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Historical Markers and War Memorials in Fort Belvoir

 
Clickable Map of Fairfax County, Virginia and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Fairfax County, VA (474) Alexandria Ind. City, VA (297) Arlington County, VA (369) Fairfax Ind. City, VA (39) Falls Church Ind. City, VA (50) Loudoun County, VA (252) Prince William County, VA (502) Washington, DC (1956) Charles County, MD (142) Montgomery County, MD (534) Prince George s County, MD (524)  FairfaxCounty(474) Fairfax County (474)  (297) Alexandria (297)  ArlingtonCounty(369) Arlington County (369)  (39) Fairfax (39)  (50) Falls Church (50)  LoudounCounty(252) Loudoun County (252)  PrinceWilliamCounty(502) Prince William County (502)   D.C.(1956) Washington (1956)  CharlesCountyMaryland(142) Charles County (142)  MontgomeryCounty(534) Montgomery County (534)  PrinceGeorge'sCounty(524) Prince George's County (524)
Fort Belvoir, Virginia and Vicinity
    Fairfax County (474)
    Alexandria (297)
    Arlington County (369)
    Fairfax (39)
    Falls Church (50)
    Loudoun County (252)
    Prince William County (502)
    Washington, D.C. (1956)
    Charles County, Maryland (142)
    Montgomery County, Maryland (534)
    Prince George's County, Maryland (524)
 
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GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — ‘Thermo-Con’ House
In 1948, the Department of Defense worked with Higgins Industries to develop a standard house design to meet the Army’s housing shortage. Higgins Industries designed and mass-produced landing craft during World War II and held the patent for . . . — Map (db m9440) HM
2Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Belvoir Grounds and Potomac View TrailThe Northern Neck Land GrantBelvoir and the Fairfax Family —
(Left Side): The Northern Neck Land Grant A proprietary was land granted to a loyal subject of the King. The Proprietor was permitted to subdivide the land and grant, sell or give it to others. In 1649, King Charles II granted the . . . — Map (db m34927) HM
3Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — E 145 — Alexandria, Mt. Vernon, and Accotink Turnpike
The Virginia General Assembly incorporated the Alexandria, Mt. Vernon, and Accotink Turnpike Company in March 1856. The road passed here on its roughly nine-mile route from Alexandria to Accotink Creek. Its founders included local slaveholders as . . . — Map (db m140922) HM
4Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — E-60 — Belvoir
Belvoir, meaning "beautiful to see," was built about 1741 for William Fairfax, land agent for his cousin Thomas, sixth baron Fairfax of Cameron and Northern Neck proprietor. George Washington was introduced to Belvoir and its gentry culture while in . . . — Map (db m7691) HM
5Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Belvoir
When William Fairfax came to Virginia, he brought many strong English traditions with him. The manor and grounds of Belvoir were laid out similarly to English estates. The brick, Georgian manor was the most sought after and fashionable . . . — Map (db m35073) HM
6Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Dairy
"Prepare your butter for use as in Common & Immerse it in the Liquid & Keep it continually covered & it will keep sweet & good." From the Housekeeping Book of Eleanor Parke Custis Lewis, 1832 Milk products were . . . — Map (db m140944) HM
7Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Facility 1433, Rail Bridge
The Fort Belvoir Military Railroad (FBMRR) was constructed in 1918 when Camp A.A. Humphreys was made a semi-permanent cantonment as the U.S. entered into World War I. The two main objectives for FBMRR were to bring supplies and troops to camp for . . . — Map (db m135217) HM
8Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Facility 2298, Rail Bridge
The Fort Belvoir Military Railroad (FBMRR) was constructed in 1918 when Camp A.A. Humphreys was made a semi-permanent cantonment as the U.S. entered into World War 1. The two main objectives for FBMRR were to bring supplies and troops to camp for . . . — Map (db m128250) HM
9Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Fairfax Family Cemetery
This quarter-mile trail leads to the Fairfax Family Cemetery. It was common practice in the 18th century for residents of estates to be buried in family cemeteries on their property. William Fairfax and his wife Deborah, who died in 1757 and 1747, . . . — Map (db m35136) HM
10Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Fairfax Monument
This monument, erected circa 1924 by the Fairfax family, memorializes William Fairfax, who built Belvoir, and his wife Deborah Clarke, who died in 1757 and 1747, respectively. The monument also honors Thomas and William Henry Fairfax, two of . . . — Map (db m39021) HM
11Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Ferdinando, and the End of the Fairfax Ownership
