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Historical Markers and War Memorials in Jefferson County, West Virginia

 
Clickable Map of Jefferson County, West Virginia and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Jefferson County, WV (340) Berkeley County, WV (102) Washington County, MD (830) Clarke County, VA (72) Frederick County, VA (175) Loudoun County, VA (252)  JeffersonCounty(340) Jefferson County (340)  BerkeleyCounty(102) Berkeley County (102)  WashingtonCountyMaryland(830) Washington County (830)  ClarkeCountyVirginia(72) Clarke County (72)  FrederickCounty(175) Frederick County (175)  LoudounCounty(252) Loudoun County (252)
Adjacent to Jefferson County, West Virginia
    Berkeley County (102)
    Washington County, Maryland (830)
    Clarke County, Virginia (72)
    Frederick County, Virginia (175)
    Loudoun County, Virginia (252)
 
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GEOGRAPHIC SORT
101West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — John Brown Scaffold
Within these grounds a short distance east of this marker is the site of the scaffold on which John Brown, leader of the Harpers Ferry raid, was executed December the Second, 1859. — Map (db m12603) HM
102West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — John Frederick Blessing
John Blessing was born in Germany and came to the United States and made his home in Baltimore, Maryland. He moved to Charles Town 1853 and purchased a large brick building on the corner of Charles and Washington Streets (Now known as the Shugart . . . — Map (db m132445) HM
103West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — John Thomas Marker — of Star Lodge #1, Charles Town
Erected by Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of West Virginia, Free and Accepted Masons, Incorporated In tribute to John Thomas Marker of Star Lodge #1, Charles Town First Most Worshipful Grand Master 1881 The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of . . . — Map (db m10645) HM
104West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — John Yates
Jefferson County, Virginia placed this stone originally in a schoolhouse near Shepherdstown as a tribute to · · John Yates · · The founder of the Free School System in this county Moved to its present location 1937. [ Lower Marker: . . . — Map (db m41726) HM
105West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — John Yates Beall
Born in 1835 in Jefferson County, he joined the 2nd VA Infantry and was wounded at Bolivar Heights in October 1861. Commissioned acting master, Confederate States Navy, in 1863, he operated as a privateer. In 1864, Beall failed in a plan to free . . . — Map (db m157730) HM
106West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Lock Graveyard Memorial
Lock Graveyard relocated by W.V.D.O.H. from the Flynn Farm on the north side of Harper's Ferry Pike, east of Charles Town, W.V. February 27, 1989 — Map (db m103493) HM
107West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Major James Gibson
Major James Gibson Son of Andrew Gibson and Sarah Hopkins, was born August 10, 1776, at Lancaster, Penna. Came to Winchester, Virginia with his parents in 1779. Commissioned by Governor Cabell in 1807 Captain of Hampshire . . . — Map (db m103494) HM WM
108West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Martin R. Delany
Free African-American, born 1812 in Charles Town. Died 1885. Ability to read forced family to move to PA in 1822. Studied medicine and attended Harvard in 1850. Published Mystery, first black newspaper west of Allegh. 1843-47, & co-edited . . . — Map (db m12639) HM
109West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Martin Robinson Delany
Erected in tribute to Martin Robinson Delany Born free May 6, 1812 Lawrence and North Streets Charles Town, VA (W VA) Son of Samuel Delay (slave) and Patti Peace Delany (free) grandson of African prince Prince Hall Mason physician, scientist, . . . — Map (db m12646) HM
110West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Martin Robison Delany
Martin Robison Delany was born in Charlestown, Virginia (now Charles Town, West Virginia) on May 6, 1812. His mother, Patti Peace was a free black woman. She married an enslaved man from Berkeley County named Samuel Delany. They had five children . . . — Map (db m132450) HM
111West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — New Central Restaurant
Washington Hall, the building in which this restaurant is located, was destroyed by fire started by Union soldiers in the Civil War. It was restored by the people of Charles Town in 1874. The first floor was used as a market house from the time the . . . — Map (db m2028) HM
112West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Office of Charles Washington — 1738 - 1799 — Founder of Charles Town, WV —
From this one-room office Charles Washington, brother of George Washington, sold lots in the City of Charles Town which he founded in 1786. — Map (db m132451) HM
113West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Old Stone House / Star Lodge No. 1
Old Stone House Star Lodge No. 1 and Queen of the Valley Lodge No. 1558, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, two African-American fraternal organizations, bought Old Stone House in 1885. Star Lodge sole owner since 1927. One of oldest extant . . . — Map (db m24678) HM
