Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
167 entries match your criteria. The first 100 are listed. The final 67 ⊳
 
 

Historical Markers and War Memorials in Cecil County, Maryland

 
Clickable Map of Cecil County, Maryland and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Cecil County, MD (167) Harford County, MD (153) Kent County, MD (86) New Castle County, DE (426) Chester County, PA (236) Lancaster County, PA (345)  CecilCounty(167) Cecil County (167)  HarfordCounty(153) Harford County (153)  KentCounty(86) Kent County (86)  NewCastleCountyDelaware(426) New Castle County (426)  ChesterCountyPennsylvania(236) Chester County (236)  LancasterCounty(345) Lancaster County (345)
Adjacent to Cecil County, Maryland
    Harford County (153)
    Kent County (86)
    New Castle County, Delaware (426)
    Chester County, Pennsylvania (236)
    Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (345)
 
Touch name on list to highlight map location.
Touch blue arrow, or on map, to go there.
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Maryland (Cecil County), Calvert — Brick Meeting House
William Penn set aside lot no. 30 (500 acres) of the “Nottingham Lots” in 1702 for a “common” and site of a “meeting house” as a bold move in the boundary line dispute with Lord Baltimore. It has been continuously . . . — Map (db m147740) HM
2Maryland (Cecil County), Calvert — Calvert Village
40-acre grant from William Penn in 1701 on which present East Nottingham Friends Meeting House built, 1724, with stone addition completed in 1752. Used as American army hospital in 1778. Cross Keys Tavern, built in 1744, was mid-way on Old . . . — Map (db m145437) HM
3Maryland (Cecil County), Cecilton — Founded on FriendshipChesapeake Country National Scenic Byway
The town of Cecilton owes its existence to Augustine Herman, a 1633 immigrant to America. A wealthy merchant, diplomat, cartographer, and explorer, he also proposed the creation of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal a century before it was . . . — Map (db m155453) HM
4Maryland (Cecil County), Cecilton — Greenfield
Georgian Manor House, built in the mid 1700’s on a 750 acre tract patented to John and Mary Ward in 1674, is noted for its architectural purity, fine paneling and woodwork. The Ward burying ground nearby also contains graves of Lusbys and Pascaults, . . . — Map (db m1569) HM
5Maryland (Cecil County), Charlestown — Capt. Michael Rudulph
During Revolutionary War this daring officer commanded Cecil County troop of Lee’s Legion, the Calvary of Lieutenant Colonel Henry (Lighthorse Harry)Lee. Near here in 1778 Rudulph is said to have led squad disguised as poultry peddlers who boarded . . . — Map (db m144294) HM
6Maryland (Cecil County), Charlestown — Charlestown
Laid out and erected as a town by Act of Assembly in 1742 “there being as yet no such place settled at, or near the head of Chesapeake Bay". George Washington records many visits to Charlestown in his diary. He lodged here Aug. 10, . . . — Map (db m144413) HM
7Maryland (Cecil County), Charlestown — Lt. Col. Nathaniel Ramsay
Member of Council of Safety and courageous officer of the Maryland Line in Revolutionary War, native of Pennsylvania, Princeton graduate (1767) and lawyer. He settled in brick house near this site after his marriage in 1771 to Margaret Jane Peale. . . . — Map (db m144223) HM
8Maryland (Cecil County), Charlestown — Shrewd DecisionStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Hard Pressed Militiamen were often assigned elsewhere, leaving hometown defense to those exempted from service due to age or infirmity. Outnumbered, and with limited artillery and ammunition, even the bravest defenders rarely rebuffed an . . . — Map (db m79526) HM
9Maryland (Cecil County), Charlestown — Site of Charlestown Wharf
Stone wharf and warehouse were built here by Decree of General Assembly in 1744. Remains of wharf can be seen. Officers' chests left behind by two Companies of Royal American Regiment quartered in winter of 1756-1757 were auctioned by town . . . — Map (db m144287) HM
10Maryland (Cecil County), Charlestown — Susquehanna Manor(New Connaught Manor)
32,000 acres granted to George Talbot with Right of Court Baron and Court Leet June 11, 1680 — Map (db m144293) HM
11Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — “Bohemia Mannor”
Granted 1662 as 4000 acres in the “farr remote, then unknown wilderness” to Augustine Herman, native of Bohemia, for “making a mapp of this province” regranted 1663 as 6000 acres erected a manor in 1676. Not open . . . — Map (db m144305) HM
12Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — “Labadie Tract”Comprising 3750 Acres
Obtained in 1684 from Augustine Herman by the religious sect called Labadists. Here they led an austere form of communistic life but disintegrated about 1698. — Map (db m1566) HM
13Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — A Historic Hub of Commerce
