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Washington District of Columbia Historical Markers

1953 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 1753
 
Crossroads Create Community Marker image, Touch for more information
By Devry Becker Jones, February 29, 2020
Crossroads Create Community Marker
District of Columbia (Washington), 16th Street Heights — 4 — Crossroads Create Community — Battleground to Community — Brightwood Heritage Trail —
The Grand, Neo-classical Revival style building that you see across Georgia Avenue north of Missouri opened in 1925 as the Bank of Brightwood, thanks to efforts of the Brightwood Citizens Association. Designed by Treasury Department architect . . . — Map (db m72818) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), 16th Street Heights — 3 — Hold the Mayo! — Battleground to Community — Brightwood Heritage Trail —
English, Irish and German settlers, as well as enslaved and free African Americans, were the first non-natives to claim Brightwood. Farmers dominated until the Civil War. Then in the 1890s electric streetcars allowed government workers to live . . . — Map (db m121018) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), 16th Street Heights — Jones-Haywood School of Ballet — African American Heritage Trail, Washington DC — 1200 Delafield Place, NW —
The Jones Haywood School of Ballet was founded here by Doris W. Jones and Claire H. Haywood in 1941. Their Capitol Ballet Company, established in 1961, remained the nation's only predominantly African American, professional ballet troupe through the . . . — Map (db m65511) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), 16th Street Heights — 2 — Mayor Emery and the Union Army — Battleground to Community — Brightwood Heritage Trail —
The City Park across the street was once Emery Place, the summer estate of Matthew Gault Emery. A prominent builder, Emery was Washington City's last elected mayor during the period of home rule. He was succeeded in 1874 by a . . . — Map (db m72816) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), 16th Street Heights — 1 — Racing at Brightwood — Battleground to Community — Brightwood Heritage Trail —
Fresh Water Springs in this pleasant high ground once drew European settlers. Farmers called the area "Crystal Spring." In 1859 the half-mile Crystal Spring Racetrack opened on land to your left. For 75 cents, Washingtonians hopped a . . . — Map (db m109288) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), 16th Street Heights — The Former Engine Co 24 of the District of Columbia Fire Department
The facade of the original house for Engine Company 24 was located at 3702 Georgia Avenue, N.W. just north of this site. Built in 1911, the firehouse was designed by Luther Leisenring and Charles Gregg. It originally housed horses and horse-drawn . . . — Map (db m149476) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 10 — "Suburban" Development — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
By the 1890s the Rock Creek Railway Company's new electric streetcars made it easy to commute across town. The "country" settlements of this area became "suburban." One streetcar line followed 18th to Calvert Street, passed here, and then . . . — Map (db m130701) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — A People Without Murals Is A Demuralized People
Painted in 1977, A People Without Murals Is A Demuralized People is the oldest and only mural remaining in Adams Morgan created by a group of Latino immigrant artists. It was brought back to life in 2005 by Sol & Soul, a D.C. . . . — Map (db m112851) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 5 — Ambassadors of Faith — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
Three dramatic religious structures dominate this corner. They are among some 40 religious institutions lining 16th Street between the White House and the Maryland state line. Many serve as unofficial “embassies” representing . . . — Map (db m152206) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Archaeology in Adams Morgan — Surveying the Cemeteries in Walter Pierce Park, 2005-2013
In 2013, Howard University archaeologists, working with concerned citizens, completed a seven-year survey of Walter C. Pierce Community Park. Their goal: to identify and protect two 19th Century cemeteries--the Colored Union Benevolent . . . — Map (db m112588) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Ballades — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'Everyone saw in this music, as in the clouds, something different for himself' — Fιlicien Mallefille Chopin created the genre of the piano ballade. Before Chopin, the name ballad referred in music not to works for solo piano, but to . . . — Map (db m150239) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 16 — Building a Better Neighborhood — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
Across the street you can see the Marie H. Reed Community Learning Center. It opened in 1977 on the former sites of Morgan Community School and Happy Hollow Playground. Both the Adams and Morgan elementary schools became "community schools" . . . — Map (db m130703) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Calvin T.S. Brent Residence — African American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1700 V Street, NW —
Calvin T.S. Brent (1854-1899), believed to be Washington's first African American architect, lived here briefly in the early 1890s. (His other residences have been demolished.) Brent began practicing in 1875 and after a two-year apprenticeship and . . . — Map (db m129528) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania — Mrs. Henderson's Favorite Embassy — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
You are standing in front of the Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania. The Spanish Baroque style mansion is all that remains of what was once a duplex, or double, embassy building designed by George Oakley Totten for Mary Foote Henderson's . . . — Map (db m82711) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Embassy of the Republic of Poland — A Beaux-Arts Beauty — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
You are now standing in front of the longest-serving embassy building among Washington DC's more than 180 diplomatic missions: the Embassy of the Republic of Poland. Renowned architect George Oakley Totten designed the building for Mary Foote . . . — Map (db m83344) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Etudes — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'His etudes for piano are masterpieces' — Hector Berlioz Chopin's twenty-four Etudes contained in opuses 10 and 25, gathered into cohesively composed cycles of twelve pieces, and the Trois nouvelles ιtudes constitute a new . . . — Map (db m150236) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Impromptus — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'The airy mood of a moment assumes a shape and form – although it becomes a trifle, it conceals the most delicate feelings in such cheerful, playful attire' — Ferdinand Hiller on the Impromptu in A flat major, Op. 29 . . . — Map (db m150248) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Josι Martν — 1853 - 1895
Hιroe Nacional de Cuba [English translation:] National Hero of Cuba — Map (db m150252) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 7 — Lanier Heights — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
Banker Archibald McLachlen and Smithsonian Institution naturalist George Brown Goode developed Lanier Heights in the early 1890s. Goode laid out streets and encouraged Smithsonian colleagues to purchase lots. McLachlan built the elegant Ontario . . . — Map (db m130704) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 4 — Life on the Park — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
During the Civil War (1861-1865), the Union Army Carver Hospital and barracks occupied Meridian Hill. The facilities attracted African American freedom seekers looking for protection and employment. By war’s end, a Black community had put down . . . — Map (db m130705) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Lithuania's March to Freedom — Keeping a Nation Alive — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
