Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Mason County West Virginia Historical Markers

 
Captain John Hereford side of Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, September 29, 2018
Captain John Hereford side of Marker
West Virginia (Mason County), Apple Grove — Mercer’s Bottom / Captain John Hereford
Mercer’s Bottom. This is part of the 16,000 acre tract surveyed by order of Washington for General Hugh Mercer. Nearby are the graves of Adjutant John Hereford and Ensign John Wilson. They were officers in the Revolutionary Army. Captain . . . — Map (db m125578) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Clifton — William H. Powell
Born 1825 in Wales, he emigrated to U.S. as a child and was working in iron industry when war erupted Commissioned captain of 2nd (West) Virginia Cavalry at Ironton, OH, and won Medal of Honor for actions at Sinking Creek Valley in . . . — Map (db m124893) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Gallipolis Ferry — May Moore Mound
This is one of the larger burial mounds in the State. It has never been properly excavated, but was probably built by the Adena people between 500 B.C. and A.D. 1. Several smaller mounds can also be seen in this area. — Map (db m125577) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Glenwood — Albert Gallatin JenkinsHome of a General
This was the childhood home of Albert Gallatin Jenkins. He was born in 1830 and was educated at Marshall Academy, Jefferson College, and Harvard Law School. Jenkins practiced law and served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1857-1861). When . . . — Map (db m73694) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Glenwood — Clover Archeological Site
Clover Archeological Site has been designated a National Historic Landmark. This site possesses national significance in commemorating the history of the United States of America. — Map (db m73695) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Glenwood — General Jenkins
“Greenbottom” (N.E.) was home of General Albert G. Jenkins, brilliant Confederate officer, mortally wounded at Cloyd's Mountain in 1864. On raid in Sept. 1862, Jenkins 8th Virginia Cavalry was first to carry Confederate flag into . . . — Map (db m73693) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Glenwood — Thomas Hannan
Born 1755, died 1835. Soldier in the Revolution and the first white settler in Cabell County. Blazed trace from Saint Albans to Chilicothe which bears his name. This was the first road that came into Cabell and Mason Counties. Hannan owned . . . — Map (db m125580) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Lakin — “Mark Twain” Family
Samuel and Pamela Clemens, grandparents of “Mark Twain,” settled here in 1803. Samuel was accidentally killed in 1805 at a “house-raising.” Their eldest son, John Marshall, the father of “Mark Twain,” lived . . . — Map (db m124904) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Mason — Virgil A. Lewis
Educator and historian born near West Columbia, July 6, 1848; died in Mason City, December 5, 1912; was buried in Point Pleasant. He founded the Southern Historical Magazine in 1892; was State Superintendent of Schools, 1893-97; . . . — Map (db m124886) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Pliny — General McCausland
Home of General John McCausland, 1836–1927, one of the last officers of the general staff of the Confederate Army. He served in Pennsylvania, the Virginias, and Maryland. He led Lomax’s cavalry against Sheridan in Valley Campaign. — Map (db m92555) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — “Border Grays”
Organized at Barboursville Sept. 18, 1862, with Captain William Gunn as commander. Served with the Guyandotte Battalion until Jan. 1863, then was assigned as Company D 8th Virginia Cavalry, CSA under Col. Albert G. Jenkins. — Map (db m124164) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — “Legend of the Mothman”
On a chilly, fall night in November 1966, two young couples drove into the TNT area north of Point Pleasant, West Virginia, when they realized they were not alone. What they saw that night has evolved into one of the great mysteries of all . . . — Map (db m124131) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — 313 Main Street
G.W.M. Hoff built a frame opera house in 1884. In 1886 he erected a brick opera house which three years later was destroyed by fire. In 1889 he rebuilt the brick structure containing an up to date opera house with a seating capacity of 800. It also . . . — Map (db m125576) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — 330 Main Street