Formerly known as the “Village of Bohemia,” Chesapeake City owes its existence to the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. From the time work began on the canal in 1824, the village became a hub of activity and a thriving port, creating . . . — Map (db m145256) HM
14Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — Beck's Landing
Named after Mayor Cliff Beck (1996-2000) Funding has been provided by the Department of Natural Resources - Program Open Space Chesapeake City Ferry Service November 1942 - September 1949 Life in the town of Chesapeake City was . . . — Map (db m145338) HM
15Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — B104 — Brady-Rees HouseC. 1870
This house is the best representation of a Victorian Gothic style home in town. It is 5 bays wide with a beautifully etched transom light adorning the front entrance. Henry Brady owned the mule teams that pulled the barges through the canal. Being . . . — Map (db m33589) HM
16Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — C & D Canal
Built 1824–1829 this former 13–5/8 mile long lock canal connected the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays, nearby Chesapeake City was the canal’s western terminus and steadily grew in the mid to late 19th century serving canal traffic. — Map (db m1563) HM
17Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — C&D Canal Museum
(Side one) This is the liftwheel pumping plant of the original Chesapeake & Delaware canal. From 1837 to 1927 its engines provided water for navigation between Chesapeake City, Maryland and Delaware City, Delaware. The canal was purchased in . . . — Map (db m145166) HM
18Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — B206 — Capt. Colmary-Salmon HouseC. 1848
This home is architecturally important as it is one of two mid 19th century dwellings with Greek Revival overtones. These buildings being two rooms deep were pace setters for other buildings in town. Captain Abraham Colmary built this house in 1848 . . . — Map (db m33578) HM
19Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Tablet
This tablet is erected by the proprietors of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, to commemorate its completion on the 17th of October, 1829; and to stand as a testimonial of their gratitude to James C. Fisher, President, and Thomas P. Cope, John K. . . . — Map (db m145167) HM
20Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — B19 — Cropper HouseC. 1833
Over the years this building has served many purposes. Originally the building was the home of captain Kendall Cropper in 1833 who, along with his three brothers, were instrumental in founding the town. Dr. Thomas Conrey was another early owner . . . — Map (db m144511) HM
21Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — B204 — Dr. Smithers' House c. 1848
Built by Firman Layman, this house is a prime example of original details from the late 1840's when the Greek Revival architecture was in vogue. Waitman Smithers, the toll collector and later superintendent of the C&D Canal, purchased the house in . . . — Map (db m144506) HM
22Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — B98 — Franklin HallC. 1870
In Revolutionary times this site was occupied by the very popular Chick's Tavern, one of 2 buildings in Bohemia Village. In the 1800's the property was obtained by Thomas Conrey who constructed this Romanesque style building c. 1870 using locally . . . — Map (db m144507) HM
23Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — From Creek to Canal
Would you believe that the impressive stretch of water before you was once a creek? As early as the 17th century, settlers to the New World realized that the nation’s growth would depend upon transportation of goods by land and water. . . . — Map (db m144763) HM
24Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — C220 — Gassaway HouseC. 1860
The original lease for this property dated October 4, 1856 given to Henry Robinson. Robert & Evelyn Gassaway resided in and owned the property in the 1970's. Mr. Gassaway became the first African American mayor elected to that office by 80 percent . . . — Map (db m145169) HM
25Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — G406 — Jennie Whiteoak HouseC. 1864
This home is recognized for having the "Dunnage" or scrap wood that was removed from passing ships and used as siding. Also called the Reeves House as Pop Reeve's lived here from 1951 to 1985. A complete restoration in the early 1990's brought this . . . — Map (db m145126) HM
26Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — B224 — Karsner-Wilsey House/OfficeC. 1884
Like it's neighbors this house is 3 story, 3 bay frame dwelling with a rear wing. Standing on a stone foundation, it is covered with weather-boards. Dr. William C. Karsner built this home c. 1884. He served the people of Chesapeake City and the . . . — Map (db m33574) HM
27Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — G111 — Kinter-Metz House1854