114West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Rutherford House — “Go in!” — 1864 Valley Campaign —
The Federal offensive in the Shenandoah Valley began in May 1864 faltered in the summer with Confederate victories and Gen. Jubal A. Early's Washington Raid in July. Union General Philip H. Sheridan took command in August, defeated Early . . . — Map (db m41661) HM
115West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Samuel Washington House
Samuel Washington was the brother of George Washington, first President of the United States. Born in 1734, Samuel Washington served as Justice of the Peace, County Magistrate, County Sheriff, and parish vestryman in Stafford County, Virginia. . . . — Map (db m132449) HM
116West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Sergeant Littleton Tazewell Cordell
Serg't Littleton Tazewell Cordell Mar. 22. 1882 - Oct. 23. 1918. 110th. Bat. Mach. Gun Co. 29th. Div. Blue & Gray. Killed in Action at Battle of Etraye Ridge, Argonne Forest. France. "In life loved, in death remembered" By . . . — Map (db m103573) WM
117West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Site of the Execution of John Brown
Site of the execution on Dec. 2, 1859, of John Brown, leader of the raid at Harper’s Ferry. — Map (db m62250) HM
118West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — The Confederate Dead
Erected to the memory of the Confederate Dead April 26, 1871 by the Lee Memorial Association of Jefferson County ——————— There's grandeur in graves, there's glory in gloom For out of . . . — Map (db m103464) WM
119West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — The First School for "Colored" in Jefferson County
On these grounds stood the first school for "colored" in Jefferson County. In 1867, the Freedmen's Bureau established this school at the home of Achilles Dixon, a blacksmith. Its first teachers were Annie Dudley and E.H. Oliver. It remained a school . . . — Map (db m132446) HM
120West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — The Flagg House
The Flagg House 323 East Washington Street has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior circa 1820 — Map (db m157735) HM
121West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — The James H. Webb House
This stone house represents one of the earliest stone structures built and owned by free Blacks in Charles Town. It was completed in 1830 by James H. Webb. Located on what was originally known as the "The Old Highway", travelers journeying from . . . — Map (db m132443) HM
122West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — The Stribling House — circa 1840
Union General Philip Sheridan used this home as his headquarters during the Civil War. On the 17th of September, 1862 Sheridan met Gen. U.S. Grant here to plan the 1864 Shenandoah Valley Campaign. — Map (db m41725) HM
123West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — The Trial of John Brown — Jefferson County Courthhouse — Prelude to War —
One of the most famous trials in American history was held in this building in 1859, when John Brown and his followers faced charges of treason against Virginia, inciting slaves to rebel, and murder. Judge Richard Parker presided. The trial began . . . — Map (db m103446) HM
124West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Thomas Green House
Born in November 1820, in Fredericksburg, Virginia, Thomas Green relocated to Charles Town where he began practicing law in 1843. Later, he became a judge and the Mayor of Charles Town. When Judge Brown's selected legal counsel did not appear in . . . — Map (db m132447) HM
125West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Two Treason Trials
Jefferson County's Most Famous Trial In the room immediately behind this wall, the abolitionist John Brown and five of his raiders were tried for treason against the state of Virginia, murder and inciting slaves to rebel. Brown had led 21 men . . . — Map (db m21767) HM
126West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Williams House
The Williams House was built between 1900 and 1914 by the Blum family as their private residence. After moving to Charles Town, Dr. Leah Mildred Williams, a female physician, purchased the home in 1954. Dr. Williams began her family medical practice . . . — Map (db m103643) HM
127West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Zion Episcopal Churchyard — Notable Occupants
The present church, the fourth on this site, was completed in 1851. Federal troops occupied it during the Civil War and severely damaged it. The churchyard contains the graves of many Washington family descents. They are buried near the eastern . . . — Map (db m41675) HM
128West Virginia (Jefferson County), Duffields — Duffields B&O Railroad Station
This structure was erected in 1839 by landowner Richard Duffield, in cooperation with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. It is the oldest surviving purpose-built freight/passenger rail station in the United States, and is listed on the National . . . — Map (db m157741) HM
129West Virginia (Jefferson County), Duffields — Duffields Depot Raid — Mosby Strikes the B&O — 1864 Valley Campaign —