Since 1924 this mansion has housed representatives of the Republic of Lithuania, even during the 50 years when the country was occupied by the Soviet Union. In the late 1700s, the Russian Empire annexed Lithuania's territory, ending the . . . — Map (db m82751) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Mazurkas — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'Remarkable details reside in his mazurkas, and he also found a way to render them doubly interesting, performing them without a supreme degree of softness, in a superlative piano, barely feathering the strings with the hammers' — . . . — Map (db m150241) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 2 — Meridian Hill/Malcolm X Park — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
Long before Europeans arrived, Meridian Hill was a sacred place for Native Americans. As recently as 1992, a delegation of Native Americans walked across the continent to this park to mourn the 500th anniversary of Columbus’s arrival. They were . . . — Map (db m130706) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 1 — Mrs. Henderson's Legacy — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
As you look up the hill, you can see Peter C. L’Enfant’s 1791 plan for Washington ended up here in front of you at Boundary Avenue, now Florida Avenue. Back then, when people walked or rode in horse-drawn vehicles, it was hard to climb this . . . — Map (db m130707) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Nocturns — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'unlike anything else in their overall character, backfilled by the name of the works, nocturne, not admitting of tones in any colours other than dreamy, dark.' — Gottfried Wilhelm Fink The nocturn is a genre often identified with . . . — Map (db m150246) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 89001744 — Park Tower
Park Tower 2440 Sixteenth Street, NW Built 1928 has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m132726) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Polish-U.S. Diplomatic Relations — History Lives — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
When Poland declared its independence in 1918 after 123 years or foreign partition, the first prime minister of independent Poland — Ignacy Jan Paderewski — sent Prince Kazimierz Lubomirski to Washington as the country's first . . . — Map (db m82636) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Polonaises — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'They enclose the noblest traditional sentiments of Old Poland. […] They mainly contain a combative element, but the courage and valour are tinged with serenity – a characteristic property of this knightly nation' — Ferenc Liszt . . . — Map (db m150240) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Preludes — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'If Chopin had composed nothing but the preludes, he would still deserve immortality' — Anton Rubinstein Copin completed his 24 Preludes, Op. 28 in the years 1838-1839, but the ideas probably date back to earlier years, possibly even . . . — Map (db m150244) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — President Reagan Assassination Attempt — National Historic Place
On March 30, 1981, President Ronald Reagan marked the 100th visit to Washington Hilton by a sitting U.S. President. Reagan had been invited to speak in the International Ballroom at a meeting of the North America's Building Trades Unions. Upon . . . — Map (db m93218) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 14 — Rooms With a View — Roads to Diversity — Adams-Morgan Heritage Trail —
This hill, with its sweeping views of Washington and the Potomac, has tantalized visionaries since the 1800s. But few of their plans have been built. In 1873 businessman and city commissioner Thomas P. Morgan (whose name survives as part of . . . — Map (db m93415) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Scherzos — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'How should gravity array itself when jest is already darkly robed?' — Robert Schumann In the tradition of the genre, the scherzo, which in Italian means 'joke', altered in terms of forms and function, although it retained its . . . — Map (db m150238) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 8 — Serving the Neighborhood — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
Furs by Gartenhaus and truffles by Avignon Freres. Hand-crafted ice cream from Budd's. Beginning in the 1910s, such neighborhood favorites occupied the commercial buildings to your right developed by Sanner and Barr. These fashionable shops . . . — Map (db m130708) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Soldiers and Sailors Buried at Mt. Pleasant Plains Cemetery, 1870-1890 — (Walter Pierce Park)
"I knew him when he was drafted for the war, and I knew him when he came back ... He had a soldier's clothes on when he came back, with a gun, canteen, knap sack and blanket."-- Lloyd Mudd, testifying to U.S. Pension officials about Enoch . . . — Map (db m112866) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Sonatas — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'Music it is not' — Robert Schumann on the finale of the Sonata in B flat minor Chopin composed four sonatas over the course of twenty years. They differ in both musical language and forces (the first three are for solo piano, while . . . — Map (db m150243) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Songs — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'Now the little songster, Lost to vision mortal, Earth's lament unending Bears to Heav'n's bright portal' — Stefan Witwicki, except from the song 'Wiosna' ('Spring') Chopin invested his nineteen extant songs for voice and . . . — Map (db m150249) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — The ›Duke‹ Ellington Memorial Bridge
Named in honor of Edward Kennedy Ellington 1899-1974 Native Son Composer - Performer - Playwright International Statesman of Goodwill — Map (db m67913) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 18 — The Artistic Life — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
The lively scene around you began with an arts movement in the 1950s. Musicians, dancers, and artists found centrally located 18th Street attractive as declining rents made it affordable. Early on, jazz guitarist Charlie Byrd brought fame . . . — Map (db m152207) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — The Envoy
The Envoy is a designated D.C. Landmark and is placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Department of the Interior Built -- 1916 Restored -- 1981 — Map (db m135080) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 6 — The Latino Community — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
This is the heart of Washington’s Latino community. Once centered here and in nearby Mount Pleasant and Columbia Heights, the community now extends throughout the region. As early as the 1910s, the Mexican, Ecuadoran, Cuban, and Spanish . . . — Map (db m130709) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — The Ontario Theater — Celebration Through Preservation
1950s This building was the site of Washington's Ontario Theatre, a local cinema that played a notable part in the area's history. Accomplished theater architect John J. Zink, best known for designing the art deco Uptown Theater in . . . — Map (db m114770) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 3 — The Roots of Reed-Cooke — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
In 1947, the building on your left opened as the National Arena, a public roller rink and bowling alley. It also hosted professional wrestling, roller derbies, and rock concerts. In 1986 it became the Citadel Motion Picture Center, where . . . — Map (db m130710) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 9 — Tragedy at 18th and Columbia — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