Thomas Conrey probably had this house built around 1854 with lumber from his mill. In 1876 it came into the possession of Jacob Metz and his wife, Sarah. Mr. Metz was a blacksmith with a business on the corner of Front Street and William Street. . . . — Map (db m33563) HM
28Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — Long Bridge
A section of this fence was originally a railing on both sides of the "Long Bridge". this steel bridge, pictured here in 1906 was a center-pivot span, operated manually with a large crank. It connected City Dock (now Pell Gardens) to the Causeway . . . — Map (db m145168) HM
29Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — G400 — McReynolds-Woods HouseC. 1870
This home was occupied by several notable people over the years. The bridge tender for the long bridge, Mr. Hevelow, used the railing from the bridge to fence in the yard. Capt. Ed Sheridan operated the ferry which would transverse the canal, until . . . — Map (db m145125) HM
30Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — B109 — National Bank of Chesapeake CityC. 1903
The National Bank of Chesapeake City was built in 1903 by the John Banks family. The exterior is Port Deposit granite and the interior still houses the original bank vault and tin ceilings. This massive granite building is two bays wide and three . . . — Map (db m144825) HM
31Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — Pell Gardens1982
Pell Gardens was dedicated in October of 1982 to honor Dr. Walden Pell who with his wife Edith were instrumental in the early restoration of town buildings and establishing the Civic Association, both in the 1970s. Dr. Pell was headmaster of St. . . . — Map (db m33592) HM
32Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — B208 — Sarah Beaston HouseC. 1848
Sarah Beaston was a prominent business person in Chesapeake city (Bohemia Village) in the early 1800's. she had this house built circa 1848 as her retirement home. Previously, she owned and operated the Bayard House, having sold it to Richard Bayard . . . — Map (db m33576) HM
33Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — G221 — Savin-Conrey House 1848
This building has been greatly altered since it was constructed. It maintains the continuity of the closely-built dwellings along George Street. This is another of the houses built by Thomas Conrey using the products of his mill on the causeway. In . . . — Map (db m145127) HM
34Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — F401 — Shipwatch InnC. 1930
This waterfront property was originally built as a private residence in 1920 for Captain Firman Layman, proprietor of the Bayard House Restaurant. The property housed a stable, barber shop and apartments until 1996 when it was renovated and restored . . . — Map (db m33561) HM
35Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — St. Augustine School
Still visible close by is the 20-foot square pre-1850 stone foundation for an historic school house. Rebuilt in 1880 at a cost of $488, this one room school was typical of those found in rural 19th century Cecil County. The Maryland State Teachers . . . — Map (db m9663) HM
36Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — St. Augustine’s Church
First called “Mannour Chappel” a chapel of ease of North Sassafras Parish. Established in Bohemia Manor in compliance with an act of the Maryland Assembly, 1692. Erected as a separate parish in 1744. — Map (db m1565) HM
37Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — G301 — Steele-Davis HouseC. 1872
This Federal-Italianate home was originally a two story school house and Odd Fellows lodge. In 1872, the three story front section was built by Joseph Hedrick, the official of the C&D Canal. In 1879, Mr. Hedrick was caught using canal funds to . . . — Map (db m145123) HM
38Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — G327 — Stubbs-Caldwell HouseC. 1874
Built by Richard B. Stubbs, this is one of the few buildings which have gables attached to the facade, giving it a Victorian Gothic element. The one story angled porch follows the configuration of the facade and bay window, creating a semi-octagonal . . . — Map (db m145124) HM
39Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — B11 — The Bayard Housec. 1780
The building is considered to be the oldest building in Chesapeake City. Charles and Sarah Beaston purchased Bayard House in 1809 and opened as a tavern and inn in 1829. The tavern was run by Firman Layman until his death in 1881. In 1911, it was . . . — Map (db m144510) HM
40Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — B224 — The Whiteoak HouseC. 1840
Architecturally the Whiteoak House is representative of vernacular buildings constructed in Chesapeake City in the 1840's and 50's. Old timers in Chesapeake City claim this house rests on the 1st lot sold in town. In 1854, Richard Bayard leased the . . . — Map (db m144831) HM
41Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — B108 — Town HallC. 1914