The Federal offensive in the Shenandoah Valley begun in May 1864 faltered in the summer with Confederate victories and Gen. Jubal A. Early's Washington Raid in July. Union Gen. Philip H. Sheridan took command in August, defeated Early at . . . — Map (db m58494) HM
130West Virginia (Jefferson County), Duffields — General William Darke
Within these grounds is the home of General William Darke (1736-1801), who served as officer in American Revolution and in St. Clair's 1791 expedition against Miami Indians in Ohio. He served as delegate to the Virginia Convention called 1788 to . . . — Map (db m5347) HM
131West Virginia (Jefferson County), Duffields — General William Darke — (1736-1801)
In this community resided William Darke, soldier-statesman, who began his career of selfless service to our nation in the French and Indian Wars. In 1777, he was captured at Germantown, Pa., remaining imprisoned aboard ship in New York harbor for . . . — Map (db m158805) HM
132West Virginia (Jefferson County), Franklintown — West Virginia / Virginia
South Facing Side: West Virginia (Jefferson County). “The Mountain State”—western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia until June 20, 1863. Settled by the Germans and Scotch-Irish. It became a line of defense between the . . . — Map (db m1783) HM
133West Virginia (Jefferson County), Halltown — "Beallair"
Colonel Lewis Washington, who lived here, was one of the hostages captured by John Brown in 1859 in his raid on Harpers Ferry. When captured, Brown wore a sword, once owned by George Washington, taken from this home. (1 Mi. N.). — Map (db m12066) HM
134West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — "A journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step." — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
"A journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step." Lao Tzu The stone steps to your left are part of the Appalachian Trail - a 2,200-mile footpath from Georgia to Maine. Climb the steps to some of the most scenic . . . — Map (db m118087)
135West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — "for the deposit of arms"
The Small Arsenal building that stood here from 1806—1861 was one of two warehouses for the nearby United States Armory. A Harpers Ferry visitor in 1821 described both buildings as "arsenals for the deposit of arms manufactured, consisting of . . . — Map (db m99508) HM
136West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — "The War That Ended Slavery" — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
"The War That Ended Slavery" Abolitionist Frederick Douglass, from his 1881 Storer College Commencement speech "I want to free all the negroes in this [slave] state ... if the citizens interfere with me I must only burn . . . — Map (db m143940) HM
137West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — That was the happiest time of my life. — Storer alumna Ruby Reeler — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Female students arriving here at the Cook Hall dormitory were greeted with a welcoming letter that advised them, “Here you will come as a refuge from the strangeness or perplexities of campus life. Here you will fight your battles of . . . — Map (db m70830) HM
138West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — A Government Factory Town
Harpers Ferry owed its existence principally to the United States armory, which began producing small arms here in 1801. At its height, this factory produced more than 10,000 weapons a year and employed 400 workers. The armory affected the everyday . . . — Map (db m18793) HM
139West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — A Government Factory Town No Longer
The destruction of the armory in 1861, followed by four years of Civil War, devastated Harpers Ferry's economy. Attempts at revitalization included a brewery erected here in 1895. When West Virginia enacted prohibition in 1914, the brewery . . . — Map (db m18798) HM
140West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — A Land Divided — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The struggle of today is not altogether for today - it is for a vast future also. Abraham Lincoln You are standing near what was once an international border. During the Civil War, the peak to your left lay within the Union state . . . — Map (db m70826) HM
141West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — A Land Divided — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
You are standing near what was once an international border. During the Civil War, the peak to your left lay within the Union state of Maryland. Loudoun Heights to the right was claimed by the Confederate state of Virginia. Slavery divided the . . . — Map (db m158441) HM
142West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — A Nation's Armory — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
You are standing directly across the street from the main entrance of one of the nation's first military industrial complexes. The U.S. Armory at Harpers Ferry, now covered by an embankment of dirt and rubble, produced the deadliest weapons of its . . . — Map (db m24919) HM