Before there was "Adams Morgan," this crossroads lent the neighborhood its name: "18th and Columbia." Here you could catch a streetcar to just about anywhere and buy nearly anything. But back in 1922, 18th and Columbia witnessed a tragedy. . . . — Map (db m130711) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 17 — Urban Renewal Era — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
The charming Victorian rowhouses you see along 18th Street are an Adams Morgan signature. But they were nearly lost in the 1960s in the name of progress. During World War II, thousands flooded Washington to work for the government, . . . — Map (db m130712) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 11 — Walter Pierce Park — Roads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
The Rock Creek Valley, once home to Native Americans, had attracted European settlers by 1703. Before he became president in 1825, John Quincy Adams purchased Adams Mills on Rock Creek from his cousin. The mills, just down the hill, processed . . . — Map (db m130713) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Waltzes — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'Aristocratic from the first note to the last' — Robert Schumann Only eight Chopin waltzes were intended by the composer for publication. They include both striking concert waltzes of the brillant type and also sentimental . . . — Map (db m150242) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Works For Piano And Orchestra — Fryderyk Chopin — Creation —
'Among his new works is to be a Concerto in F minor, worthy of standing alongside works by the foremost musicians of Europe' — Eugeniusz Koźmian All of Chopin's works with orchestra represented a sort of portfolio accompanying . . . — Map (db m150251) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 12 — A Spirit of Community — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
Episcopalians first gathered here to worship in 1874, when St. Alban's Church, located on Wisconsin Avenue and Massachusetts, started a mission for the area. In good weather, services took place under a majestic oak tree on land donated by . . . — Map (db m130927) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 17 — American University — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
Beyond Ward Circle to your left is the campus of American University, chartered by Congress in 1893. Methodist Bishop John Fletcher Hurst guided the university’s development as a center for training future public servants. With its schools in . . . — Map (db m130932) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 1 — Beer, Popcorn, and Penny Candy — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
Suburban shopping arrived in Tenleytown when Sears, Roebuck & Co. erected a Moderne style store here in 1941. The sleek faηade demonstrated the latest in department store design. Sears was the second Tenleytown business — after Giant . . . — Map (db m130918) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — Churches and Cemeteries — Tenleytown, DC — Country Village to City Neighborhood —
One of the oldest churches in Tenleytown is the Eldbrooke United Methodist Church located on River Road. This church was founded in 1840 as the Mount Zion Methodist Church. Some of Tenleytown's earliest inhabitants are buried in The Methodist . . . — Map (db m112176) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — Early Commerce — Tenleytown, DC — Country Village to City Neighborhood —
In the 1700s and 1800s Tenleytown's origin as a crossroad generated numerous commercial activities, such as tobacco trade, farms, dairies, and slaughterhouses, along with the "Tennallytown" Tavern. Murdock Mill Road led from Tenleytown to an early . . . — Map (db m112178) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — Early Inhabitants — Tenleytown, DC — Country Village to City Neighborhood —
As an early country village, Tenleytown inhabitants held occupations such as farmers, millers, tavern owners and shopkeepers. Since horses provided the primary method of transportation until the early 1900s, blacksmithing was a popular occupation in . . . — Map (db m112179) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 15 — For the Children — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
From 1927 until the late 1950s, the landscaped grounds across the street were the Hillcrest Children’s Center. It was founded downtown in 1814 as the Washington City Orphan Asylum by Marcia Burnes Van Ness and President Madison’s wife Dolley. . . . — Map (db m130930) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — Fort Bayard
Civil War Defenses of Washington 1861-1865. No visible evidence remains of Fort Bayard, which stood at the top of this hill. Named for Brig. Gen. George Bayard, mortally wounded at the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 13, 1862. — Map (db m124) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — General Artemas Ward Monument — 1727–1800
Son of Massachusetts • Graduate of Harvard College • Judge and legislator • Delegate 1780–1781 to the Continental Congress • Soldier of three wars • First commander of patriot forces. — Map (db m48362) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 7 — In Touch with the World — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
“Tenley Tower,” behind you, dates from the mid-1940s. Western Union Telegraph Co. built it as part of an experimental system using microwaves to transmit telegrams in the mid-Atlantic region. This new technology helped erase . . . — Map (db m130925) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 18 — Live on Our Stage! — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
When NBC radio and television and its local affiliate, WRC, moved to these new headquarters in 1958, the average TV screen measured 12 inches. The facility opened with six studios—three TV and three radio. Soon history happened here. . . . — Map (db m47866) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — Luis Alves De Lima E Silva
Luis Alves de Lima e Silva Duke of Caxias Marshal, hero and patron of the undefeated Brazilian Army. — Map (db m129203) WM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 14 — On the Circle — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
In the 1930s city engineers created Tenley Circle where commuters heading cross-town or downtown changed streetcars. Across the street and to the left of Tenley Circle, a surviving strip of historic Grant Road meets Wisconsin Avenue. In the . . . — Map (db m130929) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 10 — Set in Stone — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Heritage Trail —
You are standing on the west side of Mt. Airy, a subdivision spanning Wisconsin Avenue laid out in the late 1890s. Mt. Airy evolved into a dense, working-class neighborhood, where policemen and dairymen lived in modest houses. Among them . . . — Map (db m130926) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — The National Presbyterian Church
Established on the foundation of The Church of the Covenant and The First Presbyterian Church The Church of the Covenant was organized in 1883 and since 1885 has worshipped in this edifice The First Presbyterian . . . — Map (db m130036) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 13 — To the Rescue — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
The brick building across the street opened in 1928 as the Convent of Bon Secours (literally, “good help”). The convent’s sisters had arrived in Baltimore from France in 1881. In Baltimore they quietly nursed both wealthy and needy . . . — Map (db m130928) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 16 — Winning the War — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
The U.S. Navy arrived across the street at 3801 Nebraska Avenue during World War II, taking the Colonial style red-brick campus of Mount Vernon Seminary for secret “essential wartime activities.” Soon more than 5,000 workers . . . — Map (db m130931) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — World War I Memorial
To the Glory of God and in loving memory of the men of the Church of the Covenant who gave their lives in the Great War William Strong Jr Lieutenant January 1915 Expeditionary Force Enlisted at Toronto • Gassed at . . . — Map (db m130035) WM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — World War I Memorial
