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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Historical Markers and War Memorials in Lubbock County, Texas

 
Clickable Map of Lubbock County, Texas and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Lubbock County, TX (101) Crosby County, TX (35) Floyd County, TX (20) Garza County, TX (30) Hale County, TX (43) Hockley County, TX (11) Lamb County, TX (21) Lynn County, TX (18) Terry County, TX (33)  LubbockCounty(101) Lubbock County (101)  CrosbyCounty(35) Crosby County (35)  FloydCounty(20) Floyd County (20)  GarzaCounty(30) Garza County (30)  HaleCounty(43) Hale County (43)  HockleyCounty(11) Hockley County (11)  LambCounty(21) Lamb County (21)  LynnCounty(18) Lynn County (18)  TerryCounty(33) Terry County (33)
Lubbock is the county seat for Lubbock County
Adjacent to Lubbock County, Texas
      Crosby County (35)  
      Floyd County (20)  
      Garza County (30)  
      Hale County (43)  
      Hockley County (11)  
      Lamb County (21)  
      Lynn County (18)  
      Terry County (33)  
 
Touch name on this list to highlight map location.
Touch blue arrow, or on map, to go there.
1Texas, Lubbock County, Becton — 14531 — Becton Cemetery
On County Highway 3600, 0.5 miles north of County Highway 5300, on the right when traveling north.
Tennessee native Abner M. Becton moved to the Estacado area in the late 1890s. There, he met and wed Cornelia Bryant. The couple moved in 1898 to land in this area, where W.E. Bledsoe had already established a ranch. The small community became . . . Map (db m168608) HM
2Texas, Lubbock County, Buffalo Springs — 18590 — V-8 Ranch
On Farm to Market Road 835, 2.7 miles north of Highway 84, on the left when traveling north.
Nestled into a small, shallow valley created by a bend in the north fork of the double mountain fork of the Brazos River, the 1,500-acre V-8 Ranch contains the headquarters of the vast Ioa ranch, which was a 14 by 30-mile contiguous block of . . . Map (db m168604) HM
3Texas, Lubbock County, Idalou — 1504 — Estacado Cemetery
On Unnamed Road, 0.5 miles east of N County Road 3900, in the median.
In 1878 Paris Cox (1846-1888), an Indiana Quaker, visited this area with a group of buffalo hunters. Attracted by the abundance of cheap farm land, he returned to Indiana and began advertising his plans for a Quaker colony here. Although the first . . . Map (db m174020) HM
4Texas, Lubbock County, Idalou — 13497 — Idalou CemeteryHistoric Texas Cemetery
On U.S. 62, 0.4 miles east of County Highway 3500, on the right when traveling east.
John William Turner, Jr. and his wife, Mary Alice, deeded two acres of their farm as a burial ground in January 1921. The first burial was for their infant nephew, Weldon Fred Turner, whose grave is indicated by a homemade marker. In May of that . . . Map (db m106239) HM
5Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — "80" John HouseC. 1900
Near 4th Street (County Road 2255) east of Indiana Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
Daniel Webster Wallace, "80 John," was one of Texas' most successful black ranchers. Born the son of slave parents in Victoria County in 1860, he went to work as a cowboy when he was 15, eventually working for C.C. Slaughter, Isaac Ellwood, John . . . Map (db m191373) HM
6Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 6666 Barn1908
Near 4th Street.
The Four Sixes barn was built by Burk Burnett, an influential and prosperous Texas rancher. It housed expensive horses admired by some of the wealthiest men and women in the West. Appearing much as it did when in use at Burnett’s King County ranch, . . . Map (db m136052) HM
Paid Advertisement
7Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — A Tribute to Cotton
On Texas Avenue at Main Street, on the left when traveling south on Texas Avenue.
In the early 1900s, area pioneer farmers marketed bales of cotton on this site. Today, this cotton bale serves as a monument to those who made Lubbock County and the surrounding south plains the greatest producer of upland cotton in the world. In . . . Map (db m102084) HM
8Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 18255 — Arnett House
On Dover Avenue south of 21st Street, on the right when traveling south.
(Two markers identify this Craftsman Style Bungalow.) Bungalow style house built in 1915 at 1214 Ave. L in downtown Lubbock for Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Higginbotham. Designed by M.L. Waller of Fort Worth. Home of Mr. and Mrs. S.C. Arnett Sr. . . . Map (db m106431) HM
9Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 18255 — Arnett House
On 22nd Street.
