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Historical Markers and War Memorials in Clarke County, Virginia

 
Clickable Map of Clarke County, Virginia and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Clarke County, VA (72) Fauquier County, VA (109) Frederick County, VA (175) Loudoun County, VA (269) Warren County, VA (43) Berkeley County, WV (102) Jefferson County, WV (340)  ClarkeCounty(72) Clarke County (72)  FauquierCounty(109) Fauquier County (109)  FrederickCounty(175) Frederick County (175)  LoudounCounty(269) Loudoun County (269)  WarrenCounty(43) Warren County (43)  BerkeleyCountyWest Virginia(102) Berkeley County (102)  JeffersonCounty(340) Jefferson County (340)
Adjacent to Clarke County, Virginia
    Fauquier County (109)
    Frederick County (175)
    Loudoun County (269)
    Warren County (43)
    Berkeley County, West Virginia (102)
    Jefferson County, West Virginia (340)
 
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GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Virginia (Clarke County), Arcadia Farm — Battle of Cool SpringSharp Action at the Shenandoah River — 1864 Valley Campaign —
On Castleman Road (Virginia Route 603) at Harry Byrd Highway (Virginia Route 7), on the right when traveling east on Castleman Road.
To draw Union troops from Petersburg to Washington, Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early attacked the capital’s defenses on July 11, 1864. He then withdrew to the Shenandoah Valley, where he had left Gen. John C. Breckinridge’s division to hold the . . . — Map (db m1201) HM
2Virginia (Clarke County), Arcadia Farm — T–9 — Castleman’s Ferry Fight
On Harry Byrd Highway (Virginia Route 7) at North Hill Lane, on the right when traveling east on Harry Byrd Highway.
Three miles North in July 1864, General Jubal Early’s army, returning from his raid on Washington, was attacked by Federal units which forced a passage of the river. On July 18, Colonel Joseph Thoburn led his troops against the Confederates but was . . . — Map (db m138516) HM
3Virginia (Clarke County), Arcadia Farm — T-8 — Colonial Highway
On Harry Byrd Highway (Virginia Route 7) at Quarry Road (Virginia Route 612), on the right when traveling east on Harry Byrd Highway.
This is one of the oldest roads leading from the east to the Shenandoah Valley; It crosses the Blue Ridge at Snicker’s Gap. The ferry right over the Shenandoah River was granted, 1766. Washington used this road many times. Some distance to the east . . . — Map (db m1840) HM
4Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — T-4 — Audley
On Harry Byrd Highway (Virginia Route 7) at Audley Lane, on the right on Harry Byrd Highway. Reported missing.
The house to the north is the home of Nellie Parke Custis, George Washington’s ward, who married his nephew, Major Lawrence Lewis. After her husband’s death in 1839, Nellie Custis Lewis settled here, and here she died in 1852. — Map (db m69004) HM
5Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — T-4 — Audley
On Harry Byrd Highway (Virginia Route 7) at Audley Lane, on the right when traveling west on Harry Byrd Highway.
Warner Washington, a first cousin of George Washington, acquired land in this area in the 1760's. His namesake son established a plantation later known as Audley and built a house just north of here ca. 1796. Lawrence Lewis, George Washington's . . . — Map (db m134605) HM
6Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Bank of Clarke County
On East Main Street (Virginia Route 7B) at North Church Street, on the right when traveling west on East Main Street.
Established in 1881, Bank of Clarke County opened for business at 18 North Church Street in Berryville. On December 2, 1906, the bank moved to this site and has been operating continuously ever since. Bank President Ammashaddi Moore . . . — Map (db m157721) HM
7Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — J-30 — Battle of Berryville
On Westwood Road at West Main Street (Business U.S. 7), on the right when traveling south on Westwood Road.
As it maneuvered against Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early’s Army of the Valley, Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s U.S. Army of the Shenandoah marched south from Halltown, reaching Berryville on 3 Sept. 1864. Finding part of Brig. Gen. George Crook’s corps . . . — Map (db m1781) HM
8Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Battle of Berryville
On West Main Street (Business Virginia Route 7) at Westwood Road (Virginia Route 636), on the right when traveling east on West Main Street.