143West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — A Perfect Heap of Ruins — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Standing here on the night of April 18, 1861, you would have seen billowing smoke as fire raged in the armory workshops upstream. Virginia had just seceded from the United States and Virginia militiamen were advancing on the armory. Vastly . . . — Map (db m20520) HM
144West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — 5 — Armory Grounds — Meriwether Lewis at Harpers Ferry —
The United States Armory was the main reason Lewis came to Harpers Ferry. He needed dependable weapons and supplies to succeed on his mission. The quality of the armorers' handiwork would also mean the difference between life and death for Lewis and . . . — Map (db m20481) HM
145West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Armory Paymaster's Residence
Rank has its privileges. The paymaster, second in command at the armory, enjoyed an unobstructed view of the factory grounds and water gap from the substantial brick dwelling erected here about 1800. Soot and noise disrupted the scene with the . . . — Map (db m18664) HM
146West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Armory Workers
Expanding armory operations in the opening decades of the 19th century resulted in overcrowded and unhealthy living conditions for workers. Families shared inadequate, unventilated housing, while single men slept in the workshops. To alleviate the . . . — Map (db m18797) HM
147West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Arsenal Square
Two brick arsenal buildings, which once housed about 100,000 weapons produced at the Harpers Ferry Armory, occupied these grounds. Capture of the firearms was the objective of John Brown’s 1859 raid. Eighteen months after Brown’s attack, the Civil . . . — Map (db m12969) HM
148West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Brackett House
Built in 1858, this house served as the home for the U.S. Armory superintendent's clerk. As an assistant to the superintendent, the clerk's responsibilities included drafting correspondence, filing reports, arranging schedules, and insuring the . . . — Map (db m70779) HM
149West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Branding the B&O — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Passengers in the late 1800s would have instantly recognized this building as the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) Railroad station. Known for their distinctive style and red-and-brown color scheme, the B&O designed their stations to give customers a . . . — Map (db m70782) HM
150West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Burned, Flooded, and Leveled — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The stone and brick walls in front of you show the outline of the Small Arsenal. The actual foundation of this former weapons storehouse lies below ground. In 1959 National Park Service archaeologists first excavated the foundation—100 years . . . — Map (db m143937) HM
151West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Butcher Shop and Boarding House
Factory officials believed a ready supply of meat for the community was "decidedly advantageous to the interests of the armory." As a result, the armory permitted local businessman Philip Coons to erect a large butcher shop and smoke-house, as well . . . — Map (db m18792) HM
152West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — By the aid of these machines... — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Beneath your feet lie the foundations of the Smith and Forging Shop. The largest building in the armory, it reflected changing methods of manufacturing. In the armory's early days, gun making was slow and labor intensive. Armorers worked in small . . . — Map (db m23444) HM
153West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Camp Hill — Discover Harpers Ferry
You are in the Camp Hill area of Harpers Ferry. Explore Camp Hill's history with exhibits in front of the Morrell, Brackett, and Lockwood houses and Mather Training Center. Side trails in Harper Cemetery and in front of Mather Training Center . . . — Map (db m103584) HM
154West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Camp Hill during the Civil War — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
Company A, 22nd New York State Militia, photographed near here during the summer of 1862. Note the house with a cannon in front of it behind the soldiers. It is still here today. In May of 1862, during Stonewall Jackson’s Valley Campaign, Union . . . — Map (db m158424) HM
155West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — No. 1 — Capture of Harpers Ferry — No. 1
September 15, 1862 No. 1On September 10, 1862 General R. E. Lee Commanding the Army of Northern Virginia then at Frederick Md. set three columns in motion to capture Harper’s Ferry. Maj. Gen L. McLaws with his own Division and that of Maj. Gen. . . . — Map (db m2579) HM
156West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — No. 2 — Capture of Harpers Ferry — No. 2
September 15, 1862 No. 2 Maj. Gen. Thomas J. Jackson, with his own Division and those of Maj. Gen. A. P. Hill and R. S. Ewell, left Frederick on the morning of September 10 and passing through Middletown and Boonsboro crossed the Potomac at . . . — Map (db m2728) HM
