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Knox County Tennessee Historical Markers

 
Concord, Tennessee image, Touch for more information
By Tom Bosse, December 26, 2016
Concord, Tennessee
Tennessee (Knox County), Concord — The Old Cumberland Presbyterian Meeting House
The first Cumberland Presbyterian Congregation in East Tennessee was organized c. 1822 and given the name Concord. The church building, often referred to as the "Old Meeting House", was located 2 miles SE of the present town of Concord just off . . . — Map (db m102446) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Corryton — 1E 41 — Nicholas Gibbs
Born in Germany in 1733, he served in the French and Indian War, later in the Revolution. He took up a homestead of 450 acres here in 1792 and built the log cabin which stands about 1/2 mile east. A member of Knox County's first court, he died in . . . — Map (db m33074) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Corryton — 1E 107 — Nicholas Gibbs Homestead
Nicholas Gibbs, a prominent Knox County Pioneer homesteaded 450 acres here in 1792 and built this hewed log house approximately one year later. It remained in the Gibbs family until 1971. The Nicholas Gibbs Historical Society purchased the house in . . . — Map (db m32945) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Corryton — 1E 35 — Sawyer's Fort
On this site, about 1785, Col. John Sawyer, a soldier of the Revolution, built a homestead and fort for protection against Indians. Emory Road, which ran Southwest to the Clinch River in 1788, passed through here. — Map (db m82198) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Admiral David Glasgow Farragut — History of the Farragut Area
David Glasgow Farragut was born on July 5, 1801, to Jorge and Elizabeth Farragut at Lowe's Ferry on the Tennessee River, less than five miles from present day Farragut, Tenn. He lived in this area until 1807 when the family moved to New Orleans. In . . . — Map (db m100870) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Admiral David Glasgow Farragut Monument
Admiral David Glasgow Farragut Birthplace - Campbell Station in Knox County, Tennessee * James Glasgow Farragut was born on 5 July 1801 in a log cabin at Stony Point just four miles southeast of the location referred to in 1801 as . . . — Map (db m69466) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Admiral Farragut's Birthplace — Hero of Mobile Bay
In front of you, on the promontory just across the cove, is where David Glasgow Farragut was born on July 5, 1801. Farragut's father, George Farragut, came to the American colonies in 1776 from Spain as a merchant sea captain. During the . . . — Map (db m101431) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — 1E8 — Archibald Roane
A short distance north lived Archibald Roane, Continental soldier, frontier judge and the second governor of Tennessee. He is buried in Pleasant Forest Cemetery, one~half mile south. Many other pioneer settlers are also buried there. — Map (db m28572) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — 1E 73 — Battle of Campbell's Station
The Federal Gen. Ambrose Burnside, pursued by Gen. James Longstreet from Lenoir's Station via Concord, eluded an attempt by Gen. Lafayette McLaws, C.S.A., coming from Loudon via the Hotchkiss Valley and Kingston Roads, to head him off at the . . . — Map (db m28514) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Battle of Campbell's Station — "Form on me."
