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Historical Markers and War Memorials in Washington County, Maryland

 
Clickable Map of Washington County, Maryland and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Washington County, MD (848) Allegany County, MD (266) Frederick County, MD (527) Franklin County, PA (207) Fulton County, PA (46) Loudoun County, VA (308) Berkeley County, WV (103) Jefferson County, WV (347) Morgan County, WV (104)  WashingtonCounty(848) Washington County (848)  AlleganyCounty(266) Allegany County (266)  FrederickCounty(527) Frederick County (527)  FranklinCountyPennsylvania(207) Franklin County (207)  FultonCounty(46) Fulton County (46)  LoudounCountyVirginia(308) Loudoun County (308)  BerkeleyCountyWest Virginia(103) Berkeley County (103)  JeffersonCounty(347) Jefferson County (347)  MorganCounty(104) Morgan County (104)
Hagerstown is the county seat for Washington County
Adjacent to Washington County, Maryland
      Allegany County (266)  
      Frederick County (527)  
      Franklin County, Pennsylvania (207)  
      Fulton County, Pennsylvania (46)  
      Loudoun County, Virginia (308)  
      Berkeley County, West Virginia (103)  
      Jefferson County, West Virginia (347)  
      Morgan County, West Virginia (104)  
 
Touch name on this list to highlight map location.
Touch blue arrow, or on map, to go there.
1Maryland (Washington County), Antietam — An Indian Deed
Israel Friend in 1727 secured a deed from the Indian chiefs of the Five Nations. Beginning “at the mouth of Andietum Creek thence up the Potomack River 200 shoots as fur as an arrow can be slung out of a bow” thence “100 shoots . . . Map (db m1972) HM
2Maryland (Washington County), Antietam — Antietam Iron Works Bridge
This four-arch stone bridge spanning the Antietam Creek was built in 1832 by John Weaver. It is located at the site of a large ironworks complex, first known as the Frederick Forge and later as the Antietam Iron Works which operated intermittently . . . Map (db m3206) HM
3Maryland (Washington County), Beaver Creek — Christian Newcomer Home
Christian Newcomer, 1749-1830, was one of the founders of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ, the first American-born denomination. He moved to Washington County in 1775 and in his journal described crossing the Allegany Mountains 38 times . . . Map (db m129125) HM
4Maryland (Washington County), Benevola — Roxbury Mills Bridge
This bridge was built in 1824, in close proximity to Roxbury Mills, an early sawmill and later a large distillery complex which operated into the 20th century. A three-arch bridge over the Antietam, it was one of a series of bridges built for the . . . Map (db m5036) HM
5Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — "Old Fort Frederick"
During the American War for Independence Fort Frederick was revitalized for military purposes. The Continental Congress turned the fort into a prison camp to house captured British soldiers. As a result the fort became extremely overcrowded, and . . . Map (db m96137) HM
6Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — “...a place of Arms...would be absolutely neccessary”
Throughout the 18th Century, the major colonial powers of France and Great Britain were vying for control of North America. By the 1750's the British extended their settlements westward over the Appalachian Mountains and the French moved south out . . . Map (db m166798) HM
7Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — “...to protect, preserve...and provide access thereto for the public.”