First built as a wedding gift for J. Lanham and Glenn (Pratt) Higginbotham in 1915, the Arnett House became the longtime home of the family of Alice (Ford) and Sam C. Arnett, pioneer rancher and banker. For decades, Arnett served as a major . . . Map (db m212439) HM
10Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Austin Brothers Bridge
On Cesar East Chavez Drive, 0.1 miles North University Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
Steel bridge erected 1913 across Yellowhouse Canyon on the Lubbock-Abernathy Road. Contract awarded April 1913 to Austin Brothers Bridge Company of Dallas by the Lubbock County Commissioners. The 60 foot long, 12 foot wide, single-span, Warren type . . . Map (db m52148) HM
11Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 273 — Bacon Home
On West Broadway Street, on the right when traveling west.
(Two markers identify this early two-story brick home.) Neo-classical style house built 1916 for Warren A. and Myrta Hunt Bacon. Designed by W.M. Rice of Amarillo. Bacon, a successful businessman and civic leader, lived in Lubbock . . . Map (db m106428) HM
12Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Bairfield Schoolhousec.1890
Near Fourth Street west of Flint Avenue (U.S. 82), on the left when traveling west.
One-room schools were built to serve the families of cowboys, ranches and homesteaders. Classroom furniture was homemade, and wooden boards were painted black for chalkboards. A bucket of water from a well or stream provided drinks for everyone, . . . Map (db m135238) HM
13Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Barton House1909
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
Joseph J. Barton believed a new railroad, Santa Fe's Panhandle Short Line, was to run through his ranch property. To capitalize on that, he built for his family a late Queen Anne-style home as the capstone of his planned community named Bartonsite. . . . Map (db m135418) HM
Paid Advertisement
14Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 434 — Bledsoe Santa Fe Depot
On 19th Street east of Juneau Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
A relic from one of America's last frontiers. Built in 1925 on range land of newly organized Cochran County, at Bledsoe, this structure not only served its purpose as a railroad station, but was a meeting hall for churches and social groups. . . . Map (db m73612) HM
15Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 484 — Bradford Knapp(Dec. 24, 1870 – June 11, 1938)
Known for his leadership in the field of agricultural education, Bradford Knapp served as first director of the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service and helped plan and carry out World War I overseas food production for the Agriculture Department. He . . . Map (db m106375) HM
16Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 17262 — Breedlove Airport
On East 50th Street, 0.4 miles east of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, on the right when traveling east.
When Charles Lindbergh was traveling the U.S. by airplane on a speaking tour, he was unable to land at Lubbock because there was no airport at the time. City leaders and aviation enthusiasts, determined to see that Lubbock would not miss out on the . . . Map (db m73586) HM
17Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Buddy Holly1936 - 1959
On 7th Street at 8th Street, on the left when traveling west on 7th Street. Reported missing.
Buddy Holly contributed to the music heritage of not only west Texas but the entire world as a musician and composer. It is significant that this first plaque on the "Walk Of Fame" bear his name. The citizens of Lubbock pay tribute to and honor . . . Map (db m4499) HM
18Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Buddy Holly1936 – 1959
Near 19th Street at Crickets Avenue.
Buddy Holly contributed to the music heritage of not only west Texas but the entire world as a musician and composer. It is significant that this first plaque on the "Walk of Fame" bear his name. The citizens of Lubbock pay tribute to and honor . . . Map (db m73562) HM
19Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 18312 — Buddy Holly
On Crickets Avenue north of Highway 62, on the right when traveling north.
Charles Hardin "Buddy” Holley was born in Lubbock on September 7, 1936, to Ella Pauline (Drake) and Lawrence Odell "L.O.” Holley. The youngest of four children, Buddy grew up in a musical household, with his mother and siblings singing and . . . Map (db m160996) HM
20Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Buddy Holly Historical MarkerCity of Lubbock Cemetery
On East 31st Street near Teak Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
Buddy Holly died at age 22 in a plane crash near Clear Lake, Iowa on February 3, 1959. Fellow musicians Ritchie Valens and J.P. Richardson were also killed in the crash. The funeral was held in Tabernacle Baptist Church and he was buried in the City . . . Map (db m73583) HM
Paid Advertisement
21Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 729 — Carlisle Cemetery
On 19th Street, 0.1 miles west of Upland Avenue, on the right when traveling west.
The pioneer Carlisle community was named for W. Augustus “Uncle Gus” Carlisle (1849-1920), who settled here with his wife Lizzie (Spikes) (d. 1914) in 1890. A cattleman and a prominent landowner, Carlisle made significant contributions . . . Map (db m73613) HM
22Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Carlock Building
On Texas Avenue at 13th Street, on the right when traveling south on Texas Avenue.
