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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Manassas Virginia Historical Markers

 
Close-up of Map on Marker image, Touch for more information
December 3, 2006
Close-up of Map on Marker
Virginia, Manassas — Battle of Bull Run BridgeLiberia — Second Manassas Campaign
In Aug. 1862, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee ordered Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson from the Rappahannock River to keep Gen. John Pope’s and Gen. George B. McClellan’s armies from uniting. Jackson marched on Aug. 25, and Lee followed . . . — Map (db m13286) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Burning of Manassas
Manassas Junction was twice destroyed by fire in the Civil War and badly damaged by fires in 1905 and 1911. The Confederates burned their base here in March 1862 to avoid seizure by the Federals and Stonewall Jackson destroyed the Federal base in . . . — Map (db m2456) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Clover Hill Farm
In 1770 Patrick Hamrick sold this land to Rutt Johnson who used the land for crops and fruit trees and later added livestock. This property became known as CLOVER HILL FARM prior to 1852. During the Civil War the Johnson family left the area. When . . . — Map (db m40212) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Confederate Cemetery
Dedicated by the Ladies Memorial Association of Manassas, on August 30, 1889, to the heroes of Virginia and her sister states, who yielded their lives on July 18 & 21, 1861 & August 28, 29 & 30, 1862, in defense of the Confederate cause. — Map (db m19815) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Defenses of Manassas
In this vicinity stood a number of small earthworks erected by the Confederates in the summer of 1861 to protect the railroad and their army’s base here. The Confederates evacuated Manassas in March, 1862, destroying what militarily useful material . . . — Map (db m2470) HM
Virginia, Manassas — CL-5 — Fifth Prince William County Courthouse
The city of Manassas originated in 1852 at the junction of the Manassas Gap and the Orange & Alexandria railroads. During the Civil War the junction’s strategic significance led to two important battles nearby. After the war, as the community grew, . . . — Map (db m778) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Harry J. Parrish
Harry J. Parrish—The Man. Harry Jacob Parrish was born February 22, 1922 and has made Manassas his lifelong home. He attended Prince William county schools, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Wofford college, and schools of the US Air Force. . . . — Map (db m702) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Katie Hooe House
This structure reputedly is the oldest dwelling in Manassas. Part of the building is of log and is supposed to have been built before the Civil War. Most of the original houses of the hamlet of Tudor Hall—subsequently Manassas, were in the . . . — Map (db m2415) HM
Virginia, Manassas — CL-4 — Manassas
According to tradition the name Manassas was derived either from an Indian source or from Manasseh, a Jewish innkeeper at Manassas Gap (35 miles west). The community originated in 1852 at the junction of the Manassas Gap and Orange & Alexandria . . . — Map (db m23697) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1825Liberia Plantation — Plantation & Civil War Headquarters
Built by the Weir family in 1825, this Federal-style home is one of the few pre-Civil War dwellings that remains in the area. Once a prosperous 2,000-acre plantation, Liberia had a general store, a post office, and a school, and boasted a successful . . . — Map (db m28309) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1850Katie Hooe House & Tudor Hall — A New Village
The Kate Hooe House at 8920 Quarry Road is the only known building in the historic district believed to date from the pre-Civil War period, when Manassas was a small village at the junction of two railroad lines. This wood frame house contains a . . . — Map (db m23798) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1862Civil War Railroad Turntable & Repair Shop — Railroad Central to War
In this vicinity stood the Civil War era Orange & Alexandria Railroad repair shops. Just east of Manassas City Hall stood the sidings and turntable of the railroad, used to reverse the direction of a train. When the Confederates evacuated the . . . — Map (db m23825) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1890 - 1900sRailroad Work's Homes Add Variety to City Architecture — A Prosperous Town
After the county seat moved to Manassas in 1892, and the Southern Railway continued to prosper, the area outside the core downtown and along the railroad track experienced a building boom. The new clapboard homes ranged in style from Italianate, . . . — Map (db m23797) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1892Annaburg Manor — Grand Summer Home
Prussian-born Robert Portner, Alexandria brewer and businessman, built Annaburg in 1892 as his show place summer home and escape from the city. It became the center of beauty and interest with 35 rooms, electricity, and reportedly, one of the first . . . — Map (db m28356) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1900A Flurry of Construction — Speiden Leaves Mark on Town
As Manassas grew and prospered in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the historic district filled with prominent homes, churches, and commercial buildings. The town had two banks and two newspapers. Telephone service began in 1895. Albert . . . — Map (db m23826) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1905 - The Great FireCourage & Determination Save Town
During the cold winter night of December 5, 1905, a smoldering fire began in Blossom's Alley across the tracks from the train depot. It soon raged through the young town of Manassas, destroying 35 homes, the post office, and business bordered by . . . — Map (db m23773) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1906Rebuilding Manassas — A Spirit of Optimism
When the Civil War ended, newcomers and residents rebuilt the burned and devastated landscape around this vital railroad junction. The resulting town of Manassas, incorporated in 1873, quickly became the transportation and commercial hub of Prince . . . — Map (db m23828) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas Presbyterian Church
Built in 1875, this building served the congregation for 100 years. Built of locally quarried red sandstone, the church had original Tiffany windows which were removed to the new church. The church was shown in My Son John, a movie partially . . . — Map (db m2471) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortA Civil War Redoubt — The Manassas Museum System