Battle of Berryville Sept. 3, 1864 Early & Sheridan —— — Map (db m88503) HM
9Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Benjamin Berry1720(?)–1810
On East Main Street (Business Virginia Route 7), on the right.
Benjamin Berry, son of Henry Berry of King George County, settled in what is now Clarke County prior to the Revolution, and in 1798, he procured the formal establishment of the town of Berryville, the town having been platted by him, and consisting . . . — Map (db m1810) HM
10Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Q 3c — BerryvilleClarke County
On West Main Street (Business Virginia Route 7), on the right when traveling east.
The town was laid out in 1798 on land of Benjamin Berry and was first known as Battletown. Here at “Audley” lived Nellie Custis, Washington’s adopted daughter. Here at “Soldiers Rest” lived General Daniel Morgan, who built . . . — Map (db m1788) HM
11Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Q-3 — Berryville
On South Buckmarsh Street (U.S. 340), on the right when traveling south.
Before 1798 Berryville was known as Battletown, a name that perhaps originated from a local tavern famous for its fistfights. The General assembly incorporated the town of Berryville on 15 Jan. 1798. Located at a major crossroads of the Shenandoah . . . — Map (db m1811) HM
12Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — BerryvilleOur County Seat
On East Main Street (Virginia Route 7B) 0.1 miles west of Page Street, on the right when traveling west.
Initially known as "Battletown" for the Saturday night brawls that took place at the local inns, the town of Berryville was officially chartered in 1798 and named for Benjamin Berry, a local businessman. The new town became the county seat when . . . — Map (db m157717) HM
13Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — J-1 — Berryville Wagon Train Raid
On Lord Fairfax Highway (U.S. 340), on the right when traveling south.
Just after dawn on 13 Aug. 1864, Col. John Singleton Mosby and 300 of his 43rd Battalion Partisan Rangers attacked the rear section of Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s 600-vehicle wagon train here. The train, headed for Winchester, carried supplies . . . — Map (db m1785) HM
14Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — J 1a — Buck Marsh Baptist Church
On Lord Fairfax Highway (U.S. 340) at Trapp Hill Road (County Route 729), on the right when traveling south on Lord Fairfax Highway.
Organized near this spot by Wm. and Daniel Fristoe in 1772. Constituted by elders John Marks and John Garrard, the later serving as its pastor. James Ireland served as pastor from 1778–1806 and is buried here. — Map (db m1831) HM
15Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Buck Marsh Fight
On Lord Fairfax Highway (U.S. 340) at Trapp Hill Road (Virginia Route 729) on Lord Fairfax Highway.
Buck Marsh Fight Sept. 13, 1864 Mosby's Attack on Sheridan’s Wagon Trains —— — Map (db m1834) HM
16Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Clarke CountyOur Land is Our Legacy
On East Main Street (Virginia Route 7B) 0.1 miles west of Page Street, on the right when traveling west.
The short story of "Our Land is Our Legacy" begins with Virginia's Tidewater planters migrating to the northern Shenandoah Valley to take advantage of the fertile lands and abundant water. What we now know as Clarke County was primarily colonized . . . — Map (db m157715) HM
17Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — T-15 — Clarke County Courthouse
On Church Street at Academy Street on Church Street.
The year after Clarke County was formed in 1836, construction began on a brick courthouse based on county justice David Meade’s design. The courthouse was remodeled in the Neoclassical style about 1850 when the portico and cupola were added. . . . — Map (db m1296) HM
18Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Fight at Gold’s Farm
On Lord Fairfax Highway (U.S. 340), on the right when traveling south.
Fight at Gold’s Farm Sept. 3, 1864 Mosby & 6th N.Y. Cavalry — Map (db m1816) HM
19Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — T-14 — Harry F. Byrd Sr.
On West Main Street (Business Virginia Route 7), on the right when traveling east. Reported permanently removed.
Harry Flood Byrd Sr. (1887-1966), governor of Virginia (1926-1930) and U.S. senator from Virginia (1933-1965), was a conservative Democrat who led a political machine that directed state politics for four decades. As governor, he instituted . . . — Map (db m123655) HM
20Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — T-14 — Harry F. Byrd Sr.(1887-1966)
On West Main Street (Business Virginia Route 7), on the right when traveling east.