157West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — No. 3 — Capture of Harpers Ferry — No. 3
September 15, 1862 No. 3 Col. Dixon S. Miles, Second U. S. Infantry, commanded the Union forces at Harpers Ferry. After Gen. White joined from Martinsburg, September 12 and Col. Ford from Maryland Heights on the 13th, Miles had about 14,200 . . . — Map (db m2914) HM
158West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — No. 4 — Capture of Harpers Ferry — No. 4
September 15, 1862 No. 4 In the afternoon of the 14th Jackson's Division advanced its left, seized commanding ground near the Potomac and established Artillery upon it. Hill's Division moved from Halltown obliquely to the right until it struck . . . — Map (db m2921) HM
159West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — No. 5 — Capture of Harpers Ferry — No. 5
September 15, 1862 No. 5 Capture of Harpers Ferry September 15, 1862 No. 5 At daylight, September 15, three Batteries of Jackson's Division delivered a severe fire against the right of the Bolivar Heights defense. Ewell's Batteries opened from . . . — Map (db m2922) HM
160West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Casualties of Time
Over two dozen armory workers' dwellings, ranging from modest frame cottages to substantial stone and brick houses, once fronted Shenandoah and Hamilton streets. The wood houses disappeared around mid-century, victims of fire and demolition. The . . . — Map (db m18799) HM
161West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Casualty of War
German immigrant Frederick Roeder was a prosperous baker, the father of seven children, and a recent widower. Roeder was also about to die. The Fourth of July was normally a day of celebration, but not this year - not 1861. In March Roeder buried . . . — Map (db m99425) HM WM
162West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Chimney
The 90-foot chimney that once stood here towered over the Smith and Forging Shop, dominating the scenery from 1846 until it was torn down in the 1890s. — Map (db m143946) HM
163West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Church and School
The school and mission work are inseparably interwoven with each other. Storer teacher - Kate J. Anthony The Curtis Memorial Freewill Baptist Church served as a spiritual anchor in the lives of both the students and the teachers of . . . — Map (db m70814) HM
164West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Cotton Mill
Once the largest building on Virginius Island, this 1848 four-story brick structure sported steam heat and gas lighting and boasted the latest machinery for making "yard-wide sheeting and shirting at less than Baltimore prices." The cotton mill . . . — Map (db m18812) HM
165West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Daring Escapes — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The boat ramp in front of you was the site of two daring escapes in the Battle of Harpers Ferry. Under the cover of darkness, 1,400 Union cavalrymen fled on horseback down the ramp, crossing a pontoon bridge into Maryland on September 14, 1862. . . . — Map (db m158288) HM
166West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Early Travel
Situated in a gap of the Blue Ridge Mountains and at the confluence of the Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers, Harpers Ferry, from its beginning, functioned as a natural avenue of transportation. The first mode of travel consisted of a primitive . . . — Map (db m12058) HM
167West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Federal Armory
In an effort to increase the number of small arms for defense of the United States, George Washington established a Federal armory here in 1794. The rivers provided power for the machinery; surrounding mountains provided iron ore for gun barrels and . . . — Map (db m12964) HM
168West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Floods
Waterpower built this town, and the power of the water eventually destroyed it. The destruction of the Federal Armory during the Civil War began the town's decline. Many people who had left Harpers Ferry during the war did return, only to be driven . . . — Map (db m12982) HM
169West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Found Underground
The ground around you hides the remains of the U.S. Armory at Harpers Ferry. Beneath the surface archeologists discovered walls, floors, pipes, and the base of a massive 90-foot chimney. As the team slowly and painstakingly excavated small pits . . . — Map (db m21124) HM
170West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Foundations of Freedom — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Harpers Ferry, including Anthony Hall (to your left), played host to large and small scenes in the epic human struggle for freedom and equality. In this building, the superintendent of the national armory contemplated how to strengthen the . . . — Map (db m70797) HM
171West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Foundations of Freedom
Harpers Ferry, including Anthony Hall (behind you to the right), played host to large and small scenes in the epic human struggle for freedom and equality. In this building, the superintendent of the national armory contemplated how to . . . — Map (db m70821) HM
