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Historical Markers and War Memorials in Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia

 
Clickable Map of Spotsylvania County, Virginia and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Spotsylvania County, VA (385) Caroline County, VA (60) Culpeper County, VA (139) Fredericksburg Ind. City, VA (393) Hanover County, VA (275) Louisa County, VA (41) Orange County, VA (143) Stafford County, VA (187)  SpotsylvaniaCounty(385) Spotsylvania County (385)  CarolineCounty(60) Caroline County (60)  CulpeperCounty(139) Culpeper County (139)  (393) Fredericksburg (393)  HanoverCounty(275) Hanover County (275)  LouisaCounty(41) Louisa County (41)  OrangeCounty(143) Orange County (143)  StaffordCounty(187) Stafford County (187)
Location of Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia
    Spotsylvania County (385)
    Caroline County (60)
    Culpeper County (139)
    Fredericksburg (393)
    Hanover County (275)
    Louisa County (41)
    Orange County (143)
    Stafford County (187)
 
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GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — "If It Takes All Summer"The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
While the May 12 combat at the Bloody Angle marked the height of the Spotsylvania fighting, it was not the end of it. For nine more days, the Army of the Potomac hovered around the village, looking for opportunities to strike. Finding Lee heavily . . . Map (db m66237) HM
2Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — "The Toughest Fight Yet"The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Artist Alfred R. Waud sketched these Union soldiers under fire here on May 12, 1864. Lee’s counterattacks had driven the Union troops out of the Muleshoe, and here they are shown under cover on the outside of the Confederate trenches. Waud’s . . . Map (db m66225) HM
3Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — A Case of NegligenceSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
"The county jail is now nearly completed, and ready for the reception of ...boarders...Persons taking quarters will be able to resist all attacks of burglars, and as far as burglars are concerned, may enjoy their slumbers in the . . . Map (db m148417) HM
4Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — A Crime of Passion… A Devastating Loss…Spotsylvania Court House National Historic District
In 1924, tragedy stuck the Powell family. Peter Powell's brother, Dr. Robert Powell was shot to death by his neighbor, Charles Kendall, who was arrested and charged with with first degree murder. During the trial, it was revealed that Kendall's . . . Map (db m148379) HM
5Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — A Final JourneySpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
After Lt. General Thomas Johnson "Stonewall" Jackson was wounded at Chancellorsville on May 2nd, 1863, he was taken to an Army hospital near Wilderness Church where his left arm was amputated. Fearing his capture, Lee ordered his move south to . . . Map (db m148413) HM
6Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — A Mass CaptureBattle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
As the first rays of daylight filtered through the rain-drenched woods here on May 12, the men of General George H. Steuart’s brigade heard a commotion up the line, to their left. Moments later, through the shifting mists, they saw a human tidal . . . Map (db m23846) HM
7Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — A Place Called "Courtland"Spotsylvania Court House National Historic District
On April 14, 1839, John Pulliam, local farmer, wrote in his diary......"Agnes and myself went up to Lewis Rawlings to meeting, heard an excellent sermon by Reverend J. Cook, dined at Lewis Rawlings, came home." In 1836, Samuel . . . Map (db m148374) HM
8Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — A Place of Public WorshipChrist Church Episcopal, Est. 1841 — Spotsylvania Court House National Historic District —
On July 20, 1841, John Pulliam, a Vestryman wrote in his diary...... "A warm day, this being the day set aside for the consecration of the church at Spotsylvania Courthouse, about nine o'clock. I started to church in the company of John . . . Map (db m148420) HM
9Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — A Tavern at the New CourthouseSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
In 1838, tragedy struck. The frame Courthouse on the Po River mysteriously burned. Lewis Rawlings and his wife Hannah offered the Justices of Spotsylvania County 10 acres for a new Courthouse. They quickly accepted. Lewis Rawlings was born in . . . Map (db m148389) HM
10Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — A Tavern in the Midst of BattleSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
In 1864, the war returned to the village of Spotsylvania Court House. Sanford's Inn, because of its position at the crossroads, offered a point of observation for General Robert E. Lee, who surveyed the Federal lines from the upper windows facing . . . Map (db m148391) HM
11Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — AftermathThe Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
At 2 a.m. on May 13, 1864, General Lee declared a new line of works a half mile behind you ready, and the Confederate troops in the trenches here quietly withdrew. They had bought the Confederacy what it most needed that day: time. But every . . . Map (db m66230) HM
12Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Amid Shot and ShellSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
Berea Church was initially used as a field hospital during the battles for Spotsylvania Court House as fighting raged on the Brock Road on May 8th. On May 11th, the church became the headquarters of General Jubal Early. On May 13th, the area came . . . Map (db m148418) HM
13Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — An Old Jail...A New HomeSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
"Was summoned as one to go with the Sheriff to take possession of the old clerk's office. The company met at the Court House, all armed and proceeded to our duty. We arrived at the office; forced the door, went in and took out all . . . Map (db m148415) HM
14Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — An Ordinary on the Road to SnellSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
The exact date of the building of the Ordinary on the road from Fredericksburg to Snell is a mystery. The earliest date we can attribute is 1770. It may have existed prior, but unproven by current evidence. In 1799, the property and Ordinary, . . . Map (db m148387) HM
15Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — An Unexpected End to LifeSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
Phillip Anns, the fifth owner of the tract and building, died on August 3, 1873. He left a sum of money to his wife Lydia Anns for the care of their four children. However, Charles M. Garrett married Ann's 16-year-old daughter, Lizzie, and was . . . Map (db m148381) HM
16Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Ashes to AshesChrist Church Episcopal, Est. 1841 — Spotsylvania Court House National Historic District —
Here lies Edgar and Ann Harrison along with the daughters Ellen and Maria. Edgar was born in 1829 in King and Queen, Virginia. He married Ann Marie Smith Goodwin in Fredericksburg in 1851. Edgar was a farmer by occupation. In 1858 with the help . . . Map (db m148422) HM
17Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Attack on the MuleshoeThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Like Lee, General Ulysses S. Grant recognized the Muleshoe’s weakness and made plans to exploit it. On May 12, just after dawn, 20,000 men of General Winfield S. Hancock’s Second Corps stormed across the field in front of you—from left to . . . Map (db m66223) HM
18Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Berea Christian ChurchSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
In 1832 the process of starting a new church began when an organization known as the Reforming Congregation of Disciples chose a group of trustees to select a site. The group chose Berea Christian Church as the new name after Berea, an ancient . . . Map (db m148419) HM
19Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Bloody Angle, Crowded RavineThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Fighting at the Muleshoe Salient focused on a slight turn in the Confederate earthworks, to your right-front, known as the “Bloody Angle.” The Angle occupied a small knoll that commanded adjacent parts of the Confederate line. Whoever . . . Map (db m66224) HM
20Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Booth Hall
To the Glory of God and In loving memory of The Rev. Arthur E. Booth by whose devoted and untiring efforts this Parish House was erectedMap (db m3947) HM
21Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Chancellor'sSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
On December 31, 1855, Joseph Sanford and his wife Agnes sold the tract of land across from the Courthouse and the Spotswood Inn (also owned by Sanford) to Dr. J. Edgar Chancellor. The deed had restrictions; Sanford was to have the use and . . . Map (db m148383) HM
22Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Civil War EarthworksPreservation Message — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
The gentle mounds that meander through Spotsylvania Court House battlefield once looked like the reconstructed earthwork in front of you. The armies built more than 12 miles of trenches here, using whatever tools they could find. Lee's last line, . . . Map (db m10282) HM
23Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Civil War Veterans at rest in Zion's Cemetery[Zion Methodist Church]
This cemetery is the final resting place for six Civil War veterans. Only three of the six have military style headstones. Charles Chewning, 9th VA. Cavalry. Private Chewning received a sabre wound to his left thigh at Second Manassas in . . . Map (db m155962) HM
24Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Confederate CounterattackThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Confederate General Richard S. Ewell responded quickly to Upton’s breakthrough at Dole’s Salient. Wading into the melee, he shouted to the outnumbered defenders: “Don’t run, boys. I will have enough men here in five minutes to eat up every . . . Map (db m66232) HM
25Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Containing the Enemy, Reclaiming the WorksThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
The trenches in front of you belonged to General James H. Lane’s North Carolina brigade. Shortly after dawn, May 12, Union forces captured the East Angle, one-half mile behind you, and bore down on Lane’s men in this part of the Muleshoe Salient. . . . Map (db m66233) HM
26Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Dawn AssaultThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
In the dank, pre-dawn light of May 12, 1864, Confederates huddled along these muddy works could hear the rumble of Union troops coming toward them. Moments later the first of 20,000 Union soldiers poured over the works like a wave, engaging . . . Map (db m66227) HM
27Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Farm to Killing FieldThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
On May 12, 1864, the pastures, potato patches, and crop-lots of Willis Landram's farm would become North America's most notorious killing field. Just before dawn, 20,000 Union soldiers swarmed past the Landram house toward the main Confederate . . . Map (db m10317) HM
28Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Fatal Mistake at the East AngleThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
The sharp turn in the Confederate works here is called the “East Angle.” It marks the apex of the Muleshoe Salient and was one of the most vulnerable points on Lee’s line. Lee fortified the place heavily and placed upwards of 30 cannon . . . Map (db m66226) HM
29Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Fighting for TimeBattle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Throughout May 12, Confederates here waged a battle for critical minutes and hours. When Union troops swarmed over the east face of the Muleshoe Salient before dawn, Robert E. Lee knew instantly that the position – even if regained . . . Map (db m23847) HM
30Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Forming for the AttackThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Had you been here in 1864, you would have been standing at the edge of a field that stretched from here to the Confederate works. Upton's men advanced four abreast in a column up this road. When they reached this point, they silently deployed into a . . . Map (db m169704) HM
31Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Grant's May 18th AttackThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Following the fight for the "Bloody Angle," Lee constructed this new line of works across the base of the Muleshoe. Unwilling to attack the Confederates in their new position, Grant shifted east toward the Fredericksburg Road (modern Route 208). . . . Map (db m10281) HM
32Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Heth’s SalientThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
With the fighting at the Bloody Angle at an impasse, Grant and Lee looked elsewhere for opportunities to attack. Coincidentally, both men turned their attention to Heth’s Salient, here on the eastern face of the Muleshoe. Grant sought a weak point . . . Map (db m66235) HM
33Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — In His Father's FootstepsSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
Samuel Peter Powell was born on January 26, 1880 to James L. Powell, Jr. ad Carrie Elizabeth Jones Powell. He was the oldest of nine children. His father was a surviving Civil War veteran and served as Commonwealth Attorney in Spotsylvania. He . . . Map (db m148377) HM
34Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Joseph Sanford's Inn & TavernSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
Joseph Farmer Sanford was born in 1819, the son of Lawrence Sanford and Apphia Farmer in Stafford County, Virginia. In 1835, he married Agnes I. M. Crawford of Orange, Virginia. His early career was that of the keeper of the U.S. Hotel in . . . Map (db m148390) HM
35Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Laurel HillThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
[The] Federal assaults were not only easily repulsed, but the forces making them were simply slaughtered. Private John Coxe, 2nd South Carolina Infantry Before you lies Laurel Hill, one of the most important but least understood areas . . . Map (db m156386) HM
36Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Laurel Hill TrailFredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Although not as famous as the "Bloody Angle," the fighting at Laurel Hill played an important role in the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. Here the battle began, and here more than 5,000 soldiers suffered or died. The Laurel Hill Trail leads to . . . Map (db m149216) HM
37Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Lee to the Rear!The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