Ralph Rees built this commercial building to house his hardware store around 1914. Like many early twentieth century commercial front buildings, only the pressed tin facade raises two stories. This building housed Rees hardware store and an agency . . . — Map (db m33588) HM
42Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — World War I Monument
This tablet is dedicated by the people of Chesapeake City and the Second Election District of Cecil County, Maryland, to those of their number who offered their lives in defense of humanity in the Great War of Nations 1914 - 1918 Roll of Honor . . . — Map (db m144823) HM
43Maryland (Cecil County), Chesapeake City — World War II Monument
In grateful tribute to the men and women of the Second district who served in World War II Glory to them that died in this great cause Basalyga, Walter • Bailey, Harry • Cahall, William K. • Fithian, Albert • Gilbert, Robert • Heverin, Willard P. . . . — Map (db m145122) HM
44Maryland (Cecil County), Colora — This Tablet is in Commemoration
This Tablet is in Commemoration of Richard Stockton and Dr. Benjamin Rush signers of the Declaration of Independence and students of West Nottingham Academy. Stockton from 1743 to 1748 - Rush from 1751 to 1756. — Map (db m145627) HM
45Maryland (Cecil County), Colora — West Nottingham Academy
Founded 1744 by by Samuel Finley, Presbyterian Minister and a native of County Armagh, Ireland. He remained in charge of the academy and church until 1761 when he was chosen President of the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University. — Map (db m145626) HM
46Maryland (Cecil County), Conowingo — A Susquehannock Indian Fort
A Susquehannock Indian fort located at this point was an important factor in the boundary line controversy between Lord Baltimore and William Penn in 1683. — Map (db m145866) HM
47Maryland (Cecil County), Conowingo — Bald Friar Ford & Ferry
Near Pilot, two and one-half miles northwest of this point, lies the site of a Susquehanna fording used by Indians before the coming of the white man. By 1695, a barge provided ferry service to the colonists. The Conowingo Lake now covers the . . . — Map (db m127912) HM
48Maryland (Cecil County), Conowingo — St. Patrick's Chapel
Built in 1819 by Irish immigrants, who lived along the Susquehanna River, dug the canals, and piloted the canal barges. It is the second oldest Catholic Church in Cecil County. Since Catholics were not allowed, at that time, to build churches . . . — Map (db m129305) HM
49Maryland (Cecil County), Conowingo — The Proprietors of the Susquehanna Canal
The corporate title of the company authorized in 1783 to build one of the first inland waterways in America. The bed of this canal and some of its stone locks are still visible near this road. — Map (db m146175) HM
50Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — BohemiaFormerly Milligan Hall
Home of George Milligan (1720–1783), Scotch trader. Purchased from his son, Robert, by Louis McLane (1784–1857) who represented Delaware in the United States House and Senate, was Minister to Great Britain, Secretary of the Treasury, . . . — Map (db m144538) HM
51Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Cherry Grove
Ancestral home of the De Veazie (Veazey) family; patented to John Veazey ca. 1670. His descendant, Colonel Thomas Ward Veazey, defended Duffy’s Fort, Fredericktown, from the British fleet May 5, 1813, and served as Governor of Maryland, . . . — Map (db m156563) HM
52Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Essex Lodge
Granted to Samuel Brocus, whose daughter Susannah married, circa 1700, Edward Veazey. Their son, Colonel John Veazey, Sr., was Chief Military Officer of Cecil County and Justice and Judge for 22 years. His eldest son, Edward, was High Sheriff of . . . — Map (db m155766) HM
53Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Hazelmore
Land originally granted to Phillip Calvert, Chancellor of Maryland, and wife, Anne, in 1658. Richard Low, gentleman of Virginia, purchased tract known as "Hazelmore" and adjacent land "The Grove" in 1665. Bought by Abraham Wild, trader and mariner . . . — Map (db m144250) HM
54Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Hilltop ViewStar Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Mount Harmon offered a vantage point for events unfolding along the Sassafras May 6, 1813. Barges of British marines passed by en route to Georgetown and Fredericktown. As they returned, smoke rose in the skies behind them from the burning of . . . — Map (db m156570) HM
55Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — History QuestMount Harmon Plantation
The Sassafras River, stretching before you, provides a window into four centuries of history at Mount Harmon. Any number of historic events occurred within view of this spot. European Exploration & Settlement Captain John Smith, the first . . . — Map (db m156917) HM
56Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Mount Harmon PlantationTobacco Prize House and Wharf