During the American War for Independence Fort Frederick was revitalized for military purposes. The Continental Congress turned the fort into a prison camp to house captured British soldiers. As a result the fort became extremely overcrowded, and . . . Map (db m96138) HM
8Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Big Pool JunctionWestern Maryland Rail Trail
The eighteen miles of rails between Hagerstown and Big Pool were the busiest of the Western Maryland Railway. It was here in 1892 that a connection was made with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad across the Potomac River at Cherry Run, West . . . Map (db m735) HM
9Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Fort FrederickMaryland State Park
Colonial stone fort built 1756 for Province of Maryland by Gov. Horatio Sharpe to protect frontier against French and Indians after Braddock’s defeat. Detention camp for British prisoners 1776–83. Occupied 1861–2 by Union troops. George Washington . . . Map (db m681) HM
10Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Fort FrederickA Witness to War
Built by the Maryland colony in 1756 during the French and Indian War, Fort Frederick’s stone walls surrounded three large buildings. The colonists abandoned the frontier fort in 1759, when the threat of Indian raids subsided. During the . . . Map (db m821) HM
11Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Fort Frederick
. . . Map (db m103762) HM
12Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Fort Frederick Officers’ Quarters
A Ghost in the Ground. Before you is the foundation of “The Governor’s House,” the building that served as the officers’ quarters, ceremonial hall and storeroom for Fort Frederick. What did that building look like? We know the size and general . . . Map (db m823) HM
13Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Four LocksChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Here the Potomac River makes a meandering four-mile loop around Prather’s Neck. To avoid the bend in the river, the canal engineers cut the canal one-half mile across the neck. Because of the rapid elevation change, these four locks were . . . Map (db m15285) HM
14Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . Map (db m32675) HM
15Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Mule PowerChesapeake and Ohio National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
“Here at Four Locks mule barn, mules rested during the winter months. Boat captains left their mules here, paying a mule tended to care for them. Often the mules grew thin because the keeper did not feed the mules as well as their owners . . . Map (db m15278) HM
16Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Nathan WilliamsA Prosperous Farm
Nathan Williams was the son of Samuel “Big Sam” Williams, a slave who in 1826 bought freedom for himself, his wife, and his four children. In 1839, the elder Williams purchased a farm near Four Locks, about 3.5 miles east of Fort . . . Map (db m5571) HM
17Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . Map (db m820) HM
18Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . Map (db m32677) HM
19Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Three Eras of Transportation Side by SideWestern Maryland Rail Trail
Facing west, the C&O Canal is visible at the lower left. The coming of the railroad helped to end the usefulness of canals. To the right is the Interstate 70 bridge over the creek. The building of modern roads played a part in making the Western . . . Map (db m96153) HM
20Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Veterans Memorial
A memorial to those who went and never returned to honor those who served and kept us safe our service men and women of the Big Pool, District 15 area Map (db m139131) WM
21Maryland (Washington County), Big Spring — Four Locks
Four Locks – locks 47 through 50 – were built between 1836 and 1838, all within a half-mile stretch of the canal. Nestled amongst these four locks, a close-knit community thrived while the canal was in operation. Businesses prospered, meeting the . . . Map (db m36716) HM
22Maryland (Washington County), Big Spring — Lancelot Jacques
A French Hugenot who in partnership with Thomas Johnson in 1768 built "Green Spring Furnace." He and Johnson dissolved partnership in 1776 when Johnson became first governor of Maryland. Jacques' house built about 1766.Map (db m47120) HM
23Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — “Crampton’s Gap” “Maryland Heights” and “Pleasant Valley”
Important points during the first invasion of Maryland by the Army of the Confederacy in 1862.Map (db m1879) HM
24Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — 13th N.C. Regiment of Gen. Garland's Brigade