The General's countenance showed that he had despaired and was ready to die rather than see the defeat of his army. Isaac G. Bradwell, 3rd Georgia Infantry In these fields on the morning of May 12, 1864, Gen. Robert E. Lee faced a crisis . . . Map (db m10426) HM
38Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Legend, Lore and FactSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
The famous well at Spotsylvania Courthouse was probably excavate around 1798 at the same time the Tavern and Inn located across the road was established. It dominated the intersection of the Fredericksburg Road, Brock Road and the road to . . . Map (db m148412) HM
39Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Mayhem in the MuleshoeThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Surrounded on all sides by low ridge lines, Neil MccCoull's house sat in the center of the famous Muleshoe Salient. On the night of May 8, 1864, Confederate engineers built the bulging line of earthworks that wrapped around McCoull's farm to the . . . Map (db m10289) HM
40Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Modification, Decay & PreservationSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
Most public buildings rarely survive in their original state. The County jail is no exception. By 1876, County records indicate the cells on the upper floor being used for some other purpose. The jail report stated this use cut off ventilation to . . . Map (db m148416) HM
41Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Pastor's Office[Zion Methodist Church]
Spotsylvania County Post Mistress, Alice Coleman donated this small white building to Zion. It had previously served as the County Post Office. The building was located across the street from today's Pendleton's Hardware Store. It was moved to . . . Map (db m148369) HM
42Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Sadly in Need...Christ Church Episcopal, Est. 1841 — Spotsylvania Court House National Historic District —
The rafters in the interior of the church still reflect the damage from the battle. "The 11th was passed in comparative quiet, with the exception of our usual salutation from the enemy attacks. They made daily practice on our . . . Map (db m148421) HM
43Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Samuel Alsop Jr.Spotsylvania Court House National Historic District
Samuel Alsop Jr., was born in 1776 in Caroline County, the son of Samuel Alsop. He was a plantation owner and planter, slave owner land speculator, and to a limited extend, slave trader. Alsop operated his growing business empire from the area . . . Map (db m148388) HM
44Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Slave Entrance[Zion Methodist Church]
In 19th century America, most people followed strict Biblical teachings. God's fourth Commandment to keep the Sabbath Holy was no exception. On any given Sunday morning it was normal to see small and large churches alike filled to their capacity. . . . Map (db m148368) HM
45Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Spindle HouseThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Many Spotsylvania families lost property during the war, but Sarah Spindle nearly lost her life. The 36-year-old widow and her family had just sat down to breakfast on May 8, 1864, when the popping of rifles announced the presence of hostile . . . Map (db m10253) HM
46Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Spotsylvania Campaign
Upton's Attack About 6 p.m. May 10, 1864 A quarter of a mile beyond this point, their bayonets fixed, Upton's lines broke silence with a wild cheer as they burst from the piney woods across a 200-yard clearing to the Confederate trenches. . . . Map (db m169921) HM
47Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Spotsylvania Court HouseMay 8 to 21, 1864
[Marker is a graphic display with captions:] 1. May 8, 1864 - Warren's Union V Corps supports the Cavalry 2. Sheridan's Union Calvary leads the advance during the evening of May 7-8 2. Fitzhugh Lee's Confederate Cavalry contests . . . Map (db m149215) HM WM
48Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Struggle for the Bloody AngleThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
For 22 hours combat raged on the landscape in front of you. Although the fighting extended for half a mile, the battle focused on (and became identified with) a slight bend in the Confederate lines known thereafter as the Bloody Angle. The . . . Map (db m66228) HM
49Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Stubbs School
The Stubbs School is typical of African-American public schools scattered throughout the county between 1870 and 1952. This modest one-room school opened in the early 1930s. The building lacked electricity and plumbing. Its only heat source was . . . Map (db m3711) HM
50Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — The Confederate EarthworksThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
These modest mounds are all that remain of the Muleshoe Salient’s once-formidable earthworks. Begun by the Confederates on the night of May 8, the works were four feet high, with a two-foot-deep trench. Dirt from the trench was thrown against the . . . Map (db m66229) HM
51Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — The Confederate LineBattle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
