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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Morgan County Illinois Historical Markers

 
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By Beverly Pfingsten, June 10, 2012
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Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — 1858 Senate Race Here
Abraham Lincoln and incumbent Stephen A. Douglas spent ten weeks in 1858, contesting for the U.S. Senate. During the grueling campaign, Lincoln made sixty-three speeches across the state; Douglas made 130. Both men spoke separately in . . . — Map (db m57637) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Big Eli Wheel No. 17
"I have discovered the machine I want to design and build, a portable 'Ferris Wheel'", W. E. Sullivan, 1893.

A young man's dream became reality when W. E. Sullivan of Roodhouse, Illinois, designed and built a small, portable, revolving wheel, . . . — Map (db m57658) HM

Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Greene Vardiman Black
G.V. Black, father of modern dentistry, was born in 1836 on a farm near Winchester, Illinois. He studied medicine and dentistry and in 1857 began his practice of dentistry in Winchester. After serving in the Civil War, he resumed dental practice in . . . — Map (db m57631) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — I. C. Honors Mr. Lincoln
Since 1856, Beecher Hall has been the headquarters of two of Illinois College men's societies. Sigma Pi Society and Phi Alpha Society. Both societies elected Abraham Lincoln into honorary membership in their fraternal-literary . . . — Map (db m57657) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Lincoln & Governor Duncan
Abraham Lincoln won his elected office, a seat in the Illinois House of Representatives in 1834. That same year Joseph Duncan of Jacksonville was elected Governor of Illinois. Before you stands the home of Joseph Duncan, which became the . . . — Map (db m57650) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Lincoln and Grierson
Abraham Lincoln met Benjamin H. Grierson when the two campaigned for the Republican Party. Grierson, a merchant, music teacher, and musician, even wrote a song for Lincoln's presidential campaign in 1860, with the chorus: "So clear . . . — Map (db m57635) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Lincoln and Jaquess
Abraham Lincoln met the Reverend James F. Jaquess when Lincoln was a lawyer on the Eighth Judicial Circuit and Jaquess rode the Petersburg Circuit for the Methodist Church. They became better acquainted in Jacksonville when Jaquess was . . . — Map (db m57630) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Lincoln and Slavery
Pictured in the crowd listening to Abraham Lincoln's speech is Joseph O. King, a prominent merchant who later became mayor of Jacksonville. He helped found a political group that agitated for the exclusion of slavery from the free . . . — Map (db m57653) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Lincoln's Religion
Abraham Lincoln was often accused by his detractors---and even by some of his friends---of not being a Christian. Just before becoming President, Lincoln shared the following with his friend Dr. Newton Bateman: "I know there is a God, . . . — Map (db m57648) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — The Civil War Governor
Richard Yates moved from Kentucky to Jacksonville in 1831. Four years later he became the first graduate of Illinois College. Abraham Lincoln and Yates admired Henry Clay and actively supported the Whig Party. Both strongly opposed . . . — Map (db m57633) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Whig Rivals and Friends
A native of Kentucky, John J. Hardin moved to Jacksonville in 1831 when he was twenty-one. Like other young men of their generation. Hardin and Abraham Lincoln served in the Black Hawk War. Both men were lawyers and Whig politicians who . . . — Map (db m57634) HM

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