On the morning of September 14, 1862, Brig. General Samuel Garland deployed his troops along the Ridge Rd. (Lamb's Knoll Rd.). The 13th North Carolina under the command of Lt. Col. Thomas Ruffin, Jr. in his report describes the morning action. . . . Map (db m158409) HM
25Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — 1732Milestones in the Life of Washington
1732: Born, Westmoreland Co. VA.Map (db m145971) HM
26Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — 1749 / 1753-58[Milestones in the Life of Washington]
1749: Surveyor of Culpepper Co., Va. 1753-58: Officer in French and Indian WarMap (db m145972) HM
27Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — 1759 / 1758-74[Milestones in the Life of Washington]
1759: Marries Martha Custis. 1758-74: Member, VA. House of Burgesses.Map (db m145973) HM
28Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — 1774 / 1775[Milestones in the Life of Washington]
1774: VA. Delegate to 1st Continental Congress 1775: Appointed Commander-in-ChiefMap (db m145974) HM
29Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — 1776 / 1777[Milestones in the Life of Washington]
1776: Loses N.Y. to British Declaration signed 1777: British occupy Philadelphia Winter at Valley ForgeMap (db m145977) HM
30Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — 1781 / 1783[Milestones in the Life of Washington]
1781: British surrender at Yorktown. 1783: British recognize American Independence.Map (db m145978) HM
31Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — 1789[Milestones in the Life of Washington]
1789: Federal Constitution ratified; Washington becomes PresidentMap (db m145979) HM
32Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Battle of BoonsboroBuying Time — Gettysburg Campaign —
Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart faced a difficult assignment: to locate the Union cavalry and prevent it from severing Gen. Robert E. Lee’s avenue of retreat to Williamsport and the Potomac River after the Battle of Gettysburg. The result was the . . . Map (db m1630) HM
33Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — BoonsboroLee's Headquarters — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
After Gen. Robert E. Lee issued Special Order 191 near Frederick dividing the Army of Northern Virginia into four columns, Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s command marched across South Mountain on September 10, 1862. His column . . . Map (db m122154) HM
34Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Cannon of Revolutionary War
(War of American Independence) 1775–1783 forged Mount Aetna, Maryland Dedicated July 4, 1906 Rededicated July 5, 1992 Charles F. Kauffman, Jr. Mayor, Town of Boonsboro Robert J. Shifler, Assistant Mayor • Kevin M. Chambers, Councilman • . . . Map (db m2005) HM
35Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Deaths of Two Generals“Hallo, Sam, I’m dead!” — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
The fight for Fox’s Gap on September 14, 1862, claimed the lives of two generals, one from each side. Confederate Gen. Samuel Garland, a Lynchburg, Virginia native, attended the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington and later obtained his law . . . Map (db m455) HM
36Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Devil's Backbone Dam Rehabilitation
Devil's Backbone Dam appears to be one of the few remaining original dams from the height of Washington County's flour production days of the early 19th century and a representative example of masonry dams that predate the Civil War. According to . . . Map (db m145989) HM
37Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . Map (db m1913) HM
38Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Gettysburg CampaignThe Battle of Boonsboro
Two U.S. Cavalry divisions repulsed five rebel cavalry brigades in a day-long fight north of Boonsboro on July 8, 1863. The South Mountain passes remained open to the Federal Army in pursuit of the Confederates retreating from Gettyburg via . . . Map (db m7008) HM
39Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Gravesite of William Boone
Gravesites of William Boone, d. 1798 and his wife Susanna Parks Boone, b. 1755 - d. 1844 William and his brother, George, founded Boone's Berry, now known as Boonsboro, in 1792 The graves are located near the original Boone . . . Map (db m107565) HM
40Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — John Collins
Native of Frederick County, skilled hunter and a superintendent of provisions with the Lewis and Clark expedition, John Collins was the first Marylander to cross the North American continent. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark were charged by Thomas . . . Map (db m1904) HM
41Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Korean War Memorial
With honor for those who served in KoreaMap (db m145986) WM
42Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Maj. Gen. Jesse L. Reno