(preface) On November 4, 1863, to divert Federal forces from Chattanooga, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet led two reinforced divisions from the city to attack Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside’s garrison in Knoxville. Burnside confronted . . . — Map (db m69456) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Birthplace of Admiral Farragut
Birthplace of Admiral Farragut Born July 5th 1801 Erected by Bonny Kate Chapter D. A. R. Knoxville Dedicated by Admiral Dewey May 15th 1900 — Map (db m32218) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — 1E7 — Campbell Station
This house marks the site of the station established in 1787 by Col. David Campbell as a frontier fort for protection against Indian attacks. On the main highway to the west it was an important trading post and stopping place for travelers and stock . . . — Map (db m28773) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — 1E 97 — David Glasgow Farragut — 1801-1870
A native of Stony Point (Low's Ferry) David Farragut moved to New Orleans at the age of three. At the age of ten, he began a career with the U.S. Navy; ca. 1827, pioneered a school for seamen; 1841, improved hoisting machinery for ammunition; . . . — Map (db m28513) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Farragut Schools: Early Years
In 1902, eight men from the community met to consider the question of establishing a high school in the 10th district of Knox County. Mr. C.H. Stoltzfus, a farmer in the community, was elected president of this group. Mass meetings for all members . . . — Map (db m100881) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Farragut Schools: Recent Years
Named for Admiral David Glasgow Farragut who was born in this area, Farragut High School began in 1904 as a six-room frame academic building on 12 acres of land at the junction of Concord Road and Kingston Pike. In addition to practical agriculture, . . . — Map (db m101749) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — 1E 37 — Loveville
Robertus Love, a companion of Gen. James White, who founded Knoxville, established the village in this area in 1797 where he had built a fulling mill in 1792. Several of early buildings still exist a short distance from the highway. The . . . — Map (db m31984) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Medal of Honor 17th Michigan Volunteer Regiment — Turkey Creek & Campbell Station November 16, 1863 — 9th Corps - First Division - Third Brigade Captain Frederick Swift • Sgt. Joseph Brandle
On November 16, 1863, the 17th Michigan was assigned as part of the Rear Guard along with the 2nd Michigan, 20th Michigan and the 100th Pennsylvania to protect the rest of Burnside's Army which were now in retreat into the defenses of Knoxville. . . . — Map (db m101830) HM WM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Memorial for Cofounders of Campbell Station
Colonel David Campbell Born 1753 - 1832 * David Campbell donated the land for Pleasant Forest Cemetery. David Campbell and Archibald McCaleb settled Campbell Station on March 7, 1787. By 1798 a small church and school was erected on the . . . — Map (db m102448) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Native American Settlement
Initial permanent habitation in the area we now call Farragut began approximately 3,000 years ago when the Woodland Indians moved in the area on a permanent basis and became east Tennessee's first farmers.

The Woodland tribe was replaced . . . — Map (db m100831) HM

Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Pleasant Forest Church & Cemetery
David Campbell, who owned much of the land in the fertile region called Grassy Valley, donated a portion of it for the purpose of erecting a "Meeting House", as churches were then called. A school building at the location was about one and one . . . — Map (db m100834) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — The Battle of Campbell Station — History of the Farragut Area
On Nov. 4, 1863, Lt. Gen. James Longstreet — with two divisions, about 5,000 cavalry and approximately 12,000 troops — was detached from the Confederate Army of Tennessee near Chattanooga to attack Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside's Union . . . — Map (db m100879) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — The Campbell Station Inn
History tells us that as early as 1785, the State of Franklin (today Tennessee) entered into an agreement, known as the Dumplin Creek Treaty, with the Cherokees. This treaty opened the land along the French Broad and Holston rivers to a rush of . . . — Map (db m107928) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — The Historic Village of Concord — The Establishment of the Railroad and Marble Industry
The need for improved methods of importing supplies and exporting local products had for some time been recognized by farmers and merchants of East Tennessee who, of necessity, relied on horse drawn freight wagons or rafts and barges. In 1852, the . . . — Map (db m100872) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — The Historic Village of Concord — The Depression and TVA
By 1887, Concord was the second largest community in Knox County, second to Knoxville. The Village of Concord was a regional transportation center. Tennessee marble, crushed limestone, lime, logs and farm produce were gathered at its public dock. . . . — Map (db m101433) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — The U.S. Veterans Memorial
"To those who fought for it, life has a special meaning that the protected will never know...". Written on a C-Ration box Khe Sahn RNV 1967 or 68 Unknown U S Warrior Author.