Art deco style office building constructed in 1930 as the new Cotton Exchange Building. Designed by J.B. Davies & Co., Fort Worth, for J.D. Doughty and J.B. Kerby of Weatherford. Now the Carlock Building, it symbolizes the rapid growth of cotton . . . Map (db m111493) HM
23Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 12968 — City of Lubbock Cemetery
On East 31st Street, 0.1 miles east of Teak Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
In March 1892, a delegation of Lubbock residents requested five acres of pasture land from rancher H.M. Bandy for use as a cemetery. That same month, they held the first burial, that of a Cochran County cowboy, Henry Jenkins, who died of pneumonia . . . Map (db m73584) HM
24Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 966 — Colonel T. S. Lubbock / Texas in the Civil War
On Texas Avenue south of Main Street, on the left when traveling south.
County named for Texas Confederate Colonel T. S. Lubbock 1817 – 1862 South Carolinian. Came to Texas 1835. Indian fighter, soldier, businessman. Member Secession Convention. Went to Virginia hoping to fight for South in first . . . Map (db m155402) HM WM
25Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Congressional Medal of Honor RecipientsCity of Lubbock Cemetery
In 1861, shortly after the first shots of the Civil War, America established the Congressional Medal of Honor. Given for extraordinary valor and sacrifice, it is the highest military decoration presented by the U.S. Government. Three medal . . . Map (db m106403) HM WM
26Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 18593 — Congressman George Mahon
On 9th Street at Avenue L, on the left when traveling east on 9th Street.
George Herman Mahon (1900-1985) was born in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, to John Kirkpatrick and Lola Willis (Brown) Mahon. In 1908, the family moved to Loraine (Mitchell County), Texas where George grew up on a cotton farm and graduated . . . Map (db m168593) HM
27Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 18809 — Dagley Field
On 34th Street at Toledo Avenue, on the right when traveling east on 34th Street.
Aircraft vastly changed the face of war and Dagley Field played a part in that transformation. As tensions mounted in the late 1930s, the United States created the Civilian Pilot Training Program (CPTP), administered by the Civil Aeronautics . . . Map (db m168596) HM
28Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Douglas DC-3/C-47/R4D-6S
On North Cedar Avenue, 0.1 miles east of Interstate 27, on the right when traveling north.
Before the U.S. entered World War II, the civilian aircraft known as the CF-3 had already flown over 300 million miles in domestic service. The DC-3 was the only transport aircraft being manufactured in large quantities at the beginning of the . . . Map (db m135234) HM
29Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — El Capote Cabinc. 1838
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
This cabin was built during the Republic of Texas period (1836-1845) and represents the simple architecture of early frontier days. Located in what is now Guadalupe County Texas, it was constructed of winged elm logs chinked with mud from a nearby . . . Map (db m135409) HM
30Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — F W & D South Plains Railway Depot
On Crickets Avenue, 0.1 miles north of 19th Street (Texas Highway 114), on the right when traveling north.
Spanish Renaissance Revival Passenger and Freight Depot built 1928 for $45,889. Architect Wyatt C. Hedrick of Fort Worth also designed the administration building on Texas Tech campus. Built by F. A. Mote of Dallas. Completion of the Fort Worth a & . . . Map (db m73567) HM
31Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 20075 — First Christian Church(Disciples of Christ)
On Broadway at Avenue X, on the right when traveling east on Broadway.
Sixteen charter members formally organized the First Christian Church of Lubbock in the summer of 1901. For many years, members met in various homes, public buildings and other area churches. In Aug. 1908, the church announced construction . . . Map (db m168588) HM
32Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 1762 — First Methodist Church of Lubbock
On West Broadway Street at Avenue M, on the right when traveling east on West Broadway Street.
This congregation traces its history to 1892, when circuit riding minister R. M. Morris and 12 charter members organized the Lubbock Methodist Church. Early worship services were held in the schoolhouse and the Lubbock County Courthouse. In 1900 the . . . Map (db m73560) HM
33Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Forks of the Brazos
On Cesar E. Chavez Drive, 0.4 miles north of East Broadway, on the left when traveling north.
In the summer of 1878, O.W. Williams and E.M. Powell began a survey of Lubbock County. It began at this point where the two forks of the Brazos River meet. They erected a rock mound at the S.W. corner of survey 1, block A. using this as a starting . . . Map (db m106363) HM
34Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Fort Worth Spudderc. 1935 - 1945
Near 4th Street, on the left when traveling north.
The discovery of oil on ranchland allowed ranchers to continue operations and assured their survival for several generations. Portable cable-tool drilling rigs replaced the standard rigs used to drill the majority of the world's oil . . . Map (db m191465) HM
35Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 12678 — General Ranald Slidell Mackenzie
On Cesar E Chavez Drive, 0.2 miles north of Canyon Lake Drive, on the right when traveling north.