Originally owned by Godfrey Harmon, then by James Paul Heath; subsequent to 1760 the home of James Louttit, Sr. and Jr., and Sidney George, Jr., Patriots. Vestrymen of St. Stephen’s Church, and contributors, 1782, to the original endowment of . . . — Map (db m144248) HM
57Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Mount Harmon Plantation at World’s EndHistoric Tidewater Plantation & Nature Preserve
Welcome to Mount Harmon Plantation, one of Maryland’s premier historic sites. Comprising 200-acres of pristine open space, Mount Harmon features a restored 18th century manor house and plantation kitchen, a formal boxwood garden, a rare tobacco . . . — Map (db m156564) HM
58Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Mount Harmon Plantation at World's End
Mount Harmon Plantation at World's End. A National Trust Historic House. The gift of Mrs. Harry Clark Boden IV in memory of James Louttit Sr. and his wife, Mary George who acquired the property in 1760 — Map (db m156566) HM
59Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Mount Harmon Plantation at World's EndHistoric Tidewater Plantation & Nature Preserve
Welcome to Mount Harmon Plantation, one of Maryland's premier historic sites. Comprising 200-acres of pristine open space, Mount Harmon features a restored 18th century manor house and plantation kitchen, a formal boxwood garden, a rare tobacco . . . — Map (db m156881) HM
60Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Mount Pleasant
Built by Dr. John Thompson Veasey, 1825, “of Mount Harmon” as he was known, who, with Colonel Thomas Ward Veasey assisted in the defense of Duffy’s Fort, 1813. He was a greatnephew of George Ross, signer of the Declaration of . . . — Map (db m144246) HM
61Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — North Sassafras Parish(Episcopal)
Established by Act of Assembly in 1692. The first vestry met January 10, 1693 in the Court House at Ordinary Point. The Parish Church was “dedicated to the honor of Saint Stephen”, March 25, 1706. Rebuilt 1737, 1823 and 1873. — Map (db m1701) HM
62Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — On the Wild Side[Mount Harmon Plantation]
As you continue along the Pond Trail, keep a look out for deer, eagles, great blue herons, owls, ducks, geese, foxes, beaver and osprey. The fields, wooded areas, ponds and marshes at Mount Harmon attract an array of wildlife. The Chesapeake Bay . . . — Map (db m156569)
63Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Original Vestry House Memorial
[left plaque] This memorial preserves the site of the original vestry house 1731-1737 [center plaque] This columnbarium given to the glory of God and in loving memory of Delphine S. and Michael Luyn 2002 . . . — Map (db m155805) HM
64Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Plantation Life in the Colonial EraMount Harmon Plantation
Plantation Life In the colonial era Mount Harmon was a working plantation. A community of people lived at Mount Harmon during the 18th century including the landowners, indentured servants, slaves, and tradespeople. Inventories from the Heath . . . — Map (db m156567) HM
65Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Rose Hill
Home of General Thomas Marsh Forman (1758–1845), Aide to General William Alexander, known as Lord Stirling, and a representative in the General Assembly, 1790 and 1800. He served with Major George Armistead, Fort McHenry, 1814. A later owner, . . . — Map (db m144249) HM
66Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — St. Francis Xavier Church“Old Bohemia” — 2 Miles → —
Founded 1704 by Rev. Thomas Mansell, S.J., one of the earliest permanent Catholic establishments in the English Colonies. Bohemia Academy Founded 1745 by Rev. Thomas Pulton, S.J. attended by Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signed of the . . . — Map (db m1572) HM
67Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — St. Peters Episcopal Church BellFrom Cecilton Chapel Belfry
This Bell hung in the Cecilton Chapel belfry for many years. During the winter months it was rung each Sunday morning at service time. When the warm weather returned, services resumed here. With the demolition of the Chapel, the bell was stored . . . — Map (db m155480) HM
68Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — The Anchorage
Home of the Lusbys in the early 1700’s. Ruth Lusby and Commodore Jacob Jones married in 1821, made the Anchorage their home and enlarged it in 1835. Jones served on the “Philadelphia” when it ran aground at Tripoli and commanded the . . . — Map (db m145440) HM
69Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — The Sassafras RiverGateway to the Chesapeake Bay
About the Sassafras River The Sassafras River is a popular destination for recreation, boating, fishing and waterfowl. The Sassafras River is over 20 miles long and provides critical habitat wildlife and is an important flyway for migrating . . . — Map (db m156879) HM
70Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Tobacco and Mount Harmon