In reverent memory of Alan Ogilvie Clephane Elias Quereau Horton Guy Wilkinson Stuart Castle who willingly gave their lives for their country in the World War This memorial is erected by The Society of Colonial Wars . . . — Map (db m130125) WM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — World War II Memorial
In honored memory of the men of this congregation who gave their lives for their country in the War 1941 - 1945 Samuel Kendall Angus, U.S.A. Charles Stone Borden, A.A.F. David Rumbough Donaldson, U.S.A. William B. Drysdale, . . . — Map (db m130124) WM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 13 — A Neighborhood Oasis — An East-of-the-River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
Follow Good Hope Road under the highway to your left to reach Anacostia Park, a longtime neighborhood oasis. In 1914, after years of citizen requests, Congress directed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to "improve" the Anacostia River by . . . — Map (db m130717) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 14 — Booth's Escape — An East-of-the-River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
Late On The Night Of April 14, 1865, a guard at the other end of the Navy Yard Bridge allowed a young man on horseback to cross, despite a wartime curfew. Unbeknownst to the guard, the rider, John Wilkes Booth, had just shot President Abraham . . . — Map (db m100715) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 10 — Crossing Lines — An East-of-the-River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
Across the street is the former 11th Precinct Police Station. In 1993 it became the Max Robinson Center for Health and Living, providing services for people with HIV/AIDS. Whether by design or by accident, in 1910 the city built . . . — Map (db m100763) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — Fort Stanton — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861 – 1865 —
Earthworks of Fort Stanton are visible in the wooded area 200 yards in front of you. Diagram: Fort Stanton from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawing. Fort Stanton was named for Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, was the first fort . . . — Map (db m46623) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — Frederick Douglass National Historic Site
Also known as Cedar Hill, this site encompasses the estate owned by Frederick Douglass from 1877 until his death in 1895. In honor of Douglass’ work as an author, orator, abolitionist, statesman, and civil rights leader, this site is designated a . . . — Map (db m40846) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — Frederick Douglass's Rustic Retreat — Frederick Douglass National Historic Site — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Where do you go when you do not want to be disturbed? Frederick Douglass came to this tiny stone cabin that he called the Growlery. Coined by Charles Dickens, the word "Growlery" literally means a place to growl. Douglass kept his Growlery . . . — Map (db m130979) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 19 — Mother Churches and Their Daughters — An East-of-the-River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
Across This Intersection is St. Teresa of Avila, the first Catholic Church east of the Anacostia River. It is called the “mother church” because many area congregations are its offshoots. As Uniontown grew, so did its Catholic . . . — Map (db m130719) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 20 — Rose's Row — An East-of-the-River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
Across the intersection to your left is Rose's Row, three one-family and three two-family houses built in 1890 by local saloon-keeper William H. Rose. Rose's son Daniel designed them in the popular Italianate style and carefully crafted a . . . — Map (db m130720) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — The Big Chair — Re-dedication April 25, 2006
This community landmark represents the Curtis Companies long standing allegience to the neighborhood and steadfast committment to unity, prosperity and good will to all Washingtonians and friends of Anacostia. Designers: John . . . — Map (db m5446) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 12 — The Big Chair — An East-of-the-River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
This Anacostia icon once marked the entrance to Curtis Brothers Furniture Co. The business dated to 1926, when young Fred and George Curtis acquired a Model T Ford truck to deliver ice, then progressed to moving furniture. They soon rented a . . . — Map (db m100690) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — The Growlery
Here stood Frederick Douglass’ rustic retreat from domestic society, where he could think, read and write undisturbed. Evoking the image of a lion’s lair, he called his hideaway the Growlery. It was simply furnished with a lounge, a high desk and a . . . — Map (db m5362) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 18 — The Sage of Anacostia — An East-of-the River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
This imposing property once belonged to Anacostia’s most famous resident: Frederick Douglass. After escaping slavery as a young man, Douglass rose to become a distinguished abolitionist, writer, publisher, and orator. By the 1860s Douglass was . . . — Map (db m88723) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — The World’s Largest Chair
Presented to Curtis Bros. for their outstanding leadership and service to the public by the Basset Furniture Industries. The chair made of solid Honduras mahogany is 19½ feet tall and weighs 4600 pounds. Designer: . . . — Map (db m5459) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — Thurgood Marshall
Real Justice The Spirit of Thurgood Marshall 7-2-08 to 1-24-98 I still believe firmly that the right will win out. Justice for all people, regardless of race, creed or color. The long-time NAACP lawyer who argued successfully in . . . — Map (db m88468) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 11 — Transit and Trade — An East-of-the-River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
The arrival of modern transportation after the Civil War transformed Anacostia. The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad opened a branch line along the river here in 1874, brining industry. Two years later businessman and developer Henry Griswold launched . . . — Map (db m130721) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 17 — Uniontown, DC's First Suburb — East-of-the-River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
Today's Anacostia Historic District began in 1854 as Uniontown, Washington's first planned suburb. The Union Land Association saw the large Navy Yard workforce across the Anacostia River as potential customers for building lots they carved out . . . — Map (db m95972) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia Park — Armaments & Aircraft
The Washington Navy Yard is the oldest establishment of the U.S. Navy. It was the scene of many scientific developments including a ship model testing basin that evaluated the effect of water on new hull designs. The first shipboard aircraft . . . — Map (db m141714) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia Park — Flora & Fauna
Over the past 400 years, the Anacostia watershed has changed from a lush, diverse ecosystem to one shaped by trade, agriculture and a rapidly expanding population. In the 1700s, forests were cleared to make way for crop cultivation, which caused . . . — Map (db m141634) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia Park — Hillsdale & Frederick Douglass
The "Freedmen's Bureau" acquired 375 acres of land that was originally a tobacco plantation from the Barry Family in the late 1800's. In 1867, the land was named Hillsdale by African Americans who came to Washington in great numbers before and . . . — Map (db m141635) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia Park — Native People & Visitors