Harry Flood Byrd Sr. (1887-1966), governor of Virginia (1926-1930) and U.S. senator (1933-1965), was a conservative Democrat who led a political organization that directed state politics for four decades. As governor, he reorganized state . . . — Map (db m138398) HM
21Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Historic DistrictsDriving & Walking Tours
On East Main Street (Virginia Route 7B) 0.1 miles west of Page Street, on the right when traveling west.
Clarke County is proud to be home to two historic driving tours. They include all four of our historically designated towns and villages. Combined with the National Register Historic Districts of which they are part, they make up over 38 percent . . . — Map (db m157718) HM
22Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — James IrelandMinister of the Gospel
On Academy Street.
In memory of 1746 James Ireland 1806 Minister of the Gospel Born in Edinburgh, Scotland and converted in Frederick County, Va. Baptized and ordained at Sandy Creek, N.C. Imprisoned at Culpeper, Va. for preaching the gospel organizer of Baptist . . . — Map (db m18636) HM
23Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — J-19 — Josephine City
On Josephine Street near South Church Street, on the right when traveling east. Reported missing.
To improve the lives of former slaves, Ellen McCormick, widow of Edward McCormick of Clermont, established this African American community of 31 one-acre lots early in the 1870s. The lots, laid out on either side of the 16-foot-wide street that . . . — Map (db m1805) HM
24Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — J-19 — Josephine City
On Josephine Street east of South Church Street (Virginia Route 616), on the right when traveling east.
Early in the 1870's African Americans established Josephine City, a community originally composed of 31 one-acre lots lining a 16-foot-wide street. Twenty-four former slaves and free blacks purchased the lots at $100 an acre from Ellen McCormick, . . . — Map (db m85942) HM
25Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Josephine School Community Museum & The African-American Experience
On East Main Street (Virginia Route 7B) 0.1 miles west of Page Street, on the right when traveling west.
Much of Clarke County was literally built by enslaved Africans. The 1840 census revealed 55 percent of the County's population was "colored". Those men, women, and children, whose forebearers came as property came as property of the first . . . — Map (db m157720) HM
26Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — King Wheat, Millwood & The Burwell-Morgan Mill
On East Main Street (Virginia Route 7B) 0.1 miles west of Page Street, on the right when traveling west.
Wheat farming and flour milling were the backbone of the Clarke County economy for more than 150 years. Throughout those years, we were home to at least 60 mills and tiny Clarke County contributed mightily to the Shenandoah Valley's . . . — Map (db m157714) HM
27Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — J-14 — Lee’s Bivouac
On Lord Fairfax Parkway (U.S. 340), on the right when traveling south.
Gen. Robert E. Lee bivouacked near here on 18-19 June 1863, as he began his invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. Part of his Army of Northern Virginia marched north toward Winchester, while Lt. Gen. James Longstreet’s corps camped here with Lee. . . . — Map (db m1786) HM
28Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — J-20 — Long Marsh Run Rural Historic District
On Lord Fairfax Highway (U.S. 340) at Lewisville Road (County Route 641), in the median on Lord Fairfax Highway.
This 16-square-mile scenic landscape illustrates the changing patterns of rural life since the 1730s as shown in its plantations, farms, mills, churches, and African American communities. The first settlers came from various places, including New . . . — Map (db m5595) HM
29Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — J-43 — Lucy Diggs Slowe(4 Jul. 1883 – 21 Oct. 1837)
On Josephine Street east of South Church Street, on the right when traveling east.
Lucy Slowe, educator, was born in Berryville. In 1908, while attending Howard University, she became a founding member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, the first Greek letter organization for African American women, and was elected its first . . . — Map (db m104725) HM
30Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Milton Valley Cemetery
On Josephine Street east of South Church Street, on the right when traveling east.
ORIGINAL STOCKHOLDERS: T.T. Brown, Coon Reed, George Blair, Samuel Robertson, Frank Randolph, Robert Hall, Howard Coxen, London Mitchell, George Tokus, Emanuel Blackburn, Joseph Thornley, Joseph Webb, Edmund Jackson, Thomas Laws Jr., Jerry . . . — Map (db m104756) HM
31Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Stewardship & ConservationA New Century of Commitment
On East Main Street (Virginia Route 7B) 0.1 miles west of Page Street, on the right when traveling west.
