Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Related Historical Markers

Fort Mose Historic State Park
 
African Origins Marker (<i>center detail view</i>) image, Touch for more information
By Cosmos Mariner, December 10, 2014
African Origins Marker (center detail view)
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — African OriginsFort Mose Historic State Park
Fort Mose (Moh-Say) was a multicultural community of people originally from West and Central Africa, along with some Native Americans. Some of the residents of Mose, like Francisco Menéndez, fought in the 1715 Yamasee War against the . . . — Map (db m126973) HM
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — Bloody MoseFort Mose Historic State Park
In 1740, the English attacked St. Augustine, but departed after a bloody battle at Fort Mose. Georgia Governor James Oglethorpe invaded Florida with a sizable force, including Lower Creeks and Uchise Indian allies. Fort Mose inhabitants . . . — Map (db m126968) HM
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — British EnslavementFort Mose Historic State Park
Once in English Carolina, the enslaved Africans were forced into labor and had no legal standing and few rights. Africans labored on indigo plantations, and as lumbermen and cattlemen. They produced materials for shipbuilding and cleared . . . — Map (db m126965) HM
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — El Pueblo de Gracia Real de Santa Teresa de MoseFort Mose Historic State Park
Great Seal of the State of Florida:"In God We Trust" On the shore of Robinson Creek, ¼ mile east of this marker, was the site of a Spanish mission for Indians left homeless during Queen Anne's War. Since 1688, Negro slaves . . . — Map (db m126969) HM WM
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — Escape & FlightFort Mose Historic State Park
In 1693, Spain’s King Charles II proclaimed that any English slave who reached Spanish Florida would be granted freedom upon converting to Catholicism. By sea and land, Africans fled to St. Augustine on a dangerous journey with a strong . . . — Map (db m126966) HM
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — EvacuationFort Mose Historic State Park
Spain ceded Florida to England in 1763, and Mose residents departed with other colonists for Cuba. During Fort Mose's final years, life on the frontier grew more difficult. Constant attacks by English and Indian raiding parties drove Mose . . . — Map (db m126971) HM
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — Fort MoseFort Mose Historic State Park
All that remains of Fort Mose is underground - on the island before you, and in the surrounding salt marsh. Working together, archaeologists and historians have pieced together the story of Fort Mose using historic documents, maps, aerial . . . — Map (db m126972) HM
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — Fort Mose IFort Mose Historic State Park
In 1738, after more than 100 runaways arrived from Carolina, the Spanish governor established Fort Mose. As Africans continued to flee Carolina, frontier skirmishes between the English, Spanish, and their Native American allies threatened . . . — Map (db m126967) HM
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — Fort Mose IIFort Mose Historic State Park
Twelve years after the Bloody Mose battle, Mose residents returned to the frontier and constructed a second fort and community. Mose's fort, houses, and surrounding fields were destroyed during the siege of St. Augustine. From 1740-1752, . . . — Map (db m126970) HM
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — Middle PassageFort Mose Historic State Park
During the 18th century, thousands of enslaved Africans faced starvation, torture, and even death on their journey to the Americas, a voyage known as the middle passage. What was the Middle Passage? The Middle Leg of a 3-part Voyage: . . . — Map (db m126964) HM

12 markers matched your search criteria.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.