172West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Foundations of Freedom — Civil War Camp to College Campus — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Harpers Ferry, including Anthony Hall (to your left), played host to large and small scenes in the epic human struggle for freedom and equality. In this building, Civil War generals planned their next attack. In the fields around you, Union and . . . — Map (db m158638) HM
173West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Harper Cemetery
Passing through this region in 1747, Robert Harper — a Pennsylvania architect contracted to build a Quaker church in the Shenandoah Valley — was so impressed by the beauty of this place and the water-power potential of the Potomac and . . . — Map (db m10203) HM
174West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Harper House
From this vantage point, a succession of early residents watched Harpers Ferry grow from a tiny village into a thriving industrial community. In 1775, town founder Robert Harper chose this hillside for his family home because it lay safely . . . — Map (db m18753) HM
175West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — 7 — Harper House Tavern — Meriwether Lewis at Harpers Ferry
The Harpers House was near the end of a 20-year run as the only tavern in Harpers Ferry when Lewis arrived. Thomas Jefferson may have been among the first guests to stay here in 1783. If Lewis rented a room in 1803, he was among the last travelers . . . — Map (db m18754) HM
176West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Harper House: The Mansion on the Hill — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
From this vantage point, early residents watched Harpers Ferry grow from a tiny village into a thriving industrial community. In 1775, town founder Robert Harper chose this hillside for his home. The home was completed in 1782. . . . — Map (db m148945) HM
177West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Harpers Ferry / John Brown’s Fort
(West Facing Side): Harpers Ferry Named for Robert Harper, who settled here in 1747 and operated ferry. Site purchased for Federal arsenal and armory in 1796. John Hall first used interchangeable gun parts here. Travel route thru Blue . . . — Map (db m82777) HM
178West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Harpers Ferry History — Hayward Shepard — Another Perspective
Heyward Shepard On October 17, 1859, abolitionist John Brown attacked Harpers Ferry to launch a war against slavery, Heyward Shepard, a free African American railroad baggage master, was shot and killed by Brown’s men shortly after midnight. . . . — Map (db m158470) HM
179West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Head Gates and Inner Basin
These brick-lined archways, or "head gates," built around 1850, once controlled much of the island's waterpower. From here, a "wing dam" extended across the Shenandoah River, funneling water through the arches and into the inner basin. A gate at the . . . — Map (db m18949) HM
180West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Heads versus Hands
A national controversy regarding the education of African American students played out in the building before you. Throughout its history, Storer College faced great difficulty attracting funding. Most white benefactors favored trade school . . . — Map (db m70807) HM
181West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Heyward Shepherd
On the night of October 16, 1859, Heyward Shepherd, an industrious and respected Colored freeman, was mortally wounded by John Brown's raiders in pursuance of his duties as an employee of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company. He became the first . . . — Map (db m126128) HM
182West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — High Street in 1886
(Photo of High Street in 1886)Map (db m18787) HM
183West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — 6 — Home of Joseph Perkins — Armory Superintendent — Meriwether Lewis at Harpers Ferry —
Armory Superintendent Joseph Perkins lived in a converted warehouse on this spot from 1801-1806. The day Lewis arrived, March 16, 1803, he hand-delivered a letter from the Secretary of War directing Perkins to provide "arms & iron work... with the . . . — Map (db m18804) HM
184West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — 1 — Home of Samuel Annin — Armory Paymaster — Meriwether Lewis at Harpers Ferry —
The U.S. Armory Paymaster's house stood here. Completed in 1802 as a home for the armory's senior administrator, this building was probably the best house in town when Meriwether Lewis arrived in 1803. Lewis may have stayed here and he certainly . . . — Map (db m18662) HM
185West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — House Ruins
An island entrepreneur or owner likely resided in this 2 1/2-story house which once stood on this foundation. Owners and workers both resided on the island. Other dwellings included four large 2-story structures, five 2-story brick tenements, and . . . — Map (db m18951) HM
186West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Island Access