The landscape in front of you bears vivid testimony to the nature of fighting here in May 1864. At Spotsylvania, not only did soldiers build stout dirt and log works to protect them from fire in front, but they also built shorter trenches called . . . Map (db m10404) HM
52Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — The Corner StoreSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
In March of 1909, George W. Perry acquired the corner store. George was born in Spotsylvania in 1857. He was the son of John M. Perry and Martha Virginia Chewning. In 1885, he married Martha Thompkins in Richmond. She died two years later and he . . . Map (db m148380) HM
53Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — The Death of SedgwickThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Sedgwick was essentially a soldier. He had never married; the camp was his home, and the members of his staff were his family. He was always spoken of familiarly as “Uncle John,” and the news of his death fell upon his comrades with . . . Map (db m66217) HM
54Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — The Fredericksburg RoadThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
The Fredericksburg Road, on your left, was the Army of the Potomac’s main line of supply during the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. Each day hundreds of wagons lumbered down the road, bringing tons of food, arms, and ammunition to the . . . Map (db m66236) HM
55Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — The Harrison HouseThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Like most Spotsylvania County residents, Edgar W. Harrison little imagined the impact the Civil War would have on his community and his life. Harrison, his wife Ann, and their three young children lived in a story-and-a-half farmhouse set on the . . . Map (db m10424) HM
56Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — The Landram HouseThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
The rubble of two chimneys is all that remains of Willis Landram's modest farmhouse, a building destroyed in the 1864 battle. The 65-year-old Landram, his wife Lucy, and five other family members chiseled a life of bare essentials from 170 acres. . . . Map (db m10325) HM
57Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — The McCoull HouseThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
This was the home of farmer Neil McCoull and his unmarried sisters Mary, Eliza, and Milly. McCoull's farm was typical of those that dotted Spotsylvania County: a few hundred acres that produced a modest income from corn and other grains. Like his . . . Map (db m10290) HM
58Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — The Muleshoe SalientThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
One hundred and fifty yards ahead of you is the Bloody Angle, perhaps the most hallowed site on any Civil War battlefield. The Bloody Angle is a small bend in the Confederate works within the much larger Muleshoe Salient, a huge outward bulge in . . . Map (db m66222) HM
59Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — The Ninth CorpsThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
To support Hancock’s May 12 assault at the East Angle, Grant ordered General Ambrose E. Burnside’s Ninth Corps to attack the Muleshoe Salient here along its eastern face. Shouldering their way through wet woods, Burnside’s men reached this spot . . . Map (db m66234) HM
60Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — The Race for Spotsylvania Court HouseThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
On the 8th of May we had the hardest march of the war….as we neared Spottsylvania the rattling of musketry told us too plainly our day’s trials were not over…. Sergeant James M. Thompson 6th Alabama Infantry After two days of . . . Map (db m66218) HM
61Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Time PassagesSpotsylvania Court House National Historic District
Joseph Sanford, Sr. sold the tavern to Elijah Fisher in 1869 and left the area. A steady stream of owners followed: Jack Shelton (1872), Joseph Bittle (1887), A. B. Rawlings (1890), H. A. Carner (1897), Thomas B. Coleman (1906). A fire in 1909 . . . Map (db m148392) HM
62Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Upton’s AssaultThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
Just before 6 p.m. on May 10, 1864, 5,000 Union soldiers led by Colonel Emory Upton—formed in deep masses rather than traditional battle lines—emerged from the woods ahead of you and dashed across this field. They reached the main . . . Map (db m66231) HM
63Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania Courthouse — Upton’s TrailThe Battle of Spotsylvania Court House — Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —
By the night of May 8, the Confederate army was in firm possession of Spotsylvania Court House. With Lee entrenching, Grant looked for opportunities to attack. Reports from the front indicated that the Confederates were in force on both their left . . . Map (db m66221) HM
 
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