When George William died in 1787, the land and remains of Belvoir were willed to his nephew, Ferdinando Fairfax, son of his brother Bevan. Ferdinando and his wife Elizabeth lived on the grounds of Belvoir in a house known as the . . . — Map (db m35069) HM
12Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — E-64 — Fort Belvoir
Fort Belvoir is named for the 18th-century plantation that was owned by William Fairfax. The house burned in 1783. The U.S. War Department acquired much of the Belvoir tract in 1912 as a training center and named it Camp A. A. Humphreys for Maj. . . . — Map (db m7689) HM
13Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Fort Belvoir Military Railroad Historic Corridor
The Fort Belvoir Military Railroad (FMBRR) was constructed in 1918 when Camp A.A. Humprheys was made a semi-permanent cantonment as the U.S. entered into World War 1. The two main objectives for the FBMRR were to bring supplies and troops to camp . . . — Map (db m128570) HM
14Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Gardens and Kitchen at Belvoir
Ornamental courtyard gardens were a luxury to create and maintain. The presence of a courtyard garden on an estate indicated the owners were wealthy, educated people. Records show that the garden layout was based upon a garden in Sterling, Scotland. . . . — Map (db m35128) HM
15Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — John J. Kingman Road Crossing
The Fort Belvoir Military Railroad (FBMRR) was constructed in 1918 when Camp A.A. Humphreys was made a semi-permanent cantonment as the U.S. entered into World War 1. The two main objectives for FBMRR were to bring supplies and troops to camp for . . . — Map (db m128251) HM
16Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Life at Belvoir
Belvoir bustled with activities typical of estates during this era. Family members, slaves, and guests were part of daily life at Belvoir. Nearby plantation residents traveled in the same circles, the Fairfaxes, the Washingtons, and . . . — Map (db m35126) HM
17Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Meat House
"The Recipe for smoked Beef is the same as for Hams, except, that in place of 2 lb sugar, take 2 qrts. of Molasses. The Beef must be put in bags also." Eleanor Park Custis Lewis, 1832 This structure was a workplace . . . — Map (db m140939) HM
18Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Necessary
Only members of the gentry used the Necessary, commonly known as an outhouse or privy, and likely only in good weather. Chamber pots were used inside the house in evenings and in cold or inclement weather. Slaves removed, emptied, and cleaned the . . . — Map (db m140945) HM
19Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Non Commissioned Officers’ Service Club
The Office of the Quartermaster General designed this building as an NCO club and the 13th Engineer Regiment constructed it in 1939. The building was constructed with materials appropriated from the post. Prior to this time, a “Hostess . . . — Map (db m9444) HM
20Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Pohick Road Crossing
The Fort Belvoir Military Railroad (FBMRR) was constructed in 1918 when Camp A.A. Humphreys was made a semi-permanent cantonment as the U.S. entered into World War 1. The two main objectives for FBMRR were to bring supplies and troops to camp for . . . — Map (db m128249) HM
21Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Pope-Leighey
The house of moderate cost is not only America's major architectural problem but the problem most difficult for her major architects. - Frank Lloyd Wright, 1936 Frank Lloyd Wright's solution was the Usonian house, a . . . — Map (db m140946) HM
22Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Slavery and Belvoir
Little is known about the slaves and slave life at Belvoir. The manor was constructed at a time when wealthy Virginia farmers used slave labor as a diversified agricultural regime. Slaves also worked as skilled tradesmen in the countryside and in . . . — Map (db m35134) HM
23Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Telegraph Road
The Fort Belvoir Military Railroad (FBMRR) was constructed in 1918 when Camp A.A. Humphreys was made a semi-permanent cantonment as the U.S. entered into World War 1. The two main objectives for FBMRR were to bring supplies and troops to camp for . . . — Map (db m128252) HM
24Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — The Army Comes to Belvoir
By 1910, the area including Belvoir was sold to the US Government. In 1912, the land was transferred to the War Department, designated for use as an Army training site, and was first used in 1915. By 1918, the area was transformed into Camp . . . — Map (db m34947) HM
25Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — The Birth of a River
Nearly 12,000 years ago, the Potomac River was formed as a result of the final glacial episode of the Pleistocene Epoch. At that time, the Potomac River was little more than a tributary of the Susquehanna River. A variety of large animals known as . . . — Map (db m35064) HM
26Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — The Fairfax Family
Belvoir was the home of William Fairfax from 1741 until his death in 1757. William Fairfax hand seven children, four by his marriage to Sarah Walker: Sarah, Ann, Thomas and George William. After Sarah Walker Fairfax's death in 1731, William . . . — Map (db m35070) HM
27Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — The Influence of the Fairfax Family
William Fairfax: • fought in Spain for Queen Anne; • was a member of the Royal Navy; • served as Governor of New Providence, Bahama Islands, • served as an agent to manage, the Northern Neck Proprietary; • was a Vestryman of Pohick . . . — Map (db m35116) HM
28Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — The Neighborhood
Prominent places in the colonial landscape Accotink Village: The town of Accotink was started as a 17th century meeting place. During the colonial period a gristmill and racetrack were located here. Pohick Church: Truro Parish was . . . — Map (db m35118) HM
29Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — The People of Woodlawn
"The planters, to be sure, are rich in lands, and having so many negroes to labor for them live in all the luxury, ease, and ...affluence." Thomas Hill Hubbard, December 29, 1817 Visitors in the early 1800s would have . . . — Map (db m140935) HM
30Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — The Staff Sergeant John D. Linde Visitor Center
Staff Sergeant John D. Linde enlisted in the United States Army Military Police Corps in 1996 because he believed it was his duty to protect and assist those in need. Staff Sergeant Linde was assigned to Fort Belvoir's 212th Military Police . . . — Map (db m140924) HM
31Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — The Woodlawn Historic District
The Woodlawn Cultural Landscape Historic District includes the historic properties Woodlawn, George Washington's Gristmill, the Pope-Leighey House, Woodlawn Baptist Church Cemetery, Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse, Grand View, the Otis Tufton Mason . . . — Map (db m127914) HM
32Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Treasury Building Column Sections
Completed in 1842, the third treasury building now forms the East wing of the present structure at 15th and Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. in Washington, D.C. From 1907 to 1910, the thirty original exterior sandstone columns were replaced by monolithic . . . — Map (db m135216) HM
33Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Warehouse District
Constructed parallel to the installation rail line, the warehouse district represents the supplies and services hub of the installation. Until the improvement of roads between Washington D.C. and the Belvoir Peninsula, the railroad served as the . . . — Map (db m135224) HM
34Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Water Storage Tank 188
Water storage tank 188, constructed in 1918, was the first permanent water storage facility for Camp A.A. Humphreys, home of the Army Engineer School and the World War I-era predecessor to Fort Belvoir. WST188 topped 118 feet making it the oldest . . . — Map (db m140220) HM
35Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — William Fairfax and His Son, George William Fairfax
After schooling in England, George William Fairfax returned to Belvoir to live in 1746, and married Sarah Cary, also known as Sally, in 1748. They had no children. Upon his father William Fairfax's death in 1757, George William inherited . . . — Map (db m35135) HM
36Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Woodlawn1803-1840
"A most beautiful site for a Gentleman's seat..." George Washington, December 1793 Washington presented 2000 acres of his Mount Vernon estate to his nephew Major Lawrence Lewis and Eleanor "Nelly" Parke Custis. . . . — Map (db m140931) HM
37Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Woodlawn
George Washington gave this part of Mount Vernon to his nephew and step-granddaughter, Lawrence and Eleanor Lewis, in 1799. Dr. William Thornton, architect of the U.S. Capitol, designed Woodlawn. Construction of the Federal-style houses occurred . . . — Map (db m140933) HM
38Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Woodlawn Historic Landscapes
In prehistory, nomadic groups hunted and forage here. Under English rule, the land was privatized, with ownership rights granted by royal authority. George Washington bought the Chapel Lands after 1760. He bequeathed this tract and his Dogue Run . . . — Map (db m127990) HM
39Virginia (Fairfax County), Fort Belvoir — Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse
The Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse was built from 1851 – 1853 by members of The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) who in 1846 purchased the 2,000 acre Woodlawn tract as the means to “establish a free-labor colony in a slave . . . — Map (db m127843) HM
 
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