The American Veterans of Foreign Wars - AMVETS - erect this monument . . . — Map (db m101831) HM

Tennessee (Knox County), Farragut — Town of Farragut & Farragut Folklife Museum
In May 1979, a group of citizens began meeting to discuss the possibility of incorporation. They felt incorporation was necessary in order to control zoning, land use, signage issues and Farragut's own destiny. A small steering committee, named the . . . — Map (db m101750) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Fountain City — 1E 24 — Fort Adair
Established in 1788, this fort was used as a depot of supplies for the Cumberland Guard, the militia organization which supplied armed protection for parties of emigrants to the Cumberland Settlements, later the town of Nashborough, now . . . — Map (db m95270) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Fountain City — Site of Fort Adair
. . . — Map (db m32531) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Fountain City, Knoxville — 1E 112 — Fountain City United Methodist Church — Fountain Head Campground
Fountain City United Methodist Church Founded in 1825In 1824, E.F. Sevier, grandson of Gov. John Sevier, came to this area as a Methodist circuit rider. By 1825, a plot of ground was secured and Fountain Head became a "preaching place." A log . . . — Map (db m32350) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union troops. . . . — Map (db m100523) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 131 — Airplane Filling Station
In 1931 to tap the market newly created by the evolution of transportation and mobility of Americans, brothers Henry and Elmer Nickle of Powell, Tennessee, opened a gasoline filling station in the unusual shape of an airplane. The airplane is one of . . . — Map (db m123112) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Andrew Johnson Office Plaza
Site of original Andrew Johnson Hotel constructed in 1927 Restoration by Aetna Casualty & Surety Company 1985. This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Dept. of Interior — Map (db m4110) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 9 — Archie Campbell / Chet Atkins — Cradle of Country Music Tour
Archie Campbell Archie Campbell, a beloved comedian in the country music family, launched his career as an announcer for WNOX in 1937. After a brief stint on Chattanooga radio and service in World War II, Campbell returned to Knoxville and . . . — Map (db m118603) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Back Door to Knoxville
Fort Dickerson came under attack only once during the Civil War. in a prelude to the 1863 Siege of Knoxville, Federal and Confederate cavalry fought for possession of these heights. Its lofty presence, however, served as a deterrent until the end of . . . — Map (db m4316) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 32 — Ball Camp
About 3 miles NW, on Plumb Creek, Nicholas Ball, trapper and Long Hunter, established a camp which was used by westbound emigrants. Several years after founding this camp he was killed by Indians near Wells Station, Dec 23 1793. — Map (db m32615) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Bleak House — Confederate Memorial Hall
Bleak House, the home of Robert Houston Armstrong and Louisa Franklin Armstrong, is an Italianate-style mansion completed in 1858. During the Siege and Battle of Knoxville, November 17–December 4, 1863, the house was Confederate Gen. James . . . — Map (db m69488) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 43 — Blount Mansion
Built in 1792, this was one of the first frame houses west of the Alleghenies. It served as both the residence of William Blount, Governor of the Territory South of the River Ohio, and as capitol of that territory, now the State of Tennessee. Born . . . — Map (db m82200) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 126 — Byington
Born circa 1862 in McMinn County, Tennessee, Moses Brownlow Byington Sr., moved to the Beaver Ridge community circa 1883. He was instrumental in establishing the town of Byington and two major landmarks: the Byington L & N Railroad Station around . . . — Map (db m114040) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 31 — Cavett's Station
About 1/2 mile north was this early fortified settlement. Here on Sept 25, 1793, Alexander Cavett and 12 other settlers were massacred by a Cherokee war party under Doublehead, one of the more savage chiefs of the tribe. — Map (db m32688) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Chisholm Tavern
. . . — Map (db m4108) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Chisolm's Tavern — c 1790s
Chisholm's Tavern was the name of a tavern (more defined as an Inn) in the 1790s located near the site of the Dwight Kessel Garage. The tavern was established by John Chisholm, an early settler important to the development of Knoxville. Chisholm was . . . — Map (db m118582) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 88 — Civil War Hospital
