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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

McKinley County New Mexico Historical Markers

 
Chaco Cliffs Marker image, Touch for more information
By Maribeth Robison, May 15, 2018
Chaco Cliffs Marker
New Mexico (McKinley County), Church Rock — Chaco Cliffs
Great cliffs of red sandstone form the southern boundary of the San Juan basin. The strata that are exposed here are the gently upturned edge of the structural basin which contains coal, uranium, oil and gas resources. The Zuni mountains to the . . . — Map (db m124576) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Gallup — GallupPopulation 18,161 - Elevation 6600 ft
Long a major trading center for the Navajo and Zuni Indians living in communities north and south of the town. Gallup emerged in 1881 from a railroad construction camp. It is named for David Gallup, who in 1880 was paymaster for the Atlantic & . . . — Map (db m36541) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Gallup — In Memory of All Vietnam Veterans
This memorial was erected in memory of the young individuals who went to war as kids and lost their youthful dreams, and some their lives, for a cause – freedom and honor – and came back as men with the horrors of war instilled in every . . . — Map (db m36559) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Gallup — Long Walk HomeRichard K. Yazzie, Muralist, 2005
In 1864 during a period of destabilization among U.S. settlers, Spanish inhabitants and Native Americans, the Navajo and some Apache were singled out by the U.S. government as responsible for raiding. Thousands of Navajo people were forcibly marched . . . — Map (db m148698) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Gallup — Navajo Code TalkersDeparture — May 4, 1942 —
29 Marines prepare to depart during World War II — Map (db m36558) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Gallup — Navajo Code Talkers' Mural
This mural shows the Navajo Code Talkers, U.S. Marines in World War II, who defended this country with the sacred Navajo language, bringing the Code Alphabet home from war to the future generations as a symbol to perpetuate the Navajo language and . . . — Map (db m148699) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Gallup — Women's Multicultural MuralErica Rae Sykes, Muralist, 2005
Centuries before Gallup's founding in 1881 this was a region of interweaving native cultures, Navajo, Hopi and Zuni. Resources of coal, timber, railroads and trading attracted settlers who created a city of increasing cultural diversity. We . . . — Map (db m148758) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Gallup — ZuniGeddy Epaloose, Muralist, 2005
The Zuni Pueblo is 40 miles south of Gallup. Zuni land-use area, which included what is now Gallup, has been inhabited since 1,000 BC. By 1350 AD agriculture was fully developed and there were approximately 36 active Zuni pueblos. The Spanish . . . — Map (db m148701) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Red Rock — Fort Wingate
The first Fort Wingate was established near San Rafael in 1862, to serve as the base of Col. Kit Carson's campaigns against the Navajos. In 1868 the garrison was transferred to the second Fort Wingate near Gallup. In that same year, the Navajos . . . — Map (db m36538) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Zuni — Pueblo of Zuni
The six original Zuni pueblos were the legendary "Seven Cities of Cibola" sought by Vasquez de Coronado in 1540. They were abandoned during the Pueblo Revolt, and the present pueblo was settled in 1699 after the Spanish reconquest. In 1970 Zuni . . . — Map (db m36582) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Zuni — Pueblo of Zuni
The six original Zuni pueblos were the legendary "Seven Cities of Cibola" sought by Vasquez de Coronado in 1540. They were abandoned during the Pueblo Revolt, and the present pueblo was settled in 1699 after the Spanish reconquest. In 1970 Zuni . . . — Map (db m36584) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Zuni — Zuni Olla Maidens - Zuni Pueblo
The Zuni Olla Maidens are an all-women's group renowned for their skill and ability to balance fragile water jars or ollas on their heads. Historically, Zuni women collected water in ollas from nearby springs for everyday use. Today, they perform in . . . — Map (db m36580) HM

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May. 26, 2020