Every year, hundreds of acres of land are placed in conservation easement by the citizens of Clarke County (see light green parcels in the map). These citizens are new landowners, second and third generation landowners, and descendants of the . . . — Map (db m157716) HM
32Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — The Schools of Josephine City
Near Josephine Street, on the right.
In 1882, the former slaves and free colored people of this community built the Josephine City School to provide their children with a grade school education. Under the leadership of Rev. Edward Johnson, a new building was completed in 1930 to . . . — Map (db m5513) HM
33Virginia (Clarke County), Berryville — Traveler Was Tethered on This Spot
On North Church Street, on the right.
Traveler was tethered on this spot June 21, 1863, as General Robert E. Lee paused on his march to Gettysburg. He attended services here in Grace Episcopal Church. Tablet placed by Sycamore Society 1986 Replaced by E.V. White Chapter, MOSB and Sons . . . — Map (db m144857) HM
34Virginia (Clarke County), Boyce — B-37 — Blandy Experimental Farm
On John Mosby Highway (U.S. 17 / 50) at Blandy Farm Lane, on the right when traveling east on John Mosby Highway.
In 1926, Graham F. Blandy bequeathed a 712-acre portion of his estate, The Tuleyries, to the University of Virginia to educate “boys farming in the various branches.” Beginning late in the 1920s, the two-story, century-old brick slave . . . — Map (db m1812) HM
35Virginia (Clarke County), Boyce — Z-121 — Clark County / Frederick County
On John Mosby Highway (U.S. 17/50) at Gun Barrel Lane (County Route 644), on the right when traveling west on John Mosby Highway.
(West Facing Side): Clark County Area 171 Square Miles Formed in 1836 from Frederick and added to from Warren. Named for George Rogers Clark, conqueror of the Northwest. Lord Fairfax and General Daniel Morgan, Revolutionary hero, lived . . . — Map (db m3483) HM
36Virginia (Clarke County), Boyce — Fight at Berry's Ferry
Near John Mosby Highway (U.S. 50), on the right when traveling east.
Fight At Berry's Ferry July 19, 1864 Imboden & Crook —— — Map (db m62661) HM
37Virginia (Clarke County), Boyce — T-3 — Greenway Court
On Lord Fairfax Parkway (U.S. 340) at John Mosby Highway (U.S. 17 / 50), on the right when traveling south on Lord Fairfax Parkway.
Three miles south is Greenway Court, residence of Thomas, Sixth Lord Fairfax, proprietor of the vast Northern Neck Grant, which he inherited. Born in Leeds Castle, England, in 1693, Fairfax settled in Virginia, in 1747, for the rest of his life. He . . . — Map (db m1755) HM
38Virginia (Clarke County), Boyce — T-2 — Old Chapel
On Bishop Meade Road (Virginia Route 255) at Lord Fairfax Highway (U.S. 340), on the left when traveling north on Bishop Meade Road.
Lord Fairfax worshipped here in the “Old Chapel” of colonial Frederick Parish, established 1738. This stone building dates from 1790 and witnessed the early ministry (1810–1885) of Bishop Meade. Governor Edmund Randolph and Col. . . . — Map (db m1852) HM
39Virginia (Clarke County), Boyce — B-4 — Saratoga
On South Greenway Avenue (U.S. 340) at West Main Street (Virginia Route 723), on the right when traveling north on South Greenway Avenue.
A half-mile east, Revolutionary War hero Daniel Morgan began this limestone Georgian mansion in 1779 while on furlough. He named it for the Battle of Saratoga in which he had recently distinguished himself. The house was probably constructed by . . . — Map (db m1813) HM
40Virginia (Clarke County), Boyce — B-2 — The Briars
On Lord Fairfax Highway (U.S. 340) at Pyletown Road (Virginia Route 620), on the right when traveling south on Lord Fairfax Highway.