This building was used as a hospital for Confederate forces from their occupation of Knoxville until September, 1863; thereafter similarly by the Federals. It was formerly the main building for the Tennessee School for the Deaf, which was located on . . . — Map (db m107949) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Civil War Knoxville
What Brought the Armies of the Blue and the Gray to Knoxville? Knoxville was a pro-Confederate town of some 3700 persons when Tennessee seceded from the Union in June of 1861. It was the commercial and light manufacturing center of East . . . — Map (db m82201) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Commemorating the Treaty of Holston
Signed by Gov. Wm. Blount and forty one Cherokee Chiefs and Warriors. On the site of the home of Gov. Blount, corner of Hill Ave. and State Street, Knoxville Tenn. July 2, 1791 — Map (db m81209) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 86 — Confederate Cemetery
During the Confederate War, 1861-1865, more than 1600 Confederate soldiers and about 50 Federal prisoners were buried here. About 20 Confederate veterans have been buried here since the war. The tall monument was erected in 1892 by the Ladies' . . . — Map (db m84327) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 67 — Death of Gen. William P. Sanders
Brig. Gen. William P. Sanders, using dismounted cavalry to hold off the Confederate advance from the west, was fatally wounded on this ridge, Nov. 18, 1863, dying the next day. — Map (db m76541) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Death of General William P. Sanders — November 19, 1863
U.S. General William P. Sanders died in the bridal suite of this building which was the Lamar House hotel at the time of the Civil War. On the previous afternoon Sanders was mortally wounded as his cavalry fought on Kingston Road, delaying the . . . — Map (db m118761) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 117 — Desegregation of the University of Tennessee
During a federal lawsuit in 1952, the University of Tennessee opened enrollment in the graduate and law programs of the institution to African Americans. Gene Mitchell Gray enrolled in graduate school, and Lincoln Blakeney enrolled in the College . . . — Map (db m118342) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 19 — Elvis Presley — Cradle of Country Music Tour
At a small store on Market Square, a Knoxville record merchant helped launch the most famous career in musical history. Sam Morrison of Bell Sales Company chose to promote Elvis Presley's That's All Right, Mama by playing it on loudspeakers to the . . . — Map (db m118602) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Fallen Military Heroes of Bearden High — A Tribute To Our Vietnam Dead
GM2 (Seal) Carter M. Dean • CPL. James D. Travis • LT Charles H. Pilkington • Sgt. George E. Clark, Jr. • LT Frederick M. Rader III • SP-4 George E. Clark, Jr. • SGT. William B. Bishop II • CWO2 Stephen M. Hiscock • 2ND LT William H. . . . — Map (db m101375) WM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Father Abram J. Ryan — (1838–1886)
Confederate chaplain, poet of the Confederacy, author of the requiem of the Lost Cause, “The Conquered Banner,” written at Knoxville soon after Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865, and pastor of the Immaculate . . . — Map (db m115499) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — First Baptist Church
First Baptist Church Built 1924 has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m3786) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 70 — Fort Byington
"The Hill," dear to University of Tennessee alumni, was protected by a battery of Federal cannon and a brigade of infantry during Longstreet's siege of Knoxville, in Nov., 1863. A line of entrenchments ran across the west and south slopes of the . . . — Map (db m101787) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Fort Dickerson — Civil War Earthen Fort
–1863– • One of sixteen Union Army earthen forts and battery positions protecting Knoxville, Nov. 1863–May 1865. • Named for Capt. Jonathan C. Dickerson, 112th Illinois Mounted Infantry who was killed near Cleveland, TN . . . — Map (db m4319) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E-79 — Fort Dickerson
This Federal work was a major factor in the defense of Knoxville against Lt. Gen. Longstreet's assault in November, 1863. The fort and neighboring hills were manned by the 2nd Brigade(Cameron), 3rd Div., XXIII Corps, which repulsed by fire Wheeler's . . . — Map (db m62514) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 82 — Fort Dickerson
Linking with other hills south of the river, this Union position was a major factor in the defense of Knoxville. Occupied on Nov. 1, 1863, by the 2nd Brig. (Col. Daniel Cameron), 3rd Div. XXIII corps, its gunfire broke up an attempt on Nov. 15-16 by . . . — Map (db m84480) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Fort Dickerson — Defending Knoxville