The Nacotchtank were American Indians who lived in the area now known as Washington, D.C. Also called the Necostins, their principle village was located on the eastern bank of a small river that still bears an anglicized version of their name . . . — Map (db m141633) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Acanthus mollis — Artist's Acanthus
According to Dioscorides, the root was good for treating ruptures and convulsions. It was also used as a diuretic. — Map (db m144670) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Achillea millefolium — Yarrow
Yarrow was one of the first herbs brought to America by the colonists. Its leaves were used to stop the flow of blood on cuts and bruises and to deaden the pain. — Map (db m144642) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Acorus calamus — Sweet Flag
The Penobscot tribe of Maine believed this plant to have protective powers; they chewed a piece of the aromatic root to ward off disease when traveling or used steam from the root to prevent illness. — Map (db m144624) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Anethum graveolens — Dill
Although used to flavor food, dill was also eaten to help calm upset stomachs and indigestion, especially in children. Seeds were used in pickling and to flavor vinegar. — Map (db m144643) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Apocynum cannabinum — Indian Hemp
Native Americans used the stalk for fiber in the same way Europeans used their hemp plant, Cannabis sativa. Indian Hemp is superior, however, because it is stronger and lasts longer. This herb is poisonous. — Map (db m144567) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Artemisia abrotanum — Southernwood
Artemisia abrotanum hung in courtrooms was thought to stop the spread of disease. It was also used in kitchens to keep bad odors away. Pennsylvania Germans used southernwood in their pantries to repel ants. — Map (db m145047) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Artemisia absinthium — Wormwood
This plant was spread across floors and put in between clothes in dressers to repel insects and moths. The plant was thought to prevent disease, as well as expel worms. — Map (db m144556) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Arum maculatum — Lords-and-Ladies
The juice, mixed with oil, stopped earaches and destroyed nasal polyps. It was also used to treat certain cancers and abortion. Drunk with wine, it was an aphrodisiac. The plant is injurious. — Map (db m144661) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Asarum canadense — Wild Ginger
The Chippewa used this herb to season food and chewed the root to relieve indigestion. The Iroquois used the roots to preserve meats. — Map (db m144574) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Asclepias tuberosa — Butterfly Weed
This plant was one of the most important medicines of the Menomini. The pulverized root was used for cuts and wounds, and was mixed with other roots for additional cures. This herb is potentially toxic if taken internally. — Map (db m144617) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ballota nigra — Black Horehound
Dioscorides reported that the leaves were applied with salt to dog bites, with honey to clean ulcers, and that the ashes of the leaves repressed venereal warts. — Map (db m144666) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Baptistia tinctoria — Wild Indigo
The Cherokee used the leaves and woody stem to make a blue die. The Mohegan bathed their cuts and wounds with an infusion of the plant. This entire herb is toxic. — Map (db m144568) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Calendula officinalis — Pot Marigold
Brought to America by the first colonists, pot marigolds were used to flavor and color stews and cheeses. The Plymouth colony also used the flowers to dye cloth. — Map (db m144640) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Calendula officinalis — Pot Marigold
The yellow dye from the fresh or dried petals was commonly used to color butter, cheeses and puddings. The petals were also used in ancient Rome as a substitute for the more expensive saffron in coloring soups, syrups and conserves. — Map (db m144648) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Calycanthus floridus — Carolina Allspice
The Cherokee used the root of this herb to make a strong diuretic for urinary and bladder complaints. The seeds of this plant are poisonous. — Map (db m144619) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Camptotheca acuminata — Camptotheca, Chinese Happy Tree
Known as the "cancer tree", Camptotheca contains the alkaloid camptothecin that is used to treat ovarian, colorectal, and small-cell lung cancers. It has been used in China for hundreds of years to treat psoriasis and diseases of various internal . . . — Map (db m144682) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ceanothus americanus — New Jersey Tea
The Menomini believed the tea made from the roots to be a cure-all for stomach troubles. — Map (db m144607) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Cephalanthus occidentalis — Buttonbush
The Louisiana Choctaws chewed the bitter bark of this shrub to relieve toothaches. They also drank a strong decoction (extract) of it to treat diarrhea. The leaves have poisoned grazing animals. — Map (db m144625) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Chichorium intybus — chicory
During the U.S. Civil War, Confederate soldiers used roasted, ground chicory root as a substitute for coffee, which was scarce during the conflict. Still popular in the southern states, chicory is either mixed with true coffee or prepared by itself. . . . — Map (db m144436) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Cladrastis kentukea — yellowwood
The Cherokee used the wood of this tree for building and carving. Early settlers in the southern Appalachians used the root bark for dye and the yellow heartwood for gunstocks. Today, yellowwood is popular in urban settings for its resistance to . . . — Map (db m144694) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Comptonia peregrina — Sweet Fern
The leaves of this herb were thrown on fires by the Potawatomi of Michigan to create a smudge to deter mosquitos. The Ojibwe used the leaves for a tea to cure stomach cramps. — Map (db m144611) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Corylus americana — Hazelnut
This shrub produces a sweet, edible nut. The Cherokee drank a tea made from the bark for hives. — Map (db m144570) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Crocus sativus — Saffront Crocus
The stigmas are used in yellow food coloring and flavoring. Chemical analysis of ancient linens and mummies' winding sheets confirms its use as a dye. Today, it is used more as a spice and in cosmetics than as a textile dye. — Map (db m144652) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Cunila origanoides — American Dittany
Native peoples of eastern North America drank a tea of this plant to produce sweating when treating fever and colds. — Map (db m144616) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Daucus carota spp. carota — Queen Anne’s Lace
Dioscorides noted that a drink of the seeds was a diuretic, a colic neutralizer, and brought on menses and abortion. The seeds or roots, prepared in wine, were effective in treating wounds from poisonous beasts. — Map (db m144674) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dianthus caryophyllus — Clove Pink
The flowers have a sweet, clove-like scent and were used by Greeks and Romans in the making of coronets and garlands. In medieval Arabia, they were used in perfumes. An absolute, a refined form of the essential oil, is used in top-quality perfumes . . . — Map (db m144689) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dianthus plumarius — Cottage Pink
This plant has the same sweet, spicy scent as Dianthus caryophyllus. It has been popular since Renaissance times in nosegays and as an edging plant to scent the garden. — Map (db m144687) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — 82218-H — Dioscorea villosa — wild yam