Colonial Tobacco Trade Before you stands a crop of tobacco planted to reflect the historic tobacco trade that flourished at Mount Harmon in the colonial era. Tobacco was an important cash crop that helped build early American settlements, and . . . — Map (db m156568) HM
71Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — WoodlawnFormerly "Neighbour’s Grudge"
The 305 acre farm of William Ward. He gave a tract called “North Levell” on which stands St. Stephen’s Church. His descendant, Henry Veazey Ward, was Consul General for the Republic of Chile. Another, Juliana Veazey Ward, married Dr. . . . — Map (db m144247) HM
72Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — "O! say can you see..."Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
The Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail traces the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake. Along the trail you'll encounter tangible evidence of the war and stories that bring the people and events to life. Discover the far-reaching impacts of . . . — Map (db m154170) HM
73Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — “New Munster”
A tract of 6,000 acres laid out in 1683 by George Talbot (then surveyor-general of Maryland) for Edwin O’Dwire and 15 other Irishmen. Its northern boundary extended into what is now the State of Pennsylvania. — Map (db m1763) HM
74Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — “Partridge Hill”Built c. 1760
Home of Henry Hollingsworth, merchant, legislator and colonel of Elk Battalion of Militia in Revolutionary Way as Commissary for the Eastern Shore. He obtained supplies for the Americans and French allies embarking near here in 1781 on voyage down . . . — Map (db m154171) HM
75Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Big Elk Chapel
Big Elk Methodist Episcopal Church, known as the Big Elk Chapel, is located at Flounders Corner on a parcel of land originally part of the New Munster Tract. In 1877 the Rev. John France of Cherry Hill Methodist Episcopal Church held a great . . . — Map (db m146992) HM
76Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Blue Ball Tavern
Established about 1710 on Lot No. 35 of “The Nottingham Lots” by Andrew Job who secured it from William Penn. Job’s son, Thomas married Elizabeth Maxwell, niece of Daniel Defoe who wrote “Robinson Crusoe.” — Map (db m146176) HM
77Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Carriage Steps
Take a step back in time and image yourself arriving by horse and carriage after an 8 to 12 hour ride from Baltimore or Philadelphia. You would step off the carriage and walk up these steps to perhaps attend a grand gala or simply enjoy the . . . — Map (db m152164) HM
78Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Cecil County Doughboy Monument
This monument is erected by the people of Cecil County in grateful recognition of the services of the men and women of this county who, on land or at sea, served their country in the Great World War - 1914 - 1918 - and in especial remembrance of the . . . — Map (db m144721) WM
79Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Creswell Hall
The home of John A. J. Creswell who nominated James Buchanan for President in 1856 and turned Republican in 1861. He was successively Assistant-Adjutant General of Maryland, member of the House of Representatives, Senator and Postmaster by . . . — Map (db m145436) HM
80Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — ElktonOriginally called “Head of Elk”
Lafayette embarked his troops March 8, 1781 to capture Benedict Arnold. Returned April 9, began overland march to Virginia April 12, 1781. Washington and Rochambeau with their combined forces stopped Sept. 6-7, 1781 on way to . . . — Map (db m154172) HM
81Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Elkton, Wedding Capital of the East
In the early 20th century, Maryland had no waiting period for issuing marriage licenses, and couples from throughout the Northeast flocked to Elkton—the first county seat south of the State line—where they could be married without delay. . . . — Map (db m154173) HM
82Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Fighting BackStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
British raiders traveled along rivers to Upper Bay towns in 1813. Elkton, at the head of Elk River, expected to be a target, because it could be a landing site for an advance on Philadelphia. Citizens of Elkton built three earthen forts and . . . — Map (db m154174) HM
83Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Flight 214
In memory of the 81 men women and children who lost their lives when Pan Am Flight 214 crashed on this site December 8, 1963 — Map (db m147678) HM
84Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Frenchtown
Frenchtown, one mile west of this marker, was an important link in the north-south travel route during the 18th and 19th centuries. As a depot, it was burned by the British under Admiral Cockburn on April 29, 1813. — Map (db m1526) HM
85Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Henry Deibert and E. Deibert Bros. Barge BuildingElk Landing 1889 to 1911