On November 4, 1863, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet led two reinforced divisions from Chattanooga to attack Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside's garrison at Knoxville. Burnside confronted Longstreet below Knoxville, then withdrew on November 12. . . . — Map (db m100512) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Fort Dickerson 1863–64
Fort Dickerson was one of the sixteen Federal forts and battery emplacements constructed around Knoxville during the Civil War. Temporary earthworks were thrown up here in November 1863. Designed by Capt. Orlando M. Poe, Chief Engineer of the Army . . . — Map (db m4315) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 69 — Fort Sanders
Fort Sanders, a bastioned earthwork on the ridge two blocks north of here, was the scene of Gen. James Longstreet's unsuccessful assault upon the Federal defenses of Knoxville at dawn, Nov. 29, 1863. — Map (db m69491) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Fort Sanders — Decisive Battle for Knoxville — Knoxville Campaign
(preface) On November 4, 1863, to divert Federal forces from Chattanooga, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet led two reinforced divisions from the city to attack Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside’s garrison in Knoxville. Burnside confronted . . . — Map (db m82209) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Fort Sanders U.D.C. Monument
To the memory of the Confederate soldiers Who fell in the assault on Fort Sanders November 29, 1863. Nor wreck, nor change, nor winter's blight Nor Time's remorseless doom Shall dim one ray of glory's light That gilds your glorious . . . — Map (db m76504) WM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 74 — Forts Dickerson and Stanley
Fort Dickerson to the west and Fort Stanley to the east were the center two of four fortified heights held by the Federals south of the river during the siege of Knoxville, Nov. 17-Dec. 4, 1863. Maj. Gen. Jos. Wheeler C.S.A., made a vain effort to . . . — Map (db m62515) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — From Scuffletown to Sunsphere
For six months in 1982, the world visited Knoxville's Second Creek valley. The World's Fair attracted more than 11 million visitors to the city. An amusement park was near the mouth of Second Creek and international pavilions filled 70 acres between . . . — Map (db m118571) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Gay Street — The Center of Celebrations — Betsey Beeler Creekmore
July 4, 1793, was a gala day in the tiny Territorial Capital. The Gazette ecstatically reported that, at 2 p.m., the newly arrived Federal troops paraded, and fired a cannon to salute; at 4 o'clock, all the citizens partook of an elegant . . . — Map (db m118451) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 111 — General Clifton Bledsoe Cates — 1893-1970 — United States Marine Corps
Side A Born in Cates Landing, Tennessee, on August 31, 1893, Clifton B. Cates attended school in Tiptonville and the Missouri Military Academy in Mexico, Missouri. While excelling in varsity football and baseball, he received his law degree . . . — Map (db m101786) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — In Grateful Memory to the Defenders of Cavett Blockhouse
Upon this spot stood the house of Alexander Cavett who was murdered together with two men and the Cavett family of twelve, September 25th, 1793, after heroic resistance against a combined Creek and Cherokee force numbering one thousand warriors, . . . — Map (db m109336) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 115 — James Park House
The Foundation for this house was laid by Governor John Sevier on a block bought from Knoxville founder James White in 1797. James Park, pioneer merchant and Knoxville's second mayor, completed the main house in 1812. His son, Dr. James Park . . . — Map (db m118398) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 101 — James Rufus Agee
Born in Knoxville November 27, 1909, Agee was well-known and respected in the fields of journalism, poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and film. He won a Pulitzer Prize posthumously in 1957 for A Death in the Family, a novel based on his youth in . . . — Map (db m101785) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — James White — Founder of Knoxville
Erected the city's first dwelling in this block in 1786. White's Fort was later constructed to surround the house. Knoxville was named for Henry Knox, Washington's Secretary of War, and was chosen by Governor William Blount as capital of the . . . — Map (db m82210) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E-80 — John Sevier Farmstead
