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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Johnson City Tennessee Historical Markers

 
Wide view of the Carter County / Washington County Marker image, Touch for more information
By Paul Crumlish, July 17, 2011
Wide view of the Carter County / Washington County Marker
Tennessee (Carter County), Johnson City — 1A 31 — Carter County / Washington County
[Front]
Established 1796 named in honor of Landon Carter Treasurer of Washington and Hamilton Districts. Speaker of the first State of Franklin Senate, later its Secretary of State, also Lieutenant Colonel of the Washington . . . — Map (db m45948) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Johnson City — 1A 17 — Dungan’s Mill
6.5 miles northwest, at the mouth of Brush Creek, is a mill built by Jeremiah Dungan in 1779, and continuously operated since then. East of it was a stone fort erected by pioneers of the Watauga Settlement.
Dungan and other pioneers are buried . . . — Map (db m45997) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union troops. This . . . — Map (db m126463) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — Andre Michaux1746-1803
(Side one) From 1785 to 1796, French botanist Andre Michaux, the foremost European botanist of his day, traveled throughout eastern North America. On assignment from the French monarchy, Michaux studied and collected North American plants, . . . — Map (db m69628) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 56 — Boone's Creek Church
About 1 1/2 miles southwest, this Christian church was organized 1825 by Rev. Jas. Miler. Here, Aug. 17, 1829, was held the first recorded conference of Christian churches in East Tennessee. Other elders present were Jeriel Dodge, Robt. . . . — Map (db m22860) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 89 — Brush Creek Campground
On September 2, 1811, James Nelson deeded to trustees William Nelson, William Duzan, James King, Jacob Hoss and John R. Boring, 4 acres and 8 poles to be used by the Methodist Episcopal Church for a house of worship. For many years a campground for . . . — Map (db m47230) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 120 — Colored Christian Church and Colored School1889
This 1889 structure, originally "the Colored Christian Church," now West Main Street Christian Church, was also Johnson City's second school building (1889-1891) for "Colored" children. It is the oldest church building and school building still . . . — Map (db m22866) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 27 — Daniel Boone
0.2 miles along this road is the waterfall under which Boone hid himself from raiding Indians; the falls were then about 4 feet high. 1.1 mile along the road, a marker indicates the site of the beech tree where "D. Boon Cilled a bar in . . . — Map (db m83060) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 134 — East Tennessee & Western North Carolina Depot
Constructed in 1891 as a union depot for the East Tennessee & Western North Carolina Railroad (nicknamed “Tweetsie”) and the East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia Railroad, the building served as a passenger railway terminal until 1940. . . . — Map (db m47301) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A-28 — Fiddlin’ Charlie Bowman1889-1962
Charlie Bowman, Hall of Fame fiddler, vaudeville performer, and writer of Nine Pound Hammer and East Tennessee Blues, toured with the Hill Billies and other music groups, once performing for President Calvin Coolidge. Two daughters, . . . — Map (db m45590) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 50 — First Court of Washington County
On Feb. 23, 1778, 0.6 mile NE at the house of Col. Charles Robertson, Trustee, on the “east (Catbird) branch of Sinking Creek” was held the First Court of the newly formed County of Washington, North Carolina, with John Carter, Chairman; . . . — Map (db m83061) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 22 — History on Knob Creek
About 0.3 miles east stood Twin Falls Grist Mill, belonging to Peter Range, an early immigrant from New Jersey. He bought this land in 1804-08 and built the 2-story & basement stone house, standing today. His limestone marker reads, “P. Range, . . . — Map (db m47462) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 26 — Jesse Duncan
Two and one quarter miles east, on a ridge north of the road, is the grave of this pioneer, who was killed and scalped by Indians in 1765. He was the first white man known to have been slain in this area. A monument marks this site. — Map (db m22858) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 93 — Johnson CityIncorporated - December 1, 1869
The town was formerly known as Green Meadows, Blue Plum, Johnson's Depot, Haynesville, then Johnson City. It is situated on land grants of 1782 to Robert and Joseph Young and in 1792 to Joseph Tipton. The town charter was repealed in 1879, but . . . — Map (db m22868) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — Landon Carter HaynesConfederate Senator
This was the home of Landon Carter Haynes, a distinguished lawyer and politician who ran unsuccessfully for the U.S. House of Representatives before the onset of the Civil War. Haynes was born in Carter County on December 2, 1816. He attended nearby . . . — Map (db m69684) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 110 — Langston High School1893-1965
This building housed Johnson City’s first African-American public high school. Named for U.S. Congressman John Mercer Langston, an educator, lawyer, and the first African-American elected to public office in the United States (Ohio, 1856). Langston . . . — Map (db m83062) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — Mountain Home National Cemetery
National Home The ninth of eleven branches of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (NHDVS), the Mountain Branch was authorized in 1901. The first resident arrived in 1903, a year before the home officially opened. Civil War . . . — Map (db m127200) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1 A 135 — National Soldiers’ Home
Approved by an Act of Congress on Jan. 28, 1901, the Mountain Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers was created through the work of Tennessee Congressman Walter P. Brownlow (1851–1910). Known locally as Mountain Home, the . . . — Map (db m2711) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 60 — Robins’ Roost
William T. Graham built this house in 1890. Robert Love Taylor bought it in 1892 and named it. He went from here to his third term as Governor. His brother, Alfred Alexander Taylor, bought it in 1900, living here until 1903. The latter was Governor . . . — Map (db m47412) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 88 — Samuel Cole WilliamsJanuary 15, 1864 - December 14, 1947
Front Culminating his career as an attorney, teacher, codifier of law, and justice of the State Supreme Court, Judge Samuel Cole Williams -- the Dean of Tennessee Historians -- provided in the 1940's the leadership and inspiration for . . . — Map (db m83063) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 58 — Science HillMale & Female Institute
Tipton Jobe, on Feb. 14, 1867, gave land on this hill above Nobb Spring where members of Science Hill Literary Society then built the first brick building in the area to house this school. It was dedicated Oct.27, 1867. The dedicatory sermon was by . . . — Map (db m22905) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 86 — State Flag
In 1905 the Legislature adopted as the state flag one which was designed by Colonel Le Roy Reeves, a native and resident of Johnson City. The three stars represent the three grand divisions of Tennessee. The flag was first raised by Company F of the . . . — Map (db m47234) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — Tennessee Early History Monument
(Side one) Colonial Period The first men of the English speaking race to tread the soil of Tennessee, James Needham and Gabriel Arthur, passed this site in June, 1673. They followed a great buffalo trail. Crossing the Alleghenies . . . — Map (db m83134) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 111 — Tipton-Haynes Historic Site
Site of the home occupied by John Tipton, a Revolutionary War officer, legislator, and opponent of the State of Franklin. A skirmish between supporters and opponents of Franklin was fought here February 27-29, 1788. The house was later owned by John . . . — Map (db m83135) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 5 — William Bean's Cabin
About 1½ miles to the east on a knoll beside Boone’s Creek, a monument marks the spot near where William Bean, first permanent white settler in Tennessee, built his cabin in 1769. The site was previously used by Daniel Boone as a hunting camp. . . . — Map (db m22862) HM
Tennessee (Washington County), Johnson City — 1A 75 — William Nelson Home
1 mi. N. was the home of William Nelson. A native of Virginia, he was one of the earliest settlers in this region and served in the Revolutionary War. Francis Asbury, early Methodist bishop, held annual conferences here in 1793, 1796, and 1797. . . . — Map (db m22864) HM

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