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Wayne County North Carolina Historical Markers

 
Nuclear Mishap Marker at West Main Street and North Church Street image, Touch for more information
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2013
Nuclear Mishap Marker at West Main Street and North Church Street
North Carolina (Wayne County), Eureka — F-70 — Nuclear Mishap
B-52 transporting two nuclear bombs crashed, Jan. 1961. Widespread disaster averted; three crewmen died 3 mi. S. — Map (db m64597) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — Attack of the 17th Massachusetts — Battle of Goldsborough Bridge
It was along the top of this railroad embankment that one Union regiment, the 17th Massachusetts, approached the railroad bridge one quarter mile to your left. As the men of the 17th fought their way along the top of the embankment they came under . . . — Map (db m28554) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — Battle of Goldsboro BridgeEnd of Foster’s Raid — Foster’s Raid
(Preface): Late in 1862. Union Gen. John G. Foster’s garrison was well entrenched in New Bern and made several incursions into the countryside. On December 11, Foster led a raid from New Bern to burn the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Bridge . . . — Map (db m28291) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — Battle of Goldsborough BridgeDecember 17, 1862
Nearly 15,000 men clashed on these fields December 17, 1862. At stake was the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad bridge which spanned the Neuse River here. Confederate troops, outnumbered five to one, fought bravely to defend the bridge, a vital link in . . . — Map (db m28541) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F 35 — Charles B. Aycock
Governor of North Carolina, 1901-1905. Crusader for universal education. His law office is 2 blocks S.W. — Map (db m31550) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F-61 — Cherry Hospital
Opened by state in 1880 for black citizens with mental illness. Named in 1959 for R. Gregg Cherry, governor, 1945-49. Open to all races since 1965. — Map (db m65498) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — Company E, 119th Infantry, Goldsboro Rifles World War I Monument(WWI Doughboy)
(West face) Erected by members of Company E, 119th Infantry, Goldsboro Rifles, In memory of Their comrades who gave their lives in the World War. (North face) William A. Brickwell John W. Thompson, Jr. Chas. R. . . . — Map (db m66301) WM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — Confederate Counterattack — Battle of Goldsborough Bridge
After Union troops burned the railroad bridge they began to leave the field. The Confederates decided to re-cross the river by way of a wagon bridge one half mile above the railroad and counterattack the small Union rear guard. The right wing . . . — Map (db m28583) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — First Pentecostal Holiness Church Congregation
On this Courthouse Square November 1, 1898, the First Pentecostal Holiness Church Congregation was organized with nine charter members. J.J. Street                  W.H. Huggans             I.L. Puryer                 Mr. & Mrs. E.L. . . . — Map (db m67950) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F 21 — Foster's Raid
On a raid from New Bern Union troops led by Gen. J.G. Foster attacked Goldsboro, December 17, 1862. — Map (db m31560) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F-62 — General Baptist State Convention
Statewide association of black Baptists organized, Oct. 18, 1867, at First African Baptist Church, then located 2/10 mi. W. — Map (db m66337) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F-65 — Gertrude Weil1879-1971
Advocate for extending voting rights to women, 1920; reformer active in labor, race, Jewish causes. Home was here. — Map (db m66220) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — GoldsboroMajor Rail Center
During the Civil War, Goldsboro (then spelled Goldsborough) wa an important railroad junction and a vital link in the Confederate supply chain. Here the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad, which ran from Morehead City to Raleigh, . . . — Map (db m64795) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — John Lawson
In Commemoration of John Lawson Surveyor General of the Province of Carolina and its first historian brutally murdered by the Tuscarora Indians Sept. 22, 1711 Erected by the North Carolina Society of the Colonial . . . — Map (db m67912) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F 52 — Kenneth C. Royall
Last Sec'y of War & first Sec'y of Army, 1947-49. Attorney; state senator; brig. gen., 1943-45. Led military justice reform. Home was here. — Map (db m31557) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F-51 — North Carolina Press Association