Born in New York City on July 24, 1840, Mackenzie attained the rank of major general during the Civil War. On February 25, 1871, at Fort Concho, Texas, he assumed command as colonel of the 4th Cavalry, which soon became the finest regiment in the . . . Map (db m168522) HM
36Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Harrell House1883, 1900, 1917
Near 4th Street near Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
The Harrell House represents the expansion of a dwelling as the family grew and fortunes increased. This house began as a single stacked rock room in 1883. Next, two box and strip rooms were added to the east side of the stone house. Last the other . . . Map (db m135419) HM
37Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Hedwig's HillDogtrot House — 1855 - 56 —
Near 4th Street.
In Mason County, Texas, near the Llano River, this house was built as two log cabins under a common roof separated by a breezeway called a dogtrot. The limestone rooms in the back were added later. The style of architecture is characteristic of . . . Map (db m135407) HM
38Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Hoffman Barnc.1906
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
In the early 20th Century, Lawrence H. (L.H.) Jones drove cattle from ranch land in Scurry County to the Texas and Pacific railhead at Colorado City, Texas. From there the cattle were shipped to the Fort Worth stockyards. This barn was built in . . . Map (db m136245) HM
39Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 12723 — Isham and Texana Tubbs House
On Fulton Avenue south of 6th Street, on the right when traveling south.
Isham Tubbs (1852-1947) married Texana Spikes (1857-1930) in Kaufman County in 1877. They moved to the Monterey area of Lubbock County circa 1890. Isham became one of the first school board trustees and a charter member of Lubbock's first United . . . Map (db m73611) HM
40Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — J.I. Allison House circa 1950s
On U.S. 62 at Crickets Avenue, on the right when traveling west on U.S. 62.
Originally located at 2215 6th Street, this house was preserved to commemorate the song writing of Buddy Holly and the Crickets. While at this home in 1956, Buddy Holly and J.I. Allison (original founding members of The Crickets) penned the hit . . . Map (db m102086) HM
41Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — JA Oat Bin
Near 4th Street, on the left when traveling north.
This wooden water tank was originally used for one year in the Griffin pasture. It held a reserve water supply to help water 3,000 cows. It was moved to the ranch headquarters more than seventy years ago and has been used as the ranch oat bin . . . Map (db m191462) HM
42Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — JA Oat Bin/Monitor Vaneless L Model Windmill
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
(left side) JA Oat Bin c. 1890 This water tank was first used around 1890 in the Griffin pasture on the JA Ranch in Palo Duro Canyon, Texas. It held a reserve water supply for 3,000 head of cattle. Moved to the ranch . . . Map (db m136050) HM
43Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Jowell Cemetery1876 - 1889
Near 4th St.
Frontier life was hard on young children, and many lived only a short time. Such common, present-day illnesses as colds, fever and measles could be deadly to children of the 19th century. The ornate stone tablets note the births and deaths . . . Map (db m135412) HM
44Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Jowell House1872-73
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
This fortress-style home was built in Palo Pinto Country, Texas, to protect a pioneer family from dangers in the wilderness. After George Jowell's wood cabin was burned by Indians, he designed a home of cut limestone and sandstone with rifle slits . . . Map (db m135410) HM
45Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Landwer/Manicapelli Home
Near Cesar East Chavez Drive, 0.4 miles North University Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
Spanish mission style home built 1936 for Dr. and Mrs. M. F. Landwer from Dr. Landwer's design. Landwer was professor of zoology at Texas Technological College from 1927 until his retirement. Virginia Landwer taught biology at Lubbock High School . . . Map (db m52149) HM
46Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Locomotive1923
Near 4th Street, on the left when traveling north.
Built as coal burner by the Baldwin Locomotive Works of Philadelphia, Pa., the engine originally ran on the Burlington Northern's main line. It was later converted to oil. Behind the locomotive are wooden Santa Fe cattle cars, one being . . . Map (db m191355) HM
47Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Los CorralitosThe Little Corrals — c. 1780 —
Near 4th Street.
Los Corralitos was a fortified home in Zapata County, Texas. Made from cut sandstone, mud mortar, mesquite and Montezuma cypress, its walls are 33 inches (one Spanish vara) thick. The single room has one door, no windows and six small gun ports for . . . Map (db m136044) HM
48Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 14380 — Lubbock Cotton Club
On Southeast Drive, 0.1 miles north of East 50th Street, on the left when traveling north.
In 1938, Clyde Trusty opened a ballroom in a renovated army quonset hut at this site. The Lubbock Cotton Club hosted well-known orchestras and big bands popular at the time. The venue expanded the following year, with room for 1600 people on one . . . Map (db m168594) HM
49Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 14613 — Lubbock County
On Texas Avenue at Broadway, on the right when traveling south on Texas Avenue.