Two and a half miles to the northwest stands The Briars, as stuccoed stone, two-story, five-bay dwelling that was constructed around 1819 as the home of Dr. Robert Powell Page. His daughter, Mary Francis Page, married John Esten Cooke, noted . . . — Map (db m1815) HM
41Virginia (Clarke County), Boyce — J-21 — Town of Boyce
On South Greenway Avenue (U.S. 340) at Main Street (Virginia Route 723), on the right when traveling north on South Greenway Avenue.
Boyce was established in 1880 at the intersection of the newly constructed Shenandoah Valley Railroad (now Norfolk Southern) and the road between the Shenandoah River and Winchester (formerly the Winchester and Berry's Ferry Turnpike). First known . . . — Map (db m1814) HM
42Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — T-13 — Appalachian Trail and Bears Den
On Harry Byrd Highway (Virginia Route 7), on the right when traveling east.
This 2,100-mile-long hiking path passes through 14 states from Mount Katahdin, Me., to Springer Mountain, Ga., along the ridges of the Appalachian Mountains. Conceived in 1921 by Benton MacKaye, the trail was completed in 1937. It was designated a . . . — Map (db m1207) HM
43Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — Battle of Cool SpringSharp Action at the Shenandoah River — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
On Parker Lane, on the right when traveling north.
To draw Union troops from Petersburg to Washington, Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early attacked the capital’s defenses on July 11, 1864. He then withdrew to the Shenandoah Valley, where he had left Gen. John C. Breckinridge’s division to hold the . . . — Map (db m76626) HM
44Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — Battle of Cool SpringUnion Advance and Confederate Counterattack — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
Near Parker Lane, on the left when traveling north. Reported missing.
(Preface): In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee sent Gen. Jubal A. Early's corps from the Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter's army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early invaded . . . — Map (db m133228) HM
45Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — Z-180 — Clark County / Loudoun County
On Harry Byrd Highway (Route 7) at Blueridge Mountain Road (Virginia Route 601), on the right when traveling west on Harry Byrd Highway. Reported missing.
(east facing side) Clark County. Area 171 Square Miles. Formed in 1836 from Frederick, and added to from Warren. Named for George Rogers Clark, Conqueror of the Northwest. Lord Fairfax and General Daniel Morgan, Revolutionary hero, . . . — Map (db m1394) HM
46Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — Col. George D. Wells Leads the WayBattle of Cool Spring — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
Near Parker Lane south of Alder Lane, on the right when traveling south.
(Preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee detached Gen. Jubal A. Early's corps from the Richmond battlefields and dispatched it to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter's army. After driving Hunter into . . . — Map (db m133227) HM
47Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — Confederate Counterattack and Union RetreatBattle of Cool Spring — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
Near Parker Lane at Alder Lane, on the right when traveling south.
(Preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee detached Gen. Jubal A. Early's corps from the Richmond battlefields and dispatched it to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter's army. After driving Hunter into West . . . — Map (db m133274) HM
48Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — T-10 — Crook and Early
On Harry Byrd Highway (Virginia Route 7) at Blueridge Mountain Road (Virginia Route 601), on the right when traveling west on Harry Byrd Highway. Reported missing.
Early, while passing through this gap on his return from his Washington raid, was attacked by Crook’s cavalry, July 16, 1864. Crook destroyed a few wagons, Early captured a cannon. — Map (db m1204) HM
49Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — T-11 — Forerunner of Wireless Telegraphy
On Harry Byrd Highway (Virginia Route 7) at Blueridge Mountain Road (Virginia Route 601), on the right when traveling west on Harry Byrd Highway. Reported missing.
From nearby Bear's Den Mountain to the Catoctin Ridge, a distance of fourteen miles, Dr. Mahlon Loomis, dentist, sent the first arial wireless signals, 1866-73, using kites flown by copper wires. Loomis received a patent in 1872 and his company was . . . — Map (db m1205) HM
50Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — 1 — Judge Parker's “Retreat” & the Battle of Cool SpringWelcome to Shenandoah University’s River Campus at the Cool Spring Battlefield
On Parker Lane south of Alder Lane, on the left when traveling north.
“I do not remember to have been engaged in a more sharp and obstinate affair.” (Confederate veteran in Gen. Robert E. Rodes’ division) During the Civil War era the 195 acres that comprise the River Campus were part of a . . . — Map (db m133226) HM
51Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — Mt. Airy Fight
On Harry Byrd Highway (Virginia Route 7) at Blueridge Mountain Road (Virginia Route 601), on the right when traveling west on Harry Byrd Highway.