Wild yam contains diosgenin, a chemical compound that can be converted in a lab (but not in the human body) to progesterone. This discovery paved the way for the invention of the modern oral contraceptive pill. Today, wild yam is used to calm . . . — Map (db m144627) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Echinacea purpurea — Purple Coneflower
The Plains Indians considered this herb to be one of the most important medicinal plants. Its root was the universal antidote for snakebites and all kinds of venomous bites and stings. — Map (db m144605) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Echium vulgare — Viper's Bugloss
The leaves, root, and seeds were drunk in wine for the prevention or cure of snakebite. The entire plant is poisonous. — Map (db m144673) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Erianthus ravennae — Ravenna Grass
Dioscorides reported that Erianthus had much pith and was fit for making books. — Map (db m144664) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eryngium planum — Eryngo
In Dioscordes' time the young leaves of this prickly plant were pickled in brine and eaten as a pot herb. A drink of 'Eryngum' root diluted in honey liquor was said to cure epilepsy. — Map (db m144654) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Euonymus atropurpureus — Burning Bush
The Meskwaki used the fresh outer bark, pounded into a poultice (compress), to heal facial sores. They steeped the inner bark to make an eye lotion. — Map (db m144577) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eupatorium purpureum — Joe-Pye Weed
The Menomini used a decoction, or extract, of the root to treat the genitourinary tract. The Potowatomi made a poultice of fresh leaves to treat burns, and the Ojibwe bathed babies in a solution of the root to strengthen them. — Map (db m144569) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eupatorium purpureum — Boneset
The northern Iroquois used the leave to make a tea that was considered a tonic and cure for colds and fevers This herb may damage the liver. — Map (db m144612) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Galium mollugo — White Bedstraw
The roots produce reds similar to madder (Rubia tinctorum), although they are thin and yield less pigment than the thicker madder roots. The seeds of this plant were imported from France by Thomas Jefferson. — Map (db m144649) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Genista tinctoria — Dyer's Greenwood
The colonists used this plant to obtain a yellow-green dye from its flowers. The leaves, seeds and flowering plant were also used medically as a diuretic and purgative. — Map (db m144557) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Geranium maculatum — Wild Geranium
The Meskwaki of Minnesota pounded the astringent root of this geranium in an animal bladder to make a poultice for hemorrhoids. — Map (db m144596) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Gillenia trifoliata — Indian Physic
The root furnished an effective purge of the bowels and an emetic to induce vomiting. — Map (db m144626) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hedera helix — English Ivy
An infusion of the flowers in wine was drunk for dysentery, and the leaves mixed with fat were used as a burn ointment. Dioscorides believed that drinking the juice caused sterility. The leaves and berries are poisonous. — Map (db m144669) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Helenium flexuosum — Sneezeweed
According to Cherokee belief, the roots of sneezeweed and Veronica noveboracensis steeped in warm water acted as a contraceptive by preventing menstruation for two years. — Map (db m144614) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Helleborus niger — Christmas Rose
Helleborus was once used to stimulate the heart, expel worms, and promote menstrual flow. It contains cardioglycosides, which help the heart to beat regularly and strongly. Currently regarded as too strong to use safely. — Map (db m144683) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Heuchera americana — Rock Geranium
The root, a powerful astringent, was used by Choctaw, Chickasaw and Creek of the Southeast when conditions required an astringent or "puckering" medicine. — Map (db m144613) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hydrastis canadensis — Goldenseal
Native American medicinal uses of the root included treatment of the eyes and skin and for cancers and venereal diseases. The yellow root provided dye. This plant should be avoided during pregnancy. — Map (db m144572) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hydrastis canadensis — Goldenseal
Historic use for stomach ailments and inflamed eyes has been confirmed. Its antibiotic property makes it useful for vaginal infections. Its antibacterial property may help fight drug-resistant tuberculosis. — Map (db m144681) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ilex vomitoria — Yaupon
Yaupon was a common drink of the Southeastern tribes, taken mainly for its emeting (vomit-inducing) action, which was a means of purification. The fruit is poisonous. — Map (db m144604) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Indogofera tinctoria — Indigo
Fragments of indigo-dyed linen from Thebes date back to 3500 B.C. Indigo is just one type of dye in which the color develops in the textile after removal from the dye bath. Upon exposure to the air, fibers change from yellow to blue. — Map (db m144645) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Iris Χ germanica 'Florentina' — Iris
Dioscorides said that the root was fit for use against chill, chest congestion, and coughs. A poultice made with orris and roses in vinegar was said to be good for headaches. The rootstock is toxic. — Map (db m144656) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lavandula angustifolia — Lavender
The scent of lavender was much loved, and the flowers were dried and used in linens, in wash water, soaps, oils and powdered. The fragrance warded off evil smells of poor drainage and lack of sanitation. — Map (db m144679) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lindera benzoin — Spicebush
The spicy red fruit added flavor to groundhog or opossum as prepared by the Cherokee. The ground nuts also flavored bread. — Map (db m144565) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lobelia inflata — Indian Tobacco
The common name for this plant comes from its purported use as a Native American smoke. It was used by the Seneca as an emetic (vomit-inducer) and for coughs. The whole plant is poisonous. — Map (db m144621) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lychnis coronaria — Rose Campion
According to Dioscorides, the seeds drunk with wine helped those who had been bitten by a scorpion. — Map (db m144672) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — 53002-H — Magnolia virginiana — sweetbay magnolia
American Indians used the leaves of this small tree to make a medicinal tea for the treatment of chills, colds, and other ailments. Early American physicians used it as a quinine substitute as well as to treat gout, rheumatism, and respiratory . . . — Map (db m144692) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Malus 'Roxbury' — Apple
Apples were very important to the colonists. They provided a source of fruit for eating, apple butter and cider. Before cold storage, the Roxbury variety was a favorite late winter apple. — Map (db m144440) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Matthiola incana — Stock
These flowers have spicy scent similar to Dianthus, and the fragrance grows stronger at night. They are used in bouquets and potpourri, and the scent was used in early Arab and Greek perfumes. — Map (db m144691) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Mentha spicata — Spearmint
Although most commonly used by the colonists to flavor food and drink, mint was also used to whiten teeth, prevent milk from curdling and to strew on floors to repel bad smells and insects. — Map (db m144639) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Mertensia virginica — Virginia Bluebells
The Cherokee used this plant for whooping cough and consumption. — Map (db m144608) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Mitchella repens — Partridge-berry
