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3 entries match your criteria.  

 
 

Historical Markers in Hartfield, Virginia

 
Clickable Map of Middlesex County, Virginia and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Middlesex County, VA (69) Accomack County, VA (132) Essex County, VA (37) Gloucester County, VA (95) King and Queen County, VA (27) Lancaster County, VA (35) Mathews County, VA (26) Northampton County, VA (57) Richmond County, VA (16)  MiddlesexCounty(69) Middlesex County (69)  AccomackCounty(132) Accomack County (132)  EssexCounty(37) Essex County (37)  GloucesterCounty(95) Gloucester County (95)  KingandQueenCounty(27) King and Queen County (27)  LancasterCounty(35) Lancaster County (35)  MathewsCounty(26) Mathews County (26)  NorthamptonCounty(57) Northampton County (57)  RichmondCounty(16) Richmond County (16)
Saluda is the county seat for Middlesex County
Hartfield is in Middlesex County
      Middlesex County (69)  
ADJACENT TO MIDDLESEX COUNTY
      Accomack County (132)  
      Essex County (37)  
      Gloucester County (95)  
      King and Queen County (27)  
      Lancaster County (35)  
      Mathews County (26)  
      Northampton County (57)  
      Richmond County (16)  
 
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1Virginia (Middlesex County), Hartfield — N-50 — Lower Methodist Church
Built 1717, this was the second lower chapel of Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County. It occupies the site of the first lower chapel of this parish, built before 1661 as the church of Piankatank Parish. Bartholomew Yates was the first minister of . . . Map (db m14109) HM
2Virginia (Middlesex County), Hartfield — OC-43 — Naval Actions on Wilton Creek and the Rappahannock River
In Aug. 1863, Confederate Navy Lt. John Taylor Wood, moving overland with boarding cutters carried on modified wagons and a contingent of 82 men, embarked on an expedition to attack Union ships. At Wilton Creek, Wood and his men repulsed forces from . . . Map (db m74703) HM
3Virginia (Middlesex County), Hartfield — N-77 — Stingray Point
Eight miles east, where the Rappahannock River joins Chesapeake Bay. Near there, in June, 1608, Captain John Smith, the explorer, was hurt by a stingray while fishing in the river. The point took its name from this incident.Map (db m26572) HM
 
 
  
  
 
 
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Oct. 4, 2022