Mt. Airy Fight Sept. 15, 1864 Mosby * U.S. Cavalry — Map (db m1838) WM
52Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — T-17 — The Retreat
On Parker Lane at Harry Byrd Highway (Virginia Route 7), on the right when traveling west on Parker Lane.
One and a half miles north is The Retreat, home to three distinguished generations of the Parker family. Thomas Parker, a general in the War of 1812, constructed this imposing Federal-style house in 1799. Richard Parker, his nephew, was a U.S. . . . — Map (db m75497) HM
53Virginia (Clarke County), Longwood — Thoburn’s RescueBattle of Cool Spring — Early’s 1864 Attack on Washington —
Near Parker Lane at Alder Lane, on the left when traveling north.
We “fired ninety rounds at the enemy… across the river.” —Lt. Jacob H. Lamb, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery. Across the Shenandoah River from where you stand, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Rodes's division . . . — Map (db m133310) HM
54Virginia (Clarke County), Millwood — B-23 — Ashby’s Gap
On John Mosby Highway (U.S. 50), on the right when traveling west.
Ashby’s Gap was named in honor of John Ashby, a leader among local pioneers and reputedly the first person to haul a hogshead of tobacco through this gap. Part of the house standing just to the south may have been erected in the 1740s by Thomas . . . — Map (db m1333) HM
55Virginia (Clarke County), Millwood — T-1 — Carter Hall
On Bishop Meade Highway (Virginia Route 255) at Carter Hall Lane, on the right when traveling north on Bishop Meade Highway.
Col. Nathaniel Burwell, great-grandson of Robert "King" Carter, constructed Carter Hall in the mid-1790s after moving here from Tidewater Virginia. Edmund Randolph Governor of Virginia, U.S. Attorney General, and U.S. Secretary of State, died here . . . — Map (db m72942) HM
56Virginia (Clarke County), Millwood — Z-120 — Clark County / Fauquier County
On John Mosby Highway (U.S. 50), on the right when traveling east.
(east-facing side) Clark County. Area 171 square miles • Formed in 1836 from Frederick and added to from Warren. Named for George Rogers Clark, conqueror of the northwest. Lord Fairfax and General Daniel Morgan, revolutionary hero, . . . — Map (db m1451) HM
57Virginia (Clarke County), Millwood — B-38 — Greenway Historic District
On John Mosby Highway (U.S. 17 / 50) at Bishop Meade Road (Virginia Route 255), on the right when traveling west on John Mosby Highway.
This 30-square-mile scenic landscape illustrates the evolution of a unique rural community. Unlike the rest of the Shenandoah Valley, where mostly Scots-Irish and German immigrants settled on small farms, Virginia Tidewater gentry occupied most of . . . — Map (db m1848) HM
58Virginia (Clarke County), Millwood — T-12 — Long Branch
On Long Branch Lane at Nelson Road (County Route 626) on Long Branch Lane.
This Classical Revival mansion built for Robert Carter Burwell is one of the few remaining residential works in which B. Henry Latrobe, father of the American architectural profession, played a role in design. Latrobe offered suggestions to Burwell . . . — Map (db m1817) HM
59Virginia (Clarke County), Millwood — T-16 — Millwood
On Millwood Road / Old Route 50 (Virginia Route 723) at Bishop Meade Road (Virginia Route 255), on the right when traveling west on Millwood Road / Old Route 50.
This village developed around two late-18th-century gristmills and Nathaniel Burwell’s Carter Hall plantation, one of the preeminent estates in the area. The Burwell-Morgan Mill in the center of the village was a commercial gristmill, while the . . . — Map (db m1850) HM
60Virginia (Clarke County), Millwood — Mt. Carmel Fight
On John Mosby Highway (U.S. 17/50) at Mt. Carmel Road (County Route 606), on the right when traveling west on John Mosby Highway.
Mt. Carmel Fight Feb. 19, 1865 Mosby & U.S. Cavalry —— — Map (db m153202) HM
61Virginia (Clarke County), Millwood — B-7 — Signal Station
On John Mosby Highway (U.S. 50). Reported missing.