(front) 9th Army Corps. September 14, 1862. Reno. (west side) This monument marks the spot where Major Gen. Jesse Lee Reno, commanding 9th Army Corps U.S. Vol’s, was killed in battle Sept. 14, 1862. (south . . . Map (db m158614) WM
43Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Near Here in Wise’s Field
Near here in Wise's field on the morning of Sept. 14, 1862, Brigadier General Samuel Garland, Jr. C.S.A. of Lynchburg, Virginia fell mortally wounded while leading his men.Map (db m429) HM
44Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Stonewall Jackson's Way
Under Special Order 191, Maj. Gen Thomas J. Jackson led Confederate troops from Frederick to capture Harper's Ferry. On Sept. 11, 1862, Jackson's Second Corps moved by this road from its encampment near Boonsborough to cross the Potomac at . . . Map (db m3912) HM
45Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — S580C — Stonewall Regiment
More than 90,000 Michigan men served in the Union Army and Navy during the Civil War. The 17th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment was mustered at the Detroit Barracks in August 1862 under the command of Colonel William H. Withington. The . . . Map (db m158389) HM
46Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The "Wiregrass" Georgians50th Georgia Regiment, CSA
A few hundred feet north of this site, the 50th Georgia Infantry Regiment, of Brig. Gen. Thomas F. Drayton's Brigade, was decimated by elements of Gen. Orlando B. Willcox's 3,600-man Federal division on the late afternoon of September 14, 1862. . . . Map (db m158405) HM
47Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The Battle for Fox’s Gap“Hell is empty and all the devils are here.” — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
As Confederate Gen. D.H. Hill’s division struggled to hold the gaps of South Mountain on September 14, 1862, the fighting here at Fox’s Gap raged throughout the day. About 9 a.m., Gen. Jesse L. Reno’s corps attacked Confederate Gen. Samuel . . . Map (db m454) HM
48Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The Battle of Antietam or Sharpsburg
The bloodiest conflict of the War Between the States occurred September 17, 1862, a few miles from this point (Turn ← in the center of Boonsboro).Map (db m456) HM
49Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The Boys from Boonsboro DistrictWorld War: 1914 - 1918
[Street side]: [Emblem of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics] Erected in honor of the boys from Boonsboro District by South Mountain Council No. 88, Jr. O.U.A.M. and Citizens of the community. July 4th, 1919. . . . Map (db m16491) HM
50Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The First Completed Monument Dedicated to the Memory of George Washington
In commemoration of the first completed monument dedicated to the memory of George Washington. Citizens of Boonsboro on July 4, 1827 marched behind the Stars and Stripes to this site and built the tower to 15 feet. They returned to . . . Map (db m129050) HM
51Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The Lost Orders
No other document of the Civil War has generated so much controversy as Lee's Special Orders No. 191. These “Lost Orders” detailed the movements of Lee's army for the operation against Harpers Ferry. On September 9 Lee sent copies of the order to . . . Map (db m2042) HM
52Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The Maryland Campaign of 1862
On September 4, 1862, General Robert E. Lee, hoping to shorten the war by winning a decisive victory on Northern soil, crossed the Potomac River into Maryland. Lee planned to draw the Army of the Potomac through South Mountain into Pennsylvania and . . . Map (db m2041) HM
53Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . Map (db m1911) HM
54Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Town of BoonsboroMaryland uses Macadam to Complete the National Road — The Historic National Road - The Road That Built The Nation —
The National Road from Baltimore to Cumberland was comprised of a series of privately funded turnpikes. By 1822, the road was complete except for the ten miles between Boonsboro and Hagerstown. In August of the year, under pressure from the state . . . Map (db m1162) HM
55Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — T.P. 1 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 1
Between September 4th and 7th, 1862, the Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee, commanding, crossed the Potomac near Leesburg and occupied Frederick, Maryland. On the 10th a movement was made to surround and capture the Union forces at . . . Map (db m1594) HM
56Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — T. P. 2 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 2