Bridges spanning the canal, like the one to your left, provided access from the island to the mainland for residents and factory workers. During floods, they were paths to safety. To delay departure could spell disaster, as in 1870, when swiftly . . . — Map (db m18987) HM
187West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Island Mills
Sounds of turning mill wheels and workers filling bags with freshly ground flour once filled the air here. The foundation of Island Mills, one of the earliest (1824) industries on the island, lies before you. Each fall the railroad brought wheat . . . — Map (db m18983) HM
188West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Jefferson County / State of Maryland
Jefferson County. Formed in 1801 from Berkeley. Named for Thomas Jefferson. Home of Generals Gates, Darke, and Charles Lee. Here four companies of Washington's men organized. Shepherdstown was strongly urged as the seat of the National . . . — Map (db m167196) HM
189West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Jefferson Rock
"On your right comes up the Shenandoah, having ranged along the foot of the mountain a hundred miles to seek a vent. On your left approaches the Patowmac [Potomac], in quest of a passage also. In the moment of their junction they rush together . . . — Map (db m10662) HM
190West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — 8 — Jefferson Rock — Meriwether Lewis at Harpers Ferry —
Twenty years before Lewis came to town, his mentor, Thomas Jefferson, wrote about the view from this rock. Jefferson's comments on the landscape were published in Notes on the State of Virginia. That book provided a model for Lewis as he . . . — Map (db m18791) HM
191West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — John Brown
That this nation might have a new birth of freedom, That slavery should be removed forever from American soil. John Brown and his 21 men gave their lives. To commemorate their heroism, this tablet is placed on this . . . — Map (db m99510) HM WM
192West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — John Brown
Here John Brown aimed at human slavery a blow that woke a guilty nation. With him fought seven slaves and sons of slaves. Over his crucified corpse marched 200,000 black soldiers and 4,000,000 freedmen singing “John Brown’s body lies . . . — Map (db m158453) HM
193West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — John Brown Fort
Here is a building with a curious past. Since its construction in 1848, it has been vandalized, dismantled, and moved four times - all because of its fame as John Brown's stronghold. The Fort's "Movements" 1848 Built as fire-engine house for . . . — Map (db m4420) HM
194West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — John Brown Monument
Commemorated here is the original location of the "John Brown Fort"--the Federal Armory's fire engine house where abolitionist John Brown and his raiders were captured by the U.S. Marines on October 18, 1859. If you look to the south, you will see . . . — Map (db m10900) HM
195West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — John Brown's Last Stand — Harpers Ferry National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
You are in the line of fire. The stone marker in front of you identifies the original site of the armory fire engine house - now known as John Brown's Fort. Barricaded inside the fort, abolitionist John Brown and his men held off local militia and . . . — Map (db m23413) HM
196West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Jonathan Child House
Jonathan and Emily Child owned the house that once stood on this foundation. Along with partner John McCreight, Child bought Virginius Island from Abraham Herr after the Civil War and moved here with his family in 1867. Three years later, on . . . — Map (db m18982) HM
197West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Large Arsenal
Serious problems plagued the weapons stored in this two-story structure built in 1799. Floods and high humidity posed constant threats. Sparks from wood-burning locomotives presented a fire hazard. Inadequate storage space caused overcrowding and . . . — Map (db m18691) HM
198West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — 3 — Large Arsenal Foundation — Meriwether Lewis at Harpers Ferry —
Completed in 1800, the 2 1/2-story, brick arsenal building stored weapons made for the security and survival of a young United States of America. Lewis procured 15 rifles from this stockpile. They were the first and most essential weapons his . . . — Map (db m18752) HM
199West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Lewis and Clark
Meriwether Lewis arrived March 16, 1803. Oversaw building of collapsible iron framed, skin-clad boat and acquired supplies, tomahawks, and rifles. Left for Pennsylvania on April 18; returned July 7 to gather materials and left next day for . . . — Map (db m2149) HM
200West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — Lockwood House
With its commanding view of Harpers Ferry and the Potomac River gap, this house has witnessed significant chapters in Harpers Ferry's history. It was built in 1847 as quarters for the U.S. Armory paymaster and later served as headquarters for Union . . . — Map (db m10180) HM

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Mar. 2, 2021