Marble Springs was the farmstead of John Sevier. Tennessee’s first governor (1796–1801 and 1803–1809). While Sevier used the farm as a retreat where he entertained guests, it was originally a frontier station used by immigrants on the . . . — Map (db m62516) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Knox County World War II Memorial
In memory of those from Knox County who gave their lives in the Second World War — Map (db m101829) WM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 87 — Knoxville College
This liberal arts institution was opened in Knoxville by the United Presbyterian Church in 1875. It crowns the ridge from which the main batteries of Lt. James Longstreet's attacking force shelled the Federal Fort Sanders about 1800 yards to the . . . — Map (db m107952) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Knoxville National Cemetery
Civil War Knoxville In an 1861 referendum, 81 percent of East Tennessee voters rejected secession. Many in Knoxville, the region's largest city, supported the Union. During the Civil War, 30,000 East Tennesseans joined the U.S. Army. When . . . — Map (db m100498) WM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Knoxville: A Divided City — Simultaneous Union and Confederate Rallies
In April 1861, before Tennessee seceded, Knoxville was deeply divided. Excited residents gathered in the streets and held rallies to sway public opinion. These divisions were never more visible then than during simultaneous Union and Confederate . . . — Map (db m100524) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Knoxville's Market House
Knoxville's first Market House, opened on Main Avenue between Walnut and Market Streets in 1816, and the second and third on this square in 1854 and 1897, long served for the sale of farm products and as a colorful center of civic life. In 1863-64 . . . — Map (db m98566) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1 — Knoxville's Old Custom House / Fiddlin' Bob Taylor — Cradle of Country Music Tour
Knoxville's Old Custom House You are standing in front of Knoxville's first federal building, the Old Custom House (1874). The Custom House originally housed the federal court, excise offices, post office, and later, Tennessee Valley . . . — Map (db m118517) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Krutch Park — Charles E. Krutch — 1887-1981
Krutch Park is the legacy of Charles Krutch, the last survivor of an eccentric and talented family. When they first arrived in Knoxville in the 1850's the proud German clan spelled their name Krόtsch (the name is pronounced Krootch). Several of the . . . — Map (db m118446) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 118 — Land Grant University
In 1867, by resolution of the U.S. Congress, Tennessee became eligible to designate an institution to teach areas of learning related to agriculture and the mechanic arts and to receive the proceeds from the sale of federal land as prescribed by the . . . — Map (db m118354) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 66 — Longstreet's Headquarters
"Bleak House," the home of Robert Houston Armstrong, was used as the headquarters of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet and Major Gen. Lafayette McLaws, C.S.A., during the siege of Knoxville, November, 1863. — Map (db m69486) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Market House Bell
This bronze bell hung in the tower of City Hall, on the north end of Market Square, beginning in the 1880s. Rung by the police chief, the bell signaled civic emergencies such as major fires and riots, via a number-based code. An effective means of . . . — Map (db m98564) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 91 — Mecklenburg Place
On this site stood the home of Dr. James Gettys McGready Ramsey, physician, civic leader, statesman and author of the Annals of Tennessee, who lived here from 1872 until his death in 1884. It was named for Dr. Ramsey's first home, Mecklenburg, at . . . — Map (db m101751) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Neyland Stadium
Neyland Stadium, one of the largest stadiums in North America, is named for General Robert Neyland (1892-1962). This football coach who, in his 21 seasons at U.T., led the Vols through nine undefeated seasons and brought the Vols a National . . . — Map (db m118618) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 98 — Odd Fellows Cemetery
This Cemetery was established in 1880 by the Banner Lodge Chapter of the Odd Fellows Fraternal Order. This Cemetery was enlarged by the Daughters of Zion in 1881, the Good Samaritans in 1884, and the Silver Moon Chapter of the Odd Fellows in 1885. . . . — Map (db m84478) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 102 — Old Gray Cemetery