On the hilltop to the south stood an important signal station used by both armies, 1861-1865. — Map (db m1398) HM
62Virginia (Clarke County), Millwood — T-6 — The Burwell-Morgan Mill
On Millwood Road (Virginia Route 723) at Tannery Lane, on the left when traveling east on Millwood Road.
This grist mill, built in 1782-85 by General Daniel Morgan of Saratoga and Colonel Nathaniel Burwell of Carter Hall, was in continuous operation until 1943. Now owned by the Clarke County Historical Association. — Map (db m1637) HM
63Virginia (Clarke County), Millwood — Vinyard Fight
On Millwood Road / Old Route 50 (Route 723), on the right when traveling west.
Vinyard Fight Gold’s Farm Dec. 16, 1864 Mosby & US Cavalry —— — Map (db m1819) HM
64Virginia (Clarke County), Webbtown — Col. Morgan's Lane
Near Parshall Lane (County Route 608) at Hill and Dale Lane, on the right when traveling south.
Col. Morgan's Lane Aug. 19, 1864 Mosby's Attack on Custer's House Burners. No Prisoners — Map (db m4603) HM
65Virginia (Clarke County), White Post — 1750 A.D.
On White Post Road at Berry’s Ferry Road, in the median on White Post Road.
This post was originally placed here by George Washington under the direction of Lord Fairfax. It was erected in 1750 as a guidepost to direct strangers and travelers on the Old Dutch Wagon Road to Greenway Court, the home of Lord Fairfax. — Map (db m1759) HM
66Virginia (Clarke County), White Post — Z-123 — Clark County / Frederick County
On Front Royal Pike (U.S. 522) at Lord Fairfax Highway (U.S. 340), on the right when traveling south on Front Royal Pike.
(North Facing Side): Clark County Area 171 Square Miles Formed in 1836 from Frederick and added to from Warren. Named for George Rogers Clark, conqueror of the Northwest. Lord Fairfax and General Daniel Morgan, Revolutionary hero, lived . . . — Map (db m3481) HM
67Virginia (Clarke County), White Post — J-18 — Double Tollgate
On Stonewall Jackson Highway (U.S. 522) at Lord Fairfax Parkway (Route 340) on Stonewall Jackson Highway.
Early in the 19th century, three important roads crossed here: Nineveh Turnpike leading to Front Royal, Winchester Turnpike leading to the north, and Newton Turnpike connecting Stephens City and the Shenandoah River via the Winchester and Berrys . . . — Map (db m1751) HM
68Virginia (Clarke County), White Post — Double Tollgate Fight
On Lord Fairfax Highway (U.S. 340) at Highland Corners Road, on the right when traveling east on Lord Fairfax Highway.
Double Tollgate Fight Aug. 11, 1864 Imboden & U.S. Cavalry —— — Map (db m3484) HM
69Virginia (Clarke County), White Post — Greenway Court
Near White Post Road (Virginia Route 658) 0.7 miles from Carters Line Road (Virginia Route 627), on the right when traveling south.
Greenway Court Has Been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses National Significance in Commemorating the History of the United States of America 1980 Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service United States . . . — Map (db m70247) HM
70Virginia (Clarke County), White Post — T-7 — White Post
On Lord Fairfax Parkway (U.S. 340) at White Post Road, on the right on Lord Fairfax Parkway.
The crossroads village of White Post grew up around the white-painted marker that Lord Fairfax had erected in the 1760s to point the way to Greenway Court (south), the nearby estate from which he managed his vast proprietary holdings including . . . — Map (db m1757) HM
71Virginia (Clarke County), Wickliffe — Battle of Cool Spring
On Castleman Road (County Route 603), on the right when traveling north.
Battle of Cool Spring July 18, 1864 Early & Crook — Map (db m4601) WM
72Virginia (Clarke County), Wickliffe — Wickliffe ChurchClarke Episcopal Parish
On Wickliffe Road (County Route 608), on the right when traveling north.
1819 Original stone building 1846 Present brick building 1919 Chapel of Grace Church Annual homecoming service second Sunday in August — Map (db m19067) HM
 
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Mar. 7, 2021