Formed from Young and Bexar territories Created August 21, 1876 Organized March 10, 1891 Named in honor of Colonel Thomas S. Lubbock 1817 - 1862 Member of the New Orleans Greys at the storming of Bexar, commander of a company in the Santa Fe . . . Map (db m168812) HM
50Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 3144 — Lubbock High School
On 19th Street (U.S. 62) at Avenue U, on the right when traveling west on 19th Street.
The city of Lubbock experienced a significant increase in population during the 1920s as it became the agricultural, educational, service, and trade center of the South Plains. This high school was built out of the need for providing an education . . . Map (db m73558) HM
51Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Lubbock Post Office and Federal Building800 Broadway — Built in 1932 —
On Broadway, on the right when traveling west.
Listed in the National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of the InteriorMap (db m136042) HM
52Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Lubbock Women's Club
On West Broadway Street east of Avenue U, on the right when traveling west.
(Two markers identify this two-story brick building.) Starting in 1944, several women’s organizations met to coordinate their community improvement efforts. In February 1945, 22 groups became charter members of the Lubbock women’s club. . . . Map (db m168611) HM
53Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 18589 — Lubbock's First Cotton Gin
On Avenue A, 0.1 miles north of East 19th Street, on the right when traveling north.
The Lubbock Cotton Gin Company operated at a site 1/10 mile northeast in the 1900s and 1910s. Until 1903, the nearest gins were over 100 miles away, thus limiting any local experiments with growing cotton. However, after the first small . . . Map (db m168529) HM
54Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 3181 — Mackenzie Scout Trail
On Broadway Street east of Buddy Holly Avenue, on the right when traveling west.
This marks one route of the Mackenzie Scout Trail extending from Camp Supply, Crosby County to Fort Sumner, New Mexico and used by the Army, 1872-1875, by buffalo hunters, 1876-1878, and by cattlemen 1878 until the fencing of the range. Erected by . . . Map (db m106404) HM
55Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 16689 — Mary & Mac Private School
On East 28th Street at Ivory Avenue, on the left when traveling west on East 28th Street.
In 1954, Lucille Graves established Mary & Mac Private School as a preschool for African-American students. Named for a version of the hand-clapping song “Mary Mack,” emphasizing aspirations for the students to become contributing . . . Map (db m168538) HM
56Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Mast/White Home
On West Broadway Street at Avenue W, on the right when traveling east on West Broadway Street.
Originally located 2219 13th street, constructed 1925 by A.M. Hensley for C.S. Mast, member of the original faculty at Texas Technological College. Purchased by L.O. "Pop" and Ercil "Mom" White in 1948. Active in youth work, the Whites were . . . Map (db m73549) HM
57Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Masterson JYBunkhouse — c. 1879 —
Near 4th Street, on the left when traveling north.
Home was wherever a cowboy hung his hat. At ranch headquarters, the bunkhouse was his home until he moved on again. This structure from King County, Texas, probably began as a half-dug-out on the site of a bufflo hunter's camp. Its walls and . . . Map (db m191378) HM
58Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Matador Half – Dugout1888
Near 4th Street.
Most first homes of ranches and settlers on the plains were half-dugouts. They were cut into embankments with the door facing southeast to catch cool breezes in summer. Roofs were made of hides, sod, thatch or, in this case, wood shingles. The roof . . . Map (db m136046) HM
59Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Matador Officec. 1880
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
Nicknamed the "Scotsmen’s Dive," this building began as the guesthouse for visiting representatives of the Scottish company that owned the Matador Ranch. Forty years later, the clapboard-walled house was converted to the business office for the huge . . . Map (db m136263) HM
60Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 15653 — Migrant Labor Camps of Lubbock County
On 1st Place west of Buddy Holly Avenue, on the right when traveling west.
Early Hispanic residents of frontier Lubbock County included ranch hands in the 1880s. Railroad lines brought many workers to the south plains, the majority recruited from El Paso. Rail companies built row houses near construction sites, and . . . Map (db m106351) HM
61Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 3443 — Monterey High School
On 47th Street east of Hartford Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
Opened in 1955. Named for town of Monterey, one of the two original townsites for Lubbock. It was founded in present northwest Lubbock by W. E. Rayner in 1890. In a unique compromise in 1891, Rayner joined the promoters of the other townsite to . . . Map (db m73547) HM
62Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 3491 — Mount Gilead Baptist Church
On Fir Avenue at East 26th Street, on the right when traveling south on Fir Avenue.