R. S. Bickel had this building constructed around 1875. The Merchants National Bank occupied this structure, along with Point Club rooms, until it moved across the street to the newly constructed Spencer Hotel building. The Odd Fellows acquired the . . . — Map (db m125463) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Andrew & Charles Lewis March
The nearby highway is part of route traversing W. Va. from Lewisburg to Point Pleasant memorialized by the state to commemorate the march of the American Colonial army of 1,200 men led by Andrew & Charles Lewis. After a month’s march this . . . — Map (db m124127) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Ann BaileyHeroine of the Frontier
Here lies “Mad Ann” Bailey, heroine of the Virginia frontier. Ann Hennis came to Virginia at age 19. She married Richard Trotter who was killed at the Battle of Point Pleasant on October 10, 1774. “Mad Ann” dressed in . . . — Map (db m23878) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Boone’s Trading Post
Daniel Boone, noted scout and Indian fighter, operated trading post here, 1790. He was scout for General Lewis enroute to Point Pleasant, 1774. Named County Lieutenant for Kanawha and served in the Virginia General Assembly. — Map (db m124124) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Chief Cornstalk1727–1777
In this monument rests the remains of Keigh-tugh-qua, better known as Cornstalk to the early settlers and frontiersman. Chief Cornstalk was well known and respected by the white settlers and Indian tribes of the Ohio Valley. As chief of the Shawnees . . . — Map (db m20790) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Colonel Andrew Lewis1720 - 1781
Born October 9, 1720, in County Donegal, Ireland. The second son of John and Margaret Lynn Lewis. He served in the early campaigns on the American frontier. Wounded at Fort Necessity in 1754. Commanded the Big Sandy Expedition in 1756. With Forbes . . . — Map (db m20791) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Daniel Haymond Polsley
Born 1803 in Palatine, Polsley was a noted lawyer and publisher of the Western Transcript in Wellsburg until he moved to Mason County in 1845. A delegate to the Wheeling conventions, Polsley served in the Restored Government of Virginia . . . — Map (db m125301) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Dr. Jesse Bennett
Grave and home (½ mile west) of Dr. Jesse Bennett, whose Caesarean operation on his wife, 1794, was the first in America. Bennett, colonel of Virginia Militia, 1804–1814, refused to aid Blennerhassett and Burr in their ambitious plan. — Map (db m125229) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Early Graves
In Point Pleasant Cemetery are graves of John Roush and John Roseberry, Revolutionary War soldiers, Major Andres Waggener, hero of Craney Island in the War of 1812, and others who were prominent in early history. — Map (db m125047) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Fort Robinson
Near here stood the blockhouse built by Captain Isaac Robinson in 1794. Indians attacked the fort soon after its erection but the little garrison drove them away. Robinson spent 12 years as an Indian captive and was a noted border scout. — Map (db m125014) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — French Leaden PlateWashed out at Point Pleasant 1849, Planted 1749.
Original French Version: Lan 1749 du règne de Louis XV Roy de France nous Céloron commandant d’un détachement envoie par monsieur le Mis de la Galissoniere commandant général de la Nouvelle France pour rétablir la tranquillité dans . . . — Map (db m42653) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — George Rogers Clark
From the Kanawha’s mouth in May, 1778, George Rogers Clark set out to attack the British at Vicennes and Kaskaskia. The conquest of the Northwest by his little army of 175 men is ranked among the greatest exploits of all history — Map (db m124201) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Historic Lowe HotelCorner of Fourth and Main Street
The Mutual Realty Company had this Cleveland berea stone and red brick building erected and was named The Spencer Hotel in honor of Honorable J. S. Spencer as an enduring monument. The doors were opened to the Spencer Hotel in 1904. A barbershop, . . . — Map (db m125461) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Historic Point Pleasant
Scene of first battle, American Revolution, Oct. 10, 1774. Site of Washington’s Camp, 1770. Site of Fort Randolph, 1776 — Map (db m124167) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — John Hall
Born 1805 in Ireland but moved to Mason County as a child. He served as sheriff and in both houses of Virginia legislature. Delegate to the first Wheeling convention, he was elected president of the first constitutional convention, serving 1861-62 . . . — Map (db m125016) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Kellian V. Whaley