Workers outfitting anchor chain on the barge “Arundel”. She was 215 ft. long, 30 ft. wide and 25 ft. deep. Notice the large expanse of marshland across the Elk Creek in the area of Fort Defiance. An estimated 200 “Schooner . . . — Map (db m145462) HM
86Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Hollingsworth House
About 1750 Zebulon Hollingsworth built the approximately 30 x 30 foot left hand section as a brick two story dwelling. In the mid-1800s it was gutted by fire and rebuilt as three stories with a low pitched roof. Also the two story right hand side . . . — Map (db m152141) HM
87Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Hollingsworth House
You are standing in front of the structure known as the Hollingsworth House. The original home was built in the late 1700s by Zebulon Hollingsworth, Jr. as a two-story brick structure. After a fire in 1848, the house was rebuilt as it . . . — Map (db m152226) HM
88Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Holly Hall
Built c. 1810–1820 by James Sewall. He was Clerk of Cecil County Court 1805–1841; Brigade Major of Maryland Militia and a Commander at nearby Fort Defiance in War of 1812; one of founders of Trinity Episcopal Church, Elkton in 1832. — Map (db m145435) HM
89Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Maryland Bicentennial Tree
It has stood its ground, survived the American Revolution and continues to serve an appreciative nation July 1978 Maryland Bicentennial Commission --- Maryland Forest Service — Map (db m162165) HM
90Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Michael Rudulph
Michael Rudulph-Bold and Reckless, Hero of Rev. War-Born near here at Belle Hill, Jan. 5, 1758, lost at sea July 1793. — Map (db m137133) WM
91Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Mitchell House
Built in 1769 as the home of Dr. Abraham Mitchell, noted physician. During the Revolutionary War he converted the house into a hospital for the use of wounded soldiers of the Continental Army. General Lafayette was a friend of the Mitchell family . . . — Map (db m154175) HM
92Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Native Americans in the 1600's
• They hunted, foraged, and fished in this area. • Pottery and projectile points have been found during archaeological excavations. — Map (db m152161) HM
93Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — New Castle and Frenchtown Railroad1832–1853
One of the earliest in the United States, the line ran from New Castle on the Delaware River, crossed the highway here, and extended to Frenchtown on the Elk River 1½ miles west of this point. — Map (db m1564) HM
94Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Old Post RoadEstablished 1666
Where it crosses the Mason and Dixon Line, dividing the States of Maryland and Delaware. Run 1763–1767 — Map (db m145430) HM
95Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Revolutionary War
During the Revolutionary War (1775-1783), both American and British troops passed through Elk Landing. The American troops were led by General George Washington, and the British Troops were led by General William Howe. You may be on the . . . — Map (db m152162) HM
96Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Rock Presbyterian Church
Founded 1720 in North Milford Hundred, Cecil County, Maryland. First called New Erection on the Branches of Elk River, then Elk River Church, Great Elk, upper Elk and, since 1793, Rock. Present church erected 1761 remodeled in 1844 and 1900. — Map (db m1764) HM
97Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Site of Fort Defiance
About one eighth mile south east on Elk River. American forces here and at Fort Hollingsworth (Elk Landing) repulsed the British under Admiral Cockburn in their attempt to capture Elkton, April 29, 1813. — Map (db m152198) HM
98Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Site of Fort Hollingsworth
About three tenths mile south at Elk Landing, American forces here and at Fort Defiance, about one mile below on Elk River, repulsed the British under Admiral Cockburn in their attempt to capture Elkton, April 29, 1813. — Map (db m2228) HM
99Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Spirited RebuffStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
The British took their terror campaign to the Elk River in April 1813. Their target—Elkton—was protected by several forts. After capturing a gun battery at Frenchtown, British raiders destroyed its storehouses, a fishery, and . . . — Map (db m146172) HM
100Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Stone House
This is the location of the Jon Steelman Trading Post, which fell into disrepair and was replaced with the building you see now, It was originally used to trade goods with the Native Americans. In later years this site was owned and operated . . . — Map (db m152165) HM

167 entries matched your criteria. The first 100 are listed above. The final 67 ⊳
 
Paid Advertisement
Feb. 26, 2021