Old Gray Cemetery, incorporated in 1850, is the resting place of William G. Brownlow, Tennessee Governor and U.S. Senator, as well as two other U.S. Senators, eight U.S. Congressmen, 26 mayors of Knoxville, and numerous ambassadors, judges, editors, . . . — Map (db m69501) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Old Gray Cemetery — Silent Voices
Since the Civil War, the thirteen-acre Old Gray Cemetery has been the final resting place for Union and Confederate veterans. During the conflict, control of Knoxville shifted from Confederate to Union forces, so it is appropriate that both sides . . . — Map (db m82211) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 92 — Old Knox County Courthouse
The third courthouse of Knox County was across Main Ave. to the north from 1842-1886. There twelve Union raiders who were charged with train stealing in the 1862 Great Locomotive Chase in Georgia, were tried in 1863. One was convicted. The trial was . . . — Map (db m4106) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Patrick Sullivan's Saloon
Irish immigrant Patrick Sullivan (1841-1925), came to Knoxville with his family in the 1850s to work on the new railroad. Sullivan, a Union veteran, established his first bar near this spot soon after the Civil War, and built this larger, grander . . . — Map (db m118708) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Ramsey House Plantation
Site of birthplace of J.G.M. Ramsey, A.M.,M.D March 25, 1797 author of Annals of Tennessee — Map (db m4105) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 3 — Roy Acuff & Hank Williams — Andrew Johnson Hotel — Cradle of Country Music Tour
The Andrew Johnson Hotel's top floor was the original site for WNOX's live country music variety show The Midday Merry-Go-Round. An early star of the show was a little known fiddler named Roy Acuff. The rowdy fans and musicians who crowded the . . . — Map (db m118604) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 119 — St. Clair Cobb — 1895-1974
A World War I veteran born in Knox County, St. Clair Cobb founded the Knoxville Colored High School Band in 1923. He taught music at several elementary schools, Beardsley Junior High School, and Austin High School, which was previously located at . . . — Map (db m92854) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 17 — St. James Hotel — Cradle of Country Music Tour
The St. James Hotel located on Wall Avenue, off of Market Square, was the site of several significant recordings with the Brunswick-Balke-Collander Company in 1929 and 1930. The Tennessee Ramblers, a family band from nearby Clinton, Tennessee, . . . — Map (db m118514) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 23 — States' View
One mile south, Charles McClung erected his brick home about 1806. McClung laid out the city of Knoxville in 1791 on the site of White's Fort, was on the committee to draft Tennessee's first Constitution. and was a charter trustee of Blount . . . — Map (db m32689) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 28 — Staub's Theatre
Built on this spot by Peter Staub, native of Switzerland, and opened October 1, 1872. In excellence and popularity it rivaled theatres of New Orleans and Richmond. Adolph Ochs, later publisher of New York Times, was its first chief usher. — Map (db m118729) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 8 — Tennessee Ernie Ford — WROL Studios — Cradle of Country Music Tour
While hosting the WROL studios in the late 1940s and 1950s, this building served as the center of a new movement in country music - bluegrass. The legendary duo Flatt and Scruggs used WROL as their home base for radio performances and touring. The . . . — Map (db m118462) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — The 1863 Siege of Knoxville — Fortifications and Battle Sites
Introduction. After defeating the Union Army of the Cumberland in the bloody battle of Chickamauga (Sep 18-20, 1863) and besieging the Federal provisions in the city of Chattanooga, Confederate Army of Tennessee Commander Gen. Braxton Bragg . . . — Map (db m100827) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 68 — The Assault Upon Fort Sanders
Four brigades of infantry, Gen. James Longstreet's First Corps, emerging from the declivity to the north made a bayonet charge upon Federal Fort Sanders at this point, at dawn, Nov. 29, 1863. They were stopped with heavy casualties by a deep ditch . . . — Map (db m76502) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — The Baker-Peters-Rogers House
(side 1) The Baker-Peters-Rogers House is significant for its history and its architecture. The surroundings of the house have changed drastically since its construction c. 1840. The house was the center of an extensive farm in west Knox . . . — Map (db m94311) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 5 — The Everly Brothers — Cradle of Country Music Tour