The organizational meeting for this congregation was held in October 1917 by the Rev. A. Wilson. Although early problems plagued the fellowship and many members left the church, a successful cotton harvest in September 1919 attracted more people to . . . Map (db m73582) HM
63Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 20095 — New Hope Baptist Church
On Birch Ave at East 20th Street, on the left when traveling north on Birch Ave.
Originally known as Mount Calvary Baptist, the historically African American New Hope Baptist Church organized in 1926 at 18th street and Avenue B, following a split from Caldonia Baptist Church. Under the tenure of Rev. G.H. Washington, the . . . Map (db m168537) HM
64Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 20114 — Nicolett Hotel
On Broadway at Buddy Holly Avenue, on the right when traveling west on Broadway.
In late 1888 and early 1889, Frank E. Wheelock and Rollie Burns, manager and employee, respectively, of the large Ioa Ranch, built the Nicolett Hotel on a high prairie just east of the present Lubbock Country Club. Wheelock named the building . . . Map (db m168542) HM
65Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Old Block Drift Fence1880s
Near 4th Street near Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
This historic fence ran 80 miles from the west end of the Capitan Mountains to Vaughn, N.M. The only part remaining is in Haspris Canyon on a ranch headquartered near Ancho. The fence kept livestock from drifting into unprotected areas. In "I Rode a . . . Map (db m135416) HM
66Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Old Mail Campc. 1875
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
This single-door, stacked rock structure with a pole and brush roof was located north of an old military and stageline road in Knox County, Texas. It may have served as a rest stop or way station for U.S. Army couriers in and out of Fort Griffin on . . . Map (db m135414) HM
67Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 17972 — Original Lubbock Municipal Airport
On North Cedar Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
Charles Lindbergh’s solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean in 1927 dramatically increased worldwide interest in aviation. To participate in this new and potentially significant technology, the City of Lubbock established a municipal airport about . . . Map (db m106284) HM
68Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Picket and Sotol House1904, 1905
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
Far West Texas offered little as building material. So early homesteaders used the yucca-like sotol plant—tall, woody stalks that grew from the center of the desert plants. Two rooms of the house were built with a framework of cedar posts and . . . Map (db m136049) HM
69Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Prairie Dog TownK. N. Clapp
On MacKenzie Park Road, on the right when traveling north.
The vision of Prairie Dog Town was conceived and implemented by K. N. Clapp in 1935. In the 1930's the government's poisoning program was becoming effective, and he was alarmed that the extinction of the black-tailed prairie dog would result. Mr. . . . Map (db m52146) HM
70Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 39 — Quanah Parker TrailTexas Plains Trail Region
Near Canyon Lake Drive north of East Broadway, on the right when traveling north.
Nomadic Indians gathered for food plants native to Yellow House Canyon hackberry · plum · grape · cactus fruit Arrow Sculptor: Charles A. SmithMap (db m173858) HM
71Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Reese AFB Texas
On South Reese Boulevard, 0.1 miles west of Research Boulevard, on the left when traveling west.
On 30 September 1997, Reese Air Force Base and the 64th Flying Training Wing were inactivated, culminating a tradition of “55 years of excellence” in serving our nation. Since 1942, 25,349 of the world's greatest pilots graduated from . . . Map (db m73616) HM
72Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 12039 — Reese Air Force Base
On Research Boulevard at South Reese Boulevard, on the left when traveling north on Research Boulevard.
Ten years of concentrated efforts by city officials led to the establishment of a U.S. Army Air Corps Advanced Flying School at Lubbock in the summer of 1941. Built ten miles west of the city, where barracks, runways and other military facilities . . . Map (db m73614) HM
73Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Ropes Depot1918
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
The wood-frame depot was built by the Santa Fe Railway in Hockley County, Texas. Railroads were essential to the settlement of West Texas and eastern New Mexico for transporting cattle, people, manufactured goods, supplies and lumber. The Ropes . . . Map (db m136238) HM
74Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 12680 — Site of Old Lubbock
On Interstate 27 Frontage Road, 0.6 miles north of Yucca Street, on the right when traveling north.
A predecessor of present Lubbock, this area was, in 1890, a subject of heated dispute by three factions (led by W.D. Crump, W.E. Rayner, and Frank Wheelock) that vied in the founding of the county seat. Unlike most county seat debaters in . . . Map (db m168520) HM
75Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 16427 — South Plains Army Air Field
On North Cedar Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
During World War II, nine preliminary and advanced military glider pilot training fields operated in Texas; one of the most prominent sites was located here. The U.S. Army Air Forces (USAAF) leased Lubbock Municipal Airport, and with help from the . . . Map (db m52147) HM
76Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 14893 — St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church
On Main Street at Avenue W, on the right when traveling east on Main Street.
