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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Related Historical Markers

The Antietam Campaign: Markers covering the first phases of the 1862 Campaign
 
The Three Markers at Ox Hill Battlefield Park image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, February 16, 2006
The Three Markers at Ox Hill Battlefield Park
SHOWN IN SOURCE-SPECIFIED ORDER
1Virginia (Fairfax County), Fairfax — B-29 — Maryland (Antietam / Sharpsburg) Campaign
Following the Battle of Ox Hill (Chantilly) on 1 Sept. 1862, Gen. Robert E. Lee pondered his options and strategy. Encouraged by Confederate victories and Federal disorganization, Lee acted quickly to continue the offensive. On 3 Sept., Lee's Army . . . — Map (db m111) HM
2Virginia (Fairfax County), Reston — T-37 — Sharpsburg (Antietam) Campaign
Here Lee entered this road from Ox Hill, September 3, 1862, and turned West toward Leesburg. Crossing the Potomac at White's Ford, the army entered Maryland, September 5-6, 1862. — Map (db m1098) HM
3Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — LeesburgFrom Paradise to Peril — Antietam and Gettysburg Campaigns —
“Leesburg! Paradise of the youthful warrior! Land of excellent edibles and beautiful maidens!” — so wrote a Confederate artilleryman in late 1861. A year later, a northern correspondent found Leesburg a weary town full of . . . — Map (db m1544) HM
4Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from the victory at the Second Battle of Manassas General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 1-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m1110) HM
5Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m1220) HM
6Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Mile HillCavalry Clash
On September 1, 1862, Col. Thomas Munford, commander of the Confederate 2nd Virginia Cavalry (163 men), was ordered to Leesburg to destroy a body of Union Cavalry—the locally raised Independent Loudoun Virginia Rangers—who were harassing . . . — Map (db m1219) HM
7Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — F-6 — Sharpsburg (Antietam) Campaign
Near here Stonewall Jackson bivouaced on the march into Maryland, September 4, 1862. — Map (db m986) HM
8Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — F-2 — Potomac Crossings
Here Lee turned east to the Potomac, crossing at White's Ford, September 6, 1862, in his invasion of Maryland. Jubal A. Early, returning from his Washington raid, crossed the river at White’s Ford, July 14, 1864. — Map (db m