Organized May 14, 1873. J. A. Engelhard elected first president at meeting held near this spot. — Map (db m65277) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F 12 — North Carolina Railroad
Built by the State, 1851-56, from Goldsboro to Charlotte. Eastern terminus a few yards N. — Map (db m31554) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F-53 — Odd Fellows Home
Orphanage and school opened in 1892. Provided for 960 children before closing in 1971. The original 20-acre tract is now a city park. — Map (db m67578) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — Seymour Johnson AFB History / 4th Fighter Wing History Memorial
   Seymour Johnson Field, established on June 12, 1942, six months after the United States entered World War II, is named in honor of Lieutenant Seymour A. Johnson. A Goldsboro native and U.S.Navy test pilot, he was killed in an aircraft crash . . . — Map (db m66699) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F-59 — Seymour Johnson Air Force Base
Field used, 1942-46, for flight training by Army Air Forces; reopened in 1956. Named for Seymour Johnson, naval aviator and Goldsboro native. — Map (db m65448) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F 11 — Sherman's March
Sherman's Army, on its march from Savannah, entered Goldsboro, its chief North Carolina objective, Mar. 21, 1865. — Map (db m31556) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — Union Assault on the Bridge — Battle of Goldsborough Bridge
Union General John G. Foster’s prime objective, the wooden covered Wilmington & Weldon railroad bridge, crossed the Neuse River here. After the 51st and 52nd North Carolina regiments were pushed back by the Union advance coming through the fields on . . . — Map (db m28569) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — Wayne County Veterans Memorial
We must honor those sons of ours who fought so bravely. A Grateful Citizen (1925) (Walkway plaque) Most of them were boys when they died and they gave up two lives--the one they were living and the one they would have lived when . . . — Map (db m66520) WM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F-9 — Waynesborough
First seat of Wayne County, incorporated 1787. The town died after the county seat was moved to Goldsboro in 1850. Site is here. — Map (db m60357) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Goldsboro — F 24 — Wm. T. Dortch
Confederate Senator, Speaker State House of Representatives, head of commission to codify State laws, 1883. Home is 1, grave 6, blocks S. — Map (db m31553) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Mount Olive — Mount OliveGarrard's Raid — Foster's Raid
(preface) Late in 1862, Union Gen. John G. Foster’s garrison was well entrenched in New Bern and made several incursions into the countryside. On December 11, Foster led a raid from New Bern to burn the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Bridge . . . — Map (db m77311) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Mount Olive — F-43 — Mount Olive College
Original Free Will Baptist. Chartered in 1951 as junior college. Moved here, 1953. Senior college charter granted in 1982. — Map (db m28596) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), near Fremont — F-1 — Charles B. Aycock
Governor, 1901-1905. Crusader for public education. Birthplace stands 2/3 mi. east. — Map (db m65546) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Seven Springs — F 44 — Battle of Whitehall
On December 15-16, 1862, on a raid at Whitehall, Union troops led by Gen. J.G. Foster damaged the Confederate Ram "Neuse." — Map (db m30539) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Seven Springs — Engagement at WhitehallA Sharp Action — Foster's Raid
(Preface): Late in 1862, Union Gen. John G. Foster's garrison was well entrenched in New Bern and made several incursions into the countryside. On December 11, Foster led a raid from New Bern to burn the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Bridge . . . — Map (db m30540) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Seven Springs — The Battle of WhitehallThe War Between the States — December 15-16, 1862
On this site, Confederate and Union troops engaged in battle. Confederates took position N. side of river, after burning bridge. Union troops occupied S. side and hill above, destroying much of village. CSS Neuse damaged during shelling. After . . . — Map (db m30542) HM
North Carolina (Wayne County), Walnut Creek — Dobbs County Court House
Three miles south of this spot on Walnut Creek is a marker indicating the exact site of Dobbs County Court House 1756-1791. — Map (db m31549) HM

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