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3 entries match your criteria.  

 
 

Historical Markers in Arch Cape, Oregon

 
Clickable Map of Clatsop County, Oregon and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Clatsop County, OR (61) Columbia County, OR (9) Tillamook County, OR (19) Washington County, OR (2) Pacific County, WA (22) Wahkiakum County, WA (3)  ClatsopCounty(61) Clatsop County (61)  ColumbiaCounty(9) Columbia County (9)  TillamookCounty(19) Tillamook County (19)  WashingtonCounty(2) Washington County (2)  PacificCountyWashington(22) Pacific County (22)  WahkiakumCounty(3) Wahkiakum County (3)
Astoria is the county seat for Clatsop County
Arch Cape is in Clatsop County
      Clatsop County (61)  
ADJACENT TO CLATSOP COUNTY
      Columbia County (9)  
      Tillamook County (19)  
      Washington County (2)  
      Pacific County, Washington (22)  
      Wahkiakum County, Washington (3)  
 
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1Oregon (Clatsop County), Arch Cape — Arch Cape Carronade
The 1821 naval carronade and the ship's capstan which were located on this site have been moved to the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum for safe keeping from continued weathering and vandalism. The carronade was replaced at this site by an . . . Map (db m177297) HM
2Oregon (Clatsop County), Arch Cape — Cannon Beach
Lt. Neil M. Howison, U.S.N., arrived in the Columbia River 1 July, 1846 on board the 300-ton United States Naval Survey Schooner "Shark" for the purpose of making an investigation of part of the Oregon Country. His report was instrumental in . . . Map (db m113513) HM
3Oregon (Clatsop County), Arch Cape — Cannons on the BeachHistory in the Sand
Cannon Beach was named after a carronade (a short, smoothbore, cast iron naval cannon) found buried in the sand nearby. The cannon broke free of the USS Shark's deck during a shipwreck at the mouth of the Columbia River on September 10, 1846. . . . Map (db m177304) HM
 
 
  
  
 
 
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Sep. 27, 2022