In the advance of the Union forces to repel the invasion of Maryland by the Confederates, the Army of the Potomac commanded by Major General Geo. B. McClellan, moved northward from Washington with its front extending from near the Baltimore and Ohio . . . Map (db m1595) HM
57Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — T. P. 3 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 3
Hill's five brigades were encamped at and around Boonsboro to prevent the escape of the Union forces at Harper's Ferry, through Pleasant Valley. Informed that two Union brigades were approaching Turner's Pass, Hill, on the evening of September 13, . . . Map (db m1596) HM
58Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — T. P. 4 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 4
Cox’s Division of the Ninth Corps moved from Middletown at 6 A. M., September 14, by the Frederick and Hagerstown Pike, turned to the left at Koogle’s Mill, on the Catoctin, nearly four miles southeast of this, and, marching on the old Sharpsburg . . . Map (db m1597) HM
59Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — T. P. 5 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 5
During the contest at Fox's Gap, Hooker's (First) Corps was operating east and northeast of this point. The First Corps left the Monocacy at daybreak, passed through Frederick and Middletown and between 3 and 4 P. M., leaving Gibbon's Brigade on the . . . Map (db m1598) HM
60Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — T. P. 6 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 6
When Hooker moved to the right at Bolivar by way of the Hagerstown road, Gibbon continued on the main road and attacked Colquitt, in position about 700 yards southeast of this point. He drove Colquitt's skirmishers and reached the bend in the road . . . Map (db m1599) HM
61Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Vietnam Memorial
With honor for those who served in VietnamMap (db m145983) WM
62Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Washington MonumentSignal Station — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
During the Antietam Campaign, the U.S. Signal Corps used the stone structure in front of you and to your left as a signal station. On July 4, 1827, citizens of the town of Boonsboro paraded to the top of the mountain here and began building this . . . Map (db m1161) HM
63Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Washington MonumentSignal Station — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
During the Antietam Campaign, the U.S. Signal Corps used the stone structure as a signal station. On July 4, 1827, citizens of the town of Boonsboro paraded to the top of the mountain here and began building this first monument in the country . . . Map (db m1886) HM
64Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Washington Monument State ParkHome of First Completed Monument to Honor George Washington
Background Overshadowed by the Battle of Antietam (near Sharpsburg), which took place three days later and resulted in a loss of 23,000 men, the Battle of South Mountain nevertheless played a crucial role in determining the outcome of . . . Map (db m129047) HM
65Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Welcome to Historic Wise's Field
The land around you was the scene of heavy fighting during the Battle of South Mountain on September 14, 1862. This property is owned by the Central Maryland Heritage League, a non-profit organization. We depend on donations to maintain the land . . . Map (db m198105) HM
66Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — World Wars I & II Memorial
Dedicated to the Men & Women of Boonsboro & Vicinity Who Served in World Wars I & IIMap (db m145984) WM
67Maryland (Washington County), Brownsville — Battle of Maryland HeightsMaryland's First Civil War Battle — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
(Preface): After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's smashing victory over Union Gen. John Pope at the Second Battle of Manassas, Lee decided to invade the North to reap the fall harvest, gain Confederate recruits, earn foreign recognition, and . . . Map (db m144916) HM
68Maryland (Washington County), Brownsville — Brownsville-Burkittsville Pass
Marching from Middletown to seize Maryland Heights, McLaws’ and Anderson’s Confederate Divisions crossed South Mountain by this road September 11, 1862. On September 14th Manly’s N.C. Battery and elements of Semmes’ Brigade defended the pass and . . . Map (db m144952) HM
69Maryland (Washington County), Brownsville — St. Luke’s Episcopal ChurchBrownsville, Maryland — Founded 1837 —
During the civil war, St. Luke’s served as headquarters for General Lafayette McLaws, whose troops from the Army of Northern Virginia were bivouacked around Brownsville, September 11, 1862. It served as a hospital for his wounded following the . . . Map (db m144951) HM