This 11-acre historic park, part of the Manassas Museum System, contains one of only two surviving Civil War fortifications in the City of Manassas. The earthwork was built by Confederate troops in the Spring of 1861 as part of the Manassas Junction . . . — Map (db m2366) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortThe People and the Land — The Manassas Museum System
American Indians lived on the land long before white settlers and slaves came to this area. Living in nomadic hunter-gatherer groups, people called the Dogues and the Mannahoacs roamed the Northern Virginia Piedmont region. Archaeological evidence . . . — Map (db m2386) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortUnearthing the Past — The Manassas Museum System
Archeology is the detective work of history. Evidence recovered from the soil often provides valuable clues for learning how people lived, worked, and died, especially when documentary sources are scarce. Excavations were conducted at the Hooe . . . — Map (db m2393) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortMonster Manassas - How Strong a Stronghold? — The Manassas Museum System
The Mayfield earthwork, known in military engineering terms as a redoubt, was a circle of raised earth some 200 feet in diameter. It may have included a retaining wall of timbers and brush, and planks to support artillery. While capable of . . . — Map (db m2396) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortFirepower — The Manassas Museum System
Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard, commander of the troops defending Manassas, had been one of the pre-war U.S. Army's outstanding artillerists. Fearing an imminent Union attack, he worked feverishly to obtain cannons for the fortifications and experienced . . . — Map (db m2405) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortQuaker Guns — The Manassas Museum System
Some of the Confederate cannons placed at Manassas and nearby Centreville were for show only. These non-functioning cannon were intended to deceive Union soldiers who might turn their telescopes on the earthworks: “This was nothing other . . . — Map (db m2408) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortFortifying the Junction — The Manassas Museum System
Following Virginia’s decision to secede from the Union in in April 1861, Southern troops began arriving here at the small village of Tudor Hall, which soon came to be known as Manassas Junction. This place, where the Orange & Alexandria and Manassas . . . — Map (db m41503) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortThe Changing Fortunes of War — The Manassas Museum System
After the First Battle of Manassas on June 21, 1861, Confederate forces continued to hold Manassas Junction until March 1862. They evacuated Manassas and moved south in order to counter Union Gen. George B. McClellan’s plans to attack Richmond. . . . — Map (db m41504) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortManning the Fort — The Manassas Museum System
The life of Civil War soldiers in camp was one of boredom, fear, mischief, disease and even death. Thousands of young men, many of whom had never before left their family farms or urban neighborhoods, were crowded into the makeshift camps. Disease . . . — Map (db m41505) HM
Virginia, Manassas — CL-6 — Old Bennett School
In 1908 the General Assembly authorized ten agricultural high schools, one in each congressional district. The first such school was built in Manassas in 1908-1909 and named for Dr. Maitland C. Bennett, who donated the land. During construction, . . . — Map (db m772) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Opera House
Built circa 1907. Served as the main community center for Manassas until the mid 1930s. It later was used by the Manassas Journal newspaper. — Map (db m2472) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Peace JubileeFriendship and Reconciliation
In July, 1911, an amazing event took place here at Manassas, Virginia. The Manassas National Jubilee of Peace brought together Union and Confederate veterans fifty years after the first major battle of the Civil War. For the first time, veterans of . . . — Map (db m2469) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Site of Manassas Junction
One mile west was the junction of the Orange and Alexandria and Manassas Gap Railroad lines. The point became known as Manassas Junction. During the Civil War both sides used the area as a supply base. The site of the first depot was probably about . . . — Map (db m700) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Steam Locomotive Tire Fire Alarm – 1909
One of the challenges for volunteer fire departments is how to alert their members to a fire. In July 1909, the Town of Manassas authorized Mr. J. I. Randall, the first town Fire Chief, to purchase three locomotive tires to be suspended in frames in . . . — Map (db m392) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Steam Locomotive Tire Fire Alarm – 1909
One of the challenges for volunteer fire departments is how to alert their members to a fire. In July 1909, the Town of Manassas authorized Mr. J. I. Randall, the first town Fire Chief, to purchase three locomotive tires to be suspended in frames in . . . — Map (db m2417) HM
Virginia, Manassas — The Manassas MuseumDefending the Junction — First and Second Manassas Campaigns
During the 1850s two railroad lines, the Orange & Alexandria and the Manassas Gap, intersected at a small Prince William County village that became known as Manassas Junction. In 1861 more than 20,000 Confederate troops from across the South . . . — Map (db m41506) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasPrelude to First Manassas
(Preface): During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military . . . — Map (db m2453) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasWorld’s First Military Railroad
(Preface): During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and Confederacy as a supply depot and for military . . . — Map (db m2459) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasWalking and Driving Tours
The Manassas Museum System invites you to take walking and driving tours of the city’s historic Civil War sites. This map shows the locations of the sites featured on both tours. Copies of the map may be obtained inside the museum to take with you. . . . — Map (db m2462) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas“On to Richmond!”
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2464) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasJackson’s Daring Raid
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2465) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasThe Curious Descend on Manassas for Curios
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2466) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas“The Sickness is Upon Us”
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2467) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasConfederates Withdraw to Richmond
During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2468) HM

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