Early Catholic settlers in Lubbock and on the Texas South Plains celebrated mass with traveling priests in private homes. Beginning in 1905, Father Joseph Keller traveled from Slaton to offer mass for Catholics at the Merrell Hotel. In December . . . Map (db m106429) HM
77Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Texas Tech Dairy Barn
Near Detroit Avenue south of 15th Street when traveling south.
The dairy barn and silo were constructed in 1926-27 and served as a teaching facility for 40 years. The barn was designed by Forth Worth architect W.C. Hedrick with the help of Ag Dean A.H. Leidigh and Prof. W.L. Stangel. Students brought their own . . . Map (db m54166) HM
78Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 5273 — Texas Tech Judging Pavilion
On 15th Street west of Boston Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
One of the first four buildings on the Texas Tech campus, the livestock judging pavilion was the school's first structure built specifically for agricultural education. Completed in the 1920s, it was designed by the noted Fort Worth architect Wyatt . . . Map (db m54165) HM
79Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 18313 — Texas Tech University Dairy Barn
Near Detroit Avenue, 0.1 miles south of 15th Street.
The dairy barn at Texas Tech University was completed in 1927 and was built to house the cows used by the Animal Husbandry Department. The barn and adjacent silo were designed by the architectural and engineering firm of Sanguinet, Staats & . . . Map (db m168598) HM
80Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — The Cactus TheaterCelebrate the Past…Savor the Present…Look into the Future
On Buddy Holly Avenue north of 19th Street (U.S. 62), on the left when traveling north.
The Cactus Theater, originally constructed in 1938, was Lubbock's first suburban neighborhood-oriented theater. It closed in 1958 until being revitalized in 1993 by a group of area investors, Cactus Theater Inc., headed by Don and Terri Caldwell. . . . Map (db m194558) HM
81Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 5340 — The Free Range Era of RanchingNorthwest Texas, 1878-1885
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
After Indians and buffalo were removed in 1870s, several hundred cattlemen with small herds came to rolling plains near site of later Lubbock, to graze free range. Vital natural water sources were found east of the Caprock, where springs and streams . . . Map (db m135423) HM
82Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 5376 — The Mast House
On West Broadway Street at Avenue W, on the right when traveling east on West Broadway Street.
This house was constructed in 1925 by prominent Lubbock builder A. M. Hensley for the family of Dr. Clarence S. Mast (d. 1936). Mast served as a physics professor on the original faculty of Texas Tech University. The home exhibits elements of the . . . Map (db m73548) HM
83Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — The McCartney Oak
On Crickets Avenue, on the right when traveling south.
Commemorating the historic concert of music legend Sir Paul McCartney in Lubbock, Texas on October 2, 2014 at the United Supermarkets Arena, and his admiration for Lubbock's own Buddy Holly.Map (db m163977) HM
84Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — The PitchforkRanch Cookhouse — c. 1900 —
Near 4th St.
The Pitchfork Ranch Cookhouse began as a one-room structure. The dining area was added in two sections. Though the exterior walls are covered in modern siding, the original wood plank siding is still intact underneath. The interior walls and ceiling . . . Map (db m136045) HM
85Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Typical Homesteader Cabin
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
Built in 1883. Shows pioneer way of life -- with the basic room of field stone, for protection from blizzards. Shed rooms attached gave storage and extra room. After turn of century, and better living was possible, owner added 3 rooms, double . . . Map (db m135422) HM
86Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 16945 — W. G. McMillan Construction Company
On North Cedar Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
W.G. McMillan came to Lubbock in 1924 to assist in the construction of the Hotel Lubbock. McMillan stayed, and over the next thirty years oversaw over 850 construction projects. Some of McMillan’s first projects included the 1926 Conoco service . . . Map (db m106282) HM
87Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Waggoner Ranch Commissaryc. 1870s
Near 4th Street west of Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
A commissary was used by large ranches to provide supplies for their cowboys and ranch hands. The great distance to town created a need for food and supplies to be bought in bulk. They were then distributed at headquarters and to distant line camps. . . . Map (db m136048) HM
88Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — Wild Cow CorralEarly 20th Century
Near 4th Street near Flint Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
Wild cow corrals were used for catching unbranded, free-roaming cattle in mountainous regions. The one was constructed in high terrian around Capitan, N.M., on the Block Ranch. Cowboys, or "brush poppers," as they were known in rough country, . . . Map (db m135417) HM
89Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — World War II Glider Pilots
On North Cedar Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
In memory of all World War II Glider Pilots who received advance training and silver “G” wings at South Plains Army Air Field, Lubbock Texas during the period of 13 July 1942 through 15 January 1945. These volunteers . . . Map (db m106283) HM WM
90Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbock — 14862 — Yellowhouse Canyon
On Cesar E. Chavez Drive, 0.2 miles north of Parkway Drive, on the right when traveling north.