70Maryland (Washington County), Cascade — War Returns to South MountainBattle of Monterey Pass — Gettysburg Campaign —
(Preface):After a stunning victory at Chancellorsville in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia through Maryland into Pennsylvania, marching next to threaten Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C. . . . Map (db m31048) HM
71Maryland (Washington County), Cearfoss — Crossing the Mason and DixonPennsylvania, at Last! — Gettysburg Campaign —
Four thousands of Confederates in Gen. Robert E. Lee's invasion of the North in 1863, the rate of march exceeded thirty miles a day. Since this part of Maryland is so narrow, splashing across the Potomac River in the morning and crossing the Mason . . . Map (db m11608) HM
72Maryland (Washington County), Cearfoss — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . Map (db m11609) HM
73Maryland (Washington County), Cearfoss — Mason and Dixon Line105th Mile Stone
500 feet beyond this point, on private property, this stone is located. It bears the coat of arms of Lord Baltimore and William Penn. the 104th mile stone and the 103rd mile stone bear the letters M and P Maryland-Pennsylvania and are located along . . . Map (db m11610) HM
74Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — “The Bank Road”(The Cumberland Turnpike Road)
The portion of this highway from the west end of the Conococheague bridge to Cumberland (40 miles) was built between 1816 and 1821. The banks of Maryland financed it by purchase of the stock.Map (db m699) HM
75Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — A Road Nurtures A VisionThe Historic National Road and Clear Spring — The Historic National Road - The Road That Built The Nation —
“The citizens at all times aim to be surpassed by no other town in the County.” –Martin Lehr, Clear Spring historian, 1890’s. In 1821, Martin Myers chose a site that straddled a “clear spring” at the foot . . . Map (db m694) HM
76Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Capt. Samuel G. Prather
In memory of Capt. Samuel G. Prather. Who raised and commanded the 2nd Co. of the Potomac Home Brigade Maryland (Vols.) in Great Rebellion of 1861 against the only Free Government on the earth and died at his post of duty October 15, 1861 in the . . . Map (db m25140) WM
77Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Clear Spring
The spring from which the Town of Clear Spring acquired its name.Map (db m693) HM
78Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Clear Spring Veterans Memorial
This memorial is dedicated to all those who have served honorably in the armed forces of the United States of America. The citizens of Clear Spring, Maryland area thank you and your families for your service and sacrifice.Map (db m67350) WM
79Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Dam No. 5
From December 17 to 20, 1861, Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson attempted to halt traffic on the canal by diverting the river around the Virginia abutment of Dam No. 5. Damage was slight and repairs were effected within two days.Map (db m122840) HM
80Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Fort FrederickMaryland State Park
Colonial stone fort built 1756 for Province of Maryland by Gov. Horatio Sharpe to protect frontier against French and Indians after Braddock’s defeat. Detention camp for British prisoners 1776–83. Occupied 1861–2 by Union troops. George Washington . . . Map (db m680) HM
81Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Fort Mills
One of the four stockade forts erected in 1756 along the North Mount Road as supports for Fort Frederick in preventing the Indians from descending upon the inhabitants living in the Cumberland Valley.Map (db m5930) HM
82Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Gen. J. E. B. Stuart’s
Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's cavalry on his raid around the Federal army, Oct. 19, 1862, crossed the National Road here after crossing the Potomac River at McCoy’s Ferry three miles south of this point.Map (db m682) HM
83Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . Map (db m695) HM
84Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . Map (db m60555) HM
85Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — McCoy's Ferry
On May 23, 1861 Confederates attempting to capture the ferry boat at McCoy's Landing were driven off by the Clear Spring Guard. Here on October 10, 1862, Gen. J.E.B. Stuart crossed the Potomac on his second ride around McClellan's army.Map (db m3914) HM
86Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Miller's Tavern & Spickler's Buggy FactorySurreys, Stagecoaches and Tin Lizzies
The Miller Hotel was one of the most popular destinations along the National Road in Washington County. Traveler T.B. Seabright recalled in 1894 “There were large rooms adapted to dancing purposes, and young men and maidens of the vicinity . . . Map (db m60556) HM
87Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Protecting Cultural ResourcesChesapeake and Ohio National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Floods occur at regular intervals in the Potomac Valley. Between 1829 and 1998 there have been 144 recorded floods or high water occurrences. repairing flood damage was a continuing battle for the C&O Canal Company and is still a problem for the . . . Map (db m25142) HM
88Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Stonewall Jackson at Dam 5Chesapeake and Ohio National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
At the outbreak of the Civil War, Maryland became a border between the Confederacy and the Union. The Confederacy knew that the canal and railroad were important Union supply lines. Stonewall Jackson’s Brigade made several attempts to destroy Dam 5 . . . Map (db m23561) HM
89Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — The Federal Signal Station
The Federal Signal Station near this point was captured Oct. 10, 1862 by a detachment of Gen. J. E. B. Stuart's Cavalry. On clear days this station could communicate with stations on South Mountain which relayed messages via Catoctin Mt. to Sugar . . . Map (db m149432) HM
90Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Vital CrossroadsClear Springs in the Civil War
This was a lively Unionist community on the important National Road during the war. In nearby Four Locks on January 31, 1861, local residents raised a 113-foot-high “Union Pole” with a streamer proclaiming the “Union Forever.” Many local men . . . Map (db m60553) HM
91Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Wilson’s StoreStore of Three Wonders
"You wonder if we have it. We wonder where it is. You wonder how we found it!” That is how Janice Keefer remembered her father’s store during the 42 years that Dorsey Martin conducted business here. Originally opened by Rufus Wilson in 1850, . . . Map (db m4932) HM
92Maryland (Washington County), Conococheague — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . Map (db m5925) HM
93Maryland (Washington County), Dargan — Confederate InvasionFive Years Later … — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee sent Gen. Jubal A. Early's corps from the Richmond battlefield to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter's army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early invaded Maryland . . . Map (db m169873) HM
94Maryland (Washington County), Dargan — John Brown
and his associates collected arms and ammunition on the Kennedy Farm (Samples Manor) in Maryland for months prior to the raid on the arsenal at Harpers Ferry, October 17, 1859Map (db m1988) HM
95Maryland (Washington County), Dargan — John Brown, 59, HangedIn Memoriam
In Memoriam To the Provisional Army of the United States of America and their presence at Kennedy Farm the Summer of 1859 John Brown, 59, Hanged Annie Brown, 16, Sent Home Martha Brown, 17, Sent Home John Henry Kagi, 24, Killed . . . Map (db m151957) HM
96Maryland (Washington County), Dargan — Kennedy Farm
Kennedy Farm Has Been Designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses National significance in commemorating the history of the United States of America 1974 National Park Service United States Department of the . . . Map (db m151983) HM
97Maryland (Washington County), Dargan — Kennedy FarmStaging and Planning John Brown's Harpers Ferry Raid
This is the Kennedy farmhouse, which abolitionist John Brown (using the pseudonym Isaac Smith) leased in July 1859 from Dr. Robert Kennedy's heirs, ostensibly to do some prospecting. Brown's fifteen-year-old daughter, Annie Brown, identified the . . . Map (db m169872) HM
98Maryland (Washington County), Ernstville — Ernstville Road BridgeWestern Maryland Rail Trail
The Ernstville Road Bridge was constructed in 1930 to carry motor vehicles on Ernstville Road safely over the Western Maryland Railway. From 1904 until the construction of the bridge, vehicles traveling on the road between Ernstville and Big Pool . . . Map (db m148827) HM
99Maryland (Washington County), Fairplay — Jones’s CrossroadsForts Facing Forts
For the first time since the Battle of Gettysburg, most of the Union army faced Gen. Robert E. Lee on July 12, 1863. The Federals were firmly entrenched on a ridge parallel to the Sharpsburg-Hagerstown Turnpike a quarter mile west. Less than a mile . . . Map (db m1990) HM
100Maryland (Washington County), Fort Ritchie — D-Day Anniversary
On this day, June 6, in the year 1944 allied forces invaded Normandy - the most massive invasion attempt in history. By nightfall, they had liberated 80 miles of French soil and a toehold for the consequential drive into Germany was established. . . . Map (db m103019) HM

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May. 21, 2022