In the 1950s, this building was home to the WROL-AM studios. The Everly Brothers performed here until they left the station in a dispute with Cas Walker, the station's famed promoter and show host. After leaving WROL, Phil and Don Everly were . . . — Map (db m118515) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 2 — The Knoxville Girl — The Louvin Brothers — Cradle of Country Music Tour
The Knoxville Girl and other adaptations of folk ballads were among the earliest popular recordings in country and bluegrass music. The Knoxville Girl was among the early national recording hits for WNOX radio stars, The Louvin Brothers. In . . . — Map (db m118770) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 11 — The Midday Merry-Go-Round — Cradle of Country Music Tour
The remains of this building mark the site that once served as WNOX's studio and "radiotorium" from the late 1930s until the 1950s. The Midday Merry-Go-Round, hosted by Lowell Blanchard, was broadcast six days a week at lunch time and was the most . . . — Map (db m118839) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — The Southern Railway Station
The Southern Railway Station at Knoxville Tennessee has been placed on the National Register of Historic Railroad Landmarks. 1903-2003 The two story buff brick station with its gables was designed by Frank P. Milburn and opened in 1903. An . . . — Map (db m69517) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 4 — The Tennessee Barn Dance — Cradle of Country Music Tour
Known for its beauty and acoustics, Staub's Opera House was operating under the name of the Lyric Theatre when it played host in the 1940s to WNOX's legendary live weekend show, The Tennessee Barn Dance, which featured such local performances as . . . — Map (db m118719) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — This street is dedicated to the memory of Sergeant Lillard Earl Ailor
. . . — Map (db m107946) WM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E-33 — Treaty of the Holston
250 yards east, near the mouth of First Creek, William Blount, Governor of the Territory South of the River Ohio, on July 2, 1791, signed a treaty with 48 chiefs of the Cherokee. It ceded a tract of land east of Clinch River extending approximately . . . — Map (db m62517) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — UT RecSports Complex
Although no permanent villages or campsites were located on this site prior to the arrival of settlers, this property was part of the tribal lands of the Cherokee Nation. In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, this property was used as pasture . . . — Map (db m109331) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — Vinnies Italian Restaurant
This Property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m69518) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — War Dog Memorial
This War Dog Memorial is an exact replica of the original erected in Guam in 1994, was donated by Dr. Maurice Acree as a tribute to the unique bond between dogs and humans. Dr. Acree became a major benefactor to the UT College of Veterinary Medicine . . . — Map (db m120514) WM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — War on the Home Front — Mabry-Hazen House and Bethel Cemetery — Knoxville Campaign
(preface) On November 4, 1863, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet led two reinforced divisions from Chattanooga to attack Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside’s garrison at Knoxville. Burnside confronted Longstreet below Knoxville, then withdrew . . . — Map (db m82212) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 85 — West Wing of Federal Lines
The west wing of Burnside's entrenchments in the Federal defense of Knoxville, Nov. 17 - Dec. 4, 1863 was anchored here on the river. His line ran northeast to the site of Melrose Hall, University of Tennessee, then north to Ft. Sanders (17th St. . . . — Map (db m101774) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 29 — White's Mill
A small tub-mill on First Creek, nearby, for grinding corn, was the first industrial establishment in this region. It was built by Gen. James White in 1786. For this reason the infant settlement was called "White's Mill" as often as "White's Fort." — Map (db m118663) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Knoxville — 1E 103 — William Francis Yardley
Born in Knox County in 1844, he taught school and began the study of law in the late 1860s. In 1873, he was the first African American in Knoxville to be admitted to the State Bar; he served as Justice of the Peace, Alderman, and Second Assistant . . . — Map (db m84330) HM
Tennessee (Knox County), Kodak — Steamboat Times on the French Broad
The Lucile Borden traveled the French Broad River under Captain James E. Newman at a time before other modes of transport had come to the area. In the late 1800s, roughly 50 country stores served the needs of residents along or near the French . . . — Map (db m110594) HM

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