Born May 6, 1821, Whaley served as a Union recruiter and colonel in the 9th WV Volunteer Infantry. He was captured November 10, 1861, in Guyandotte during the battle there but escaped. First elected to the U.S. Congress in 1861, in 1863 he became . . . — Map (db m125031) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Livia S. Poffenbarger
Livia Nye Simpson, born 1 March 1862, was among youngest female publishers in US with purchase of the Point Pleasant State Gazette in 1888. Organized a DAR chapter in 1901; lobbied for state purchase of Point Pleasant battlefield; and . . . — Map (db m125330) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Point Pleasant
(side one) About 1771 was proposed as the capital of a new colony, “Vandalia.” It was visited by early explorers: La Salle, 1669; Celeron, 1749; Gist, 1750; and Washington, 1770. Daniel Boone had a trading post here. . . . — Map (db m42651) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Point Pleasant Battle / War of 1812
Point Pleasant Battle. Here, Oct. 10, 1774, General Andrew Lewis and a thousand Virginia riflemen defeated the federated Indian tribes led by Cornstalk. Known as the "first battle of the Revolution." It was the most important battle between . . . — Map (db m42652) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Revolutionary SoldiersBuried in Mason County, West Virginia — Graves Known and Unknown Outside Tu-Endie-Wei Park
In memory of Revolutionary Soldiers buried in Mason County, West Virginia. Graves known and unknown outside Tu-Endie-Wei Park. Akerd (Eckerd) Andrew • Aleshite (Aleshire), John C. • Arbuckle, William • Bumgardner, David • Bryan, James . . . — Map (db m125375) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Seventh Street
This was the battle line for the Battle of Point Pleasant, October 10, 1774. Chief Cornstalk's camp was north near Oldtown Creek. General Andrew Lewis' camp was south, at what is now known as Tu-Endie-Wei State Park. — Map (db m126433) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Silver Bridge Collapse
Constructed in 1928, connected Point Pleasant and Kanauga, OH. Name credited to aluminum-colored paint used. First eye-bar suspension bridge of its type in the U.S. Rush hour collapse on 15 December 1967, resulted in 31 vehicles falling into the . . . — Map (db m124202) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — Site of Silver Bridge Collapse
Site of Silver Bridge Collapse when 46 lives were lost Dec. 15, 1967 Mayor John C. Musgrave City Clerk Patty Burdette City Council Jack L. Fowler • Harry N. Rhodes Russell V. Holland • Leonard F. Riffle Howard Lee Miller . . . — Map (db m42654) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — The Battle of Point PleasantThe Chief Event of Lord Dunmore's War — Point Pleasant Battle Monument
[Front Plaque, Facing East.] This monument was erected in the year 1909 in commemoration of the Battle of Point Pleasant, fought at the mouth of the Great Kanawha River, now in West Virginia, October 10, 1774. Between twelve hundred and . . . — Map (db m22553) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — The Magazine
[Top Inscription on Marker] Dedicated to those militiamen who were buried in the magazine and the surrounding battlefield on OCTOBER 11, 1774 Col. Charles Lewis, Col. John Field, Capt. Thomas Buford, Cpt. Robert McClenachan, . . . — Map (db m20797) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — The Mansion House
The “Mansion House” was built in 1796 by Walter Newman for a tavern. It was the first hewn log house in the Kanawha Valley and was made entirely by hand. Later it was enlarged and in 1901 the Daughters of the American Revolution aided by . . . — Map (db m125374) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — The Sallie Marmet Anchor
In August of 1925, while steaming into the port of Cincinnati, the boat Sallie Marmet hit and sunk on this anchor. The anchor was then raised by diver Tom McGuffin and brought to Point Pleasant, where it was placed against the park flagpole . . . — Map (db m125418) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — War of 1812
On October 20, 1812, the western Virginia Brigade of Militia under command of General Joel Leftwich, embarked here for the Ohio frontier to join the Northwestern Army for service in the Second War with England. — Map (db m20795) HM
West Virginia (Mason County), Point Pleasant — West Virginia / Ohio(Mason County) /
West Virginia (Mason County). "The Mountain State" - western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia until June 20, 1863. Settled by the Germans and Scotch-Irish. It became a line of defense between the English and French during the French and . . . — Map (db m42650) HM

42 markers matched your search criteria.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.