Known to Spanish explorers of the 17th and 18th centuries - Described by Albert Pike who visited the region in 1832 - The last battle in Lubbock County between White buffalo hunters and the red men who had called the plains their own occurred on . . . Map (db m106352) HM
91Texas, Lubbock County, Lubbuck — Las Escarbadas1886
Near 4th Street, on the left when traveling north.
This building was one of seven division headquarters on the 3 million-acre XIT, the largest ranch under fence in the United States. The limestone structure in Deaf Smith County was home for the manager, a place for cowboys to eat, a . . . Map (db m191380) HM
92Texas, Lubbock County, New Deal — 20073 — New Deal
On South Monroe Avenue south of East Dawson Street, on the right when traveling south.
The Pecos and Northern Texas Railway, part of the Santa Fe system, extended from Plainview to Lubbock in 1909 and established new settlements along the line. Invited to name two of the towns north of Lubbock, Mollie Abernathy suggested . . . Map (db m168511) HM
93Texas, Lubbock County, Posey — 18254 — Immanuel Lutheran Church
On County Highway 3100, 0.1 miles south of U.S. 84, on the right when traveling south.
The Posey Community grew from a 1911 railroad switch on the AT&SF line to a settlement of about 70 in 1941. One of its earliest organizations was the Immanuel Lutheran Church, composed largely of German immigrants lured by railroad advertising and . . . Map (db m168600) HM
94Texas, Lubbock County, Ransom Canyon — 4202 — Ransom Canyon
On Lake Shore Drive East at West Brookhollow, on the right when traveling east on Lake Shore Drive East.
Spanish explorers crossed this canyon, part of the larger Yellow House Canyon, perhaps as early as the 1540s. Jumano, Apache, and Comanche Indians camped here to take advantage of the canyon's protective walls, fresh water springs, trees, and . . . Map (db m168606) HM
95Texas, Lubbock County, Slaton — Engine 1809
On South 8th Street at West Lubbock Street, on the right when traveling south on South 8th Street.
September 15, 1955 The Santa Fe Railway Company officially dedicated the steam-powered Engine 1809 to the City of Slaton. Presented by W.A.J. Carter, Superintendent of the Slaton Division of Santa Fe, the engine was accepted by Slaton Mayor L.B. . . . Map (db m102020) HM
96Texas, Lubbock County, Slaton — 13240 — Englewood Cemetery
Near North 20th Street at East Woodrow Road, on the right when traveling north.
Representing the Santa Fe Railroad, W.B. Storey, Jr. bought the future townsite of Slaton on April 15, 1911. The railroad's plans included a roundhouse, switch lines, depot and Harvey House, making Slaton a center for area rail transport. Rail . . . Map (db m73587) HM
97Texas, Lubbock County, Slaton — 15841 — Mercy Hospital
On South 19th Street at West Division Street, on the right when traveling south on South 19th Street.
For more than 50 years, Mercy Hospital served the health needs of the Slaton community. In 1927, Msgr. Thomas D. O'Brien, then rector of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, joined with a delegation of Slaton citizens to plan a new hospital. Father O'Brien . . . Map (db m73610) HM
98Texas, Lubbock County, Slaton — 4947 — Slaton
On South 9th Street at West Garza Street, on the left when traveling south on South 9th Street.
The town of Slaton traces its history to the Santa Fe Railroad. O.L. Slaton, a Lubbock businessman and banker, was instrumental in securing the right-of-way for the railroad through this area. When the new town was laid out in 1911, it was named for . . . Map (db m73608) HM
99Texas, Lubbock County, Slaton — 15834 — Slaton Bakery
On South 9th Street at West Garza Street, on the right when traveling south on South 9th Street.
In 1923, Blue Ribbon Bakery and City Bakery, each of which had opened in 1921, consolidated. By 1925, this establishment was known as Slaton Baking Company. In 1943, the Wilson family purchased the business. The Wilson's overcame rationing during . . . Map (db m73606) HM
100Texas, Lubbock County, Slaton — 14011 — Slaton Harvey House
On Railroad Avenue at Texas Avenue, on the left when traveling east on Railroad Avenue.
The city of Slaton has historic ties to the railroad. For decades the site was ranchland until the Santa Fe Railway sought a location for a division point to service trains. The Santa Fe bought the land in April 1911, naming the townsite for . . . Map (db m73588) HM

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Jan. 29, 2023