The St. Lawrence Montagnai considered the cooked berries a fever medicine. The dried leaves were added to Chippewa smoking mixtures. — Map (db m144622) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Origanum vulgare — Oregano
This versatile herb was used by colonists to alleviate toothaches, flavor food and strew on floors, as well as flavor ale. The flowering tops were used to produce a reddish brown dye. — Map (db m144633) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Origanum vulgare — Wild Marjoram
The leaves are steam distilled to produce an oil that has a spicy, aromatic scent. The early Greeks, Egyptians, and Arabs all used it in their perfumes. Today, it appears in many perfumes and soaps, especially men's fragrances. The leaves and . . . — Map (db m144686) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum — Greek Oregano
Dioscorides reported that above-ground parts, taken with wine, were good for those who had drunk the juice of the poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) or the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). — Map (db m144663) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Osmorhiza calytonii — Sweet Cicely
Sweet Cicely roots taste and smell like anise. Oil from the roots contains sugar, fats, resins and tannin. Chippewa Indians women drank the tea of the roots to aid in childbirth. — Map (db m144601) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Osmunda cinnamomea — Cinnamon Fern
In the spring, the Menomini limited their diet to the young coiled fern tips (croziers) so that their bodies had the scent of the fern. This allowed them to get close to deer to hunt them. — Map (db m144566) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Phlomis fruticosa — Jerusalem Sage
The leaves soaked in water were laid upon swollen, inflamed eyes. Dioscorides also noted that just a knucklebone's length of the root, given with wine, could bind excessive intestinal discharges. — Map (db m144668) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Phytolacca americana — Poke
The Pamunkey of Virginia treated rheumatism with boiled poke berries. Several tribes used berry pigments as a dye. All parts of the plant are poisonous. — Map (db m144571) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Phytolacca americana — Poke
Native Americans made use of poke berries as a body paint. Later the Colonists found it an inexpensive source of red dye for woolens. Young leaves yield brilliant yellows on wool. Caution: poisonous — Map (db m144660) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Polemonium reptans — Jacob's Ladder
The roots were used by the Meskwaki Indians of Wisconsin to induce vomiting. They called the plant 'fine hair woman medicine'. — Map (db m144623) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Polygonatum biflorum — Small Solomon's Seal
This plant was called the "reviver" by the Menomini and Fox because inhaling the smoke of the heated root revived unconscious patients. — Map (db m144578) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosa virginiana — Pasture Rose
North-central Native Americans made a medicine with the rose hip skin for stomach troubles. — Map (db m144603) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosmarinus officinalis — Rosemary
Rosemary has an ancient history in the Mediterranean as an incense and perfume. It was the main ingredient in Hungary Water, one of the earliest European perfumes created for the Queen of Hungary in A.D. 1370. The scent became popular throughout . . . — Map (db m144437) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosmarinus officinalis — Rosemary
Rosemary was a favorite herb for cooking and strewing. As a symbol of remembrance and fidelity, it was added to wedding cakes and puddings, as well as tossed into coffins at funerals. — Map (db m144636) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosmarinus officinalis — rosemary
Rosemary contains several volatile oils, tannins, bittering compounds, and resins, which are thought to contribute to the increased potency and extended preservation of beers brewed with it. It has been used medicinally for centuries to improve . . . — Map (db m144695) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rubia tinctorum — Madder
Having been used since at least 2000 B.C., the reddish orange roots contain several dye substances. It was used to dye the British redcoats and was best known as the source of Turkey red on linen and cotton textiles. — Map (db m144650) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ruscus aculeatus — Butcher's Broom
According to Dioscorides, leaves and berries were drunk in wine to encourage menstruation, to break up bladder stones, and to cure jaundice and headache. This mixture could also be used as a diuretic. — Map (db m144657) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Salvia lyrata — Lyre-leaved Sage
The roots of this sage were used by Native Americans to make a salve for sores. — Map (db m144620) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Salvia sclarea — Clary Sage
Clary wine was considered an aphrodisiac in the sixteenth century. The bitter aromatic leaves flavor wine, ale, beer and liqueurs. — Map (db m144693) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Satureja douglasii — Yerba Buena
The Cahuilla of southern California believed a tea made from this plant to be an effective remedy for reducing fevers and curing colds. — Map (db m144618) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Satureja montana — Winter Savory
Colonists brought winter savory over to the new world to flavor dishes, stuffings to meat, fish and sausages. Leaves were taken to stimulate the appetite and to aid in digestion. — Map (db m144634) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Smilacina racemosa — Plumelily
Smoke from the burning root was used by the Meskwaki to revive unconscious patients, to hush a crying child, and to cast spells. — Map (db m144573) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Solidago canadensis — Canada Goldenrod
The Potowami called it "yellow top" and made a tea of the flowers to treat fevers. — Map (db m144615) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Symphytum officinale — Comfrey
A lotion or mixture of the fresh or dried leaves or roots was used for bruises, wounds and sores. — Map (db m144676) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Symphytum officinale — Comfrey
Used for thousands of years to treat bruises and sprains, the plant contains compounds, such as allantoin, that promote healing and other substances that are anti-inflammatory. There is controversy concerning its safety, especially for internal use, . . . — Map (db m144680) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Tanacetum balsamita — Costmary
This plant was used by the colonists in a favorite spring tonic known as "Sweet Mary tea." It was also widely used throughout eastern Massachusetts in nosegays or as bookmarkers to enjoy during long sermons. — Map (db m144637) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Tanacetum vulgare — Tansy
Tansy tea was taken to calm cramps, but colonists also used tansy leaves as an insect repellant in their homes. Leaves were also rubbed on fresh meats to keep flies off. — Map (db m144559) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Teucrium chamaedrys — Wall Germander
Dioscorides reported that a beverage of the fruiting plant was drunk for convulsions and coughs. It was taken with wine by those who were bitten by poisonous beasts. — Map (db m144675) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Trillium grandiflorum — Large Flowered Trillium
A decoction of the root was used for female diseases and to bring on childbirth by some tribes; others used it to treat headaches and rheumatism. — Map (db m144606) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vaccinium corymbosum — Highbush Bluberry
The Chippewa made pemmican (high-energy food) by adding dried blueberries to moose fat and deer tallow. Native Americans also made a tea of blueberry roots to treat diarrhea and to ease childbirth. — Map (db m144610) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Valeriana officinalis — Valerian
Tradition says the Pied Piper carried valerian root in his back pocket to help lure the rats out of Hamelin. The root has an offensive scent similar to Limburger cheese, but is also musky and balsamic and is used in perfumery in India and the Far . . . — Map (db m144690) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Veronicastrum virginicum — Culver's Root
The black roots contain a substance with powerful emetic (vomit-inducing) and cathartic (bowel-purging) properties which was used by the Senecas and Menomini. This root is potentially toxic. — Map (db m144602) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vinca minor — Periwinkle
Periwinkle was used by the colonists to make soothing ointments for the skin. Fresh leaves were used to stop bleeding, externally and internally. — Map (db m144555) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vinca minor — Periwinkle
Dioscorides suggested that the leaves be chewed for toothache and applied as a poultice for snakebite. He prescribed a drink of the leaves and stalks in wine for dysentery. — Map (db m144678) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vitex agnus-castus — Chaste Tree
Dioscorides noted that chaste maidens used the plant for bedding. He recommended burning leaves to fumigate venomous beasts. A poultice of the leaves relieved stings. — Map (db m144677) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Yucca filamentosa — Adam's Needle
The Native Americans had been using the leaves since time immemorial to make twine and cordage. Men on Raleigh's second voyage to Virginia in 1586 noticed its economic potential. — Map (db m144564) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Zingiber officinale — Ginger
Used as early as 3000 B.C. in China where it was prescribed for colds, fever, and leprosy, among other ailments. It was also used medicinally in ancient Greece and India. Research has identified constituents that have anti-inflammatory qualities, . . . — Map (db m144685) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — An Art Form Is Born
Over a thousand years ago, China's stunning landscape inspired its people to reproduce it in miniature. Using carefully selected rocks and plants, artists recreated the land's rugged mountains, vast horizons, and noble trees on trays and in pots. . . . — Map (db m144342) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Bonsai Pioneer — Yuji Yoshimura — (1921 - 1997) —
Yuji Yoshimura dared to do what no one had done before: He wrote the most complete practical book on bonsai in English and taught Westerners in his native Japan and in other nations to appreciate and practice this ancient art. Drawn to the potential . . . — Map (db m144340) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Branching Out
Though an ancient art in Asia, the practice of bonsai spread through the western world only in the 19th century. Today, all types of people, not just scholars and experienced masters, are learning about and practicing this living art. As artists . . . — Map (db m144348) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Capitol Columns
These 22 Corinthian sandstone columns were among 24 that were part of the east portico of the United States Capitol. Architect Charles Bullfinch oversaw construction of the portico using a design handed down by his predecessors, William Thornton and . . . — Map (db m918) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dawn Redwood from China — (Metasequoia glyptostroboides)
This small grove of Dawn Redwood is somewhat reminiscent of the few stands that occur in its native homeland, China. Known only through paleobotanical records prior to 1945, living specimens of this almost extinct plant were discovered in that year . . . — Map (db m144582) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dioscorides Garden
These herbs planted here are a representative selection from plants listed about 60 A.D by the Greek physician, Dioscorides. The modern science of pharmacology is traced back to his efforts to list systematically the plants that were used for . . . — Map (db m144439) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — If trees could talk...
...this one would tell quite a story. It has grown as a bonsai for so long that it passed through five generations of a single family of bonsai artists in Japan before crossing the ocean to live here. The Yamaki family was well known in Japan for . . . — Map (db m144347) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Medicinal Garden
This garden illustrates the historic and current use of herbs as medicine. Plants have played an integral part in illness and disease treatment for thousands of years. By observation, trial, and error, people learned which plants had healing . . . — Map (db m144438) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Morrison Azalea Garden
Assembled in this garden is a permanent collection of the Glenn Dale Hybrid Azaleas, originated, selected, and named by B. Y. Morrison, first Director of the U.S. National Arboretum. — Map (db m966) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — National Capitol Columns
The presence of the National Capitol Columns on the knoll in this meadow was the inspiration of Ethel Shields Garrett, patron and friend of the National Arboretum. It was through her vision, courage, and determination for thirty years that these . . . — Map (db m917) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Olallie Daylilies
Dr. George M. Darrow, upon retirement, devoted his life to developing tetraploid daylilies and improving diploid cultivars. His most successful efforts were aimed at obtaining very flowering daylilies using such species as Hemerocallis . . . — Map (db m145887) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Sandstone Sculptures
The sandstone base and capital are from a Corinthian column that once graced the east central portico of the United States Capitol. The columns were dismantled in 1958 to make way for the east front extension, where marble reproductions now stand. . . . — Map (db m7621) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — The Knot Garden
The formal knot expresses the traditional elegance of the garden design which originated in Europe during the 16th century. Knot garden designs are geometrically patterned on a level site with plants arranged so they may be pruned to follow a . . . — Map (db m144435) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — The Man Who Loved Conifers
Would your hobby take you to the four corners of the world? Few private plant collectors have approached their hobby with more enthusiasm than the late William Gotelli who travelled the world in search of unusual conifers, collecting more than . . . — Map (db m144583) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Timeless Trees
Centuries ago the art of cultivating trees in pots traveled across the sea from China to the island nation of Japan. There it slowly acquired a distinctively Japanese style. While the Chinese sought to capture the essence of their wilderness in . . . — Map (db m144344) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — What shape do you see? — (Hint: It is not a tree)
Most bonsai are modeled after natural trees in nature. However, about 400 years ago, it was popular in China to train potted trees into shapes of animals, especially the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac, which includes the dragon. This tree was . . . — Map (db m144343) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Atlas District — 1950 — Earl Lloyd — ULINE —
First African American to play in an NBA game — Map (db m139209) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Atlas District — 1953 — Dwight D. Eisenhower — ULINE —
President Eisenhower's First Inaugural Ball — Map (db m139210) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Atlas District — 1964 — The Beatles — ULINE —
First Concert in the USA — Map (db m139212) HM

1953 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers were listed. Next 1753
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Aug. 12, 2020