson County Courthouse
The first county building constructed at this site was a jailhouse completed in 1838, two years after the organization of Jefferson County. Located on land acquired from Nancy Tevis, a pioneer settler of the area, it also housed county offices and . . . — Map (db m118625) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Beaumont — 10537 — Jefferson Theatre
Built in 1927 by the Jefferson Amusement Company, this theatre quickly became a landmark in downtown Beaumont. Emile Weil, Inc., a New Orleans architectural firm, designed the structure. The interior is a showcase of fine materials and . . . — Map (db m76253) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Beaumont — 10554 — Port of Beaumont
The city of Beaumont, 41 miles inland from the Gulf of Mexico, was served from its founding in 1837 by schooners and sternwheelers navigating the Neches River. The three-foot depth of Sabine Lake between the river's mouth and the Gulf limited . . . — Map (db m118629) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Beaumont — 10576 — Texas' First Rice Mill
Beaumont Rice Mill, founded 1892 by J. E. Broussard, was developed after first commercial planting of rice in Texas in 1863. Earlier crops, due to dependence on rain, were dubbed “providence rice.” Broussard, pioneer grower and . . . — Map (db m76242) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Beaumont — 10540 — The Lucas Gusher
Discovery well of the Spindletop Oil Field and the first important well on the Gulf Coast. It blew in on Jan. 10, 1901, flowing 100,000 barrels of oil a day from a depth of 1020 feet. The oil production which resulted made Beaumont a city and the . . . — Map (db m64411) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Beaumont — 10578 — Tyrrell Public Library
Built in 1903 as the First Baptist Church, this limestone structure replaced a red brick church on the same site. Architect of the Romanesque Revival style edifice was A. N. Dawson and contractor was G. D. Patterson. In 1923, when the Baptist . . . — Map (db m118628) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Port Arthur — 10548 — Early Oil Tanker Service
Part of the huge transportation complex that moves petroleum to world markets. Traffic in oil tankers and barges in Texas mushroomed two months after the state's first oil gusher, "Spindletop," roared in. On March 11, 1901, the first boat to . . . — Map (db m118630) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Port Arthur — 12562 — The Port Arthur Refinery
The eruption of the Lucas Gusher at the Spindletop oil field in January 1901 established Texas as a major oil source and signaled the beginning of a significant economic boom to the state. The new town of Port Arthur benefited tremendously from its . . . — Map (db m118631) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 12425 — 1886 Hurricane at Sabine Pass
In October 1886, Sabine Pass was the second largest town in Jefferson County, boasting a new rail line and an optimistic outlook on continued growth as a major coastal port. On the afternoon of October 12, just two months after a hurricane had . . . — Map (db m118670) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 13645 — Beach Road
The Beach Road is the coastal section of the Texas Highway 87 system. Stretching along the Gulf of Mexico from Sabine Pass through Chambers County to Port Bolivar in Galveston County, it follows a historic route that proved vital to the early . . . — Map (db m118676) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 13429 — Capture of the USS Morning Light and USS Velocity
After Texas seceded from the Union at the onset of the Civil War, the state's ports were included in a Union blockade of the South. The proximity of Sabine Pass to Galveston made it a strategic point for both the Union and Confederacy. In January . . . — Map (db m118789) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 10500 — City of Sabine and Sabine Pass
The first known settlers in this area were John McGaffey and Thomas Courts, who arrived in 1832. Sam Houston assisted Manuel de los Santos Coy in acquiring a land grant here in 1833. Two years later Houston and two partners purchased Coy's property . . . — Map (db m118671) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 15458 — Commodore Leon Smith
Maine native Leonidas Smith (b. 1829) became a sailor as a youth and, by age 21 commanded the U.S. Mail Packet Pacific along the west coast. At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, he was sailing out of Galveston, Texas. He served as . . . — Map (db m118780) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — Dick Dowling
Commemorating the feat of Dick Dowling and his forty two Irish patriots Sabine Pass, Texas. 1861 C.S.A. 1865 "September the 8th 1863, an army of fifteen thousand Federals attacked the small fort at the Pass; the brave little garrison . . . — Map (db m118815) HM WM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 10558 — Federal Fatalities at the Battle of Sabine Pass
The Civil War battle at Sabine Pass on September 8, 1863 was a victory for Lieutenant Richard W. Dowling and his troops, which numbered fewer than 50. Dowling and his Davis Guards kept Union gunboats from advancing up the pass. The U.S.S. . . . — Map (db m118791) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 10526 — Fort Manhassett(7.5 Miles West)
To protect Texas against Federal invasion during the Civil War, Confederate General John B. Magruder ordered the construction of a fort on September 4, 1863, four days before the famous Confederate victory won by Dick Dowling and his small company . . . — Map (db m118775) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 17600 — Fort Sabine
During the Civil War, the Sabine Pass Channel was a strategic gateway to the interior of eastern Texas and western Louisiana, control of which was vital. Fearing a possible Union invasion, the citizens of Sabine City (later Sabine Pass) formed a . . . — Map (db m118674) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 10509 — Richard Dowling
Center Front Panel In memory of Lt. Richard W. Dowling and his men. Texas remembers the faithfulness and valor of her sons and commends their heroic example to future generations. The Men Who Fought with Lt. Dowling Were: Left Front Panel . . . — Map (db m118792) HM WM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — Sabine Bank Lighthouse
This lantern and watchroom once made up the top 20 feet of the Sabine Bank lighthouse, which originally towered 72 feet above the water in the Gulf of Mexico. The lighthouse was fabricated in Detroit, Michigan and shipped to Sabine by railway in . . . — Map (db m118814) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 10525 — Site of Fort Griffin(1863-1865)
Renowned for brilliant Civil War victory, Sept. 8, 1863. Confederates in this fort repulsed a fleet seeking to land thousands of Federal soldiers. Lt. Richard W. Dowling (1838-1867), in civilian life a Houston businessman, commanded fort during . . . — Map (db m118779) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 10567 — Spaight's 11th Battalion
Commanded by Col. Ashley W. Spaight, the 11th Battalion of Texas Volunteers, Confederate States Army, was nicknamed the "Swamp Angels." Tracing its origins to the "Sabine Pass Guards" militia formed in 1861, the battalion served during the Civil War . . . — Map (db m118675) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 10568 — Spanish-American War Fortifications(Approximately 3 miles south)
As tension mounted between the United States and Spain during the late 1890s, U. S. Representative Samuel Bronson Cooper of Texas recommended the War Department begin plans for the defense of the strategic Sabine Pass area. The Army Corps of . . . — Map (db m118776) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — Union Casualties at the Battle of Sabine Pass
Union Casualties at the Battle of Sabine Pass September 8, 1863 USS Clifton Killed United States Navy Exec. Officer Robert Rhodes Michael Driscoll, Landsman 75th Regt. New York Volunteers Pvt. Henry Raymond, Co. A . . . — Map (db m118812) HM WM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 10559 — United States Forces at the Battle of Sabine Pass
Federal forces in the Civil War failed in most of their early efforts to capture Texas. In the fall of 1863, after taking New Orleans and Vicksburg, their leaders attacked Western Louisiana in a renewed effort. They wished to divert valuable stocks . . . — Map (db m118790) HM
Texas (Jefferson County), Sabine Pass — 13116 — World War II Coastal Defenses at Sabine Pass
The natural coastal cut of Sabine Pass has long been an important military strategic point, as evidenced by the battle that took place here during the Civil War. It was no less significant in World War II, when it became one of the primary points of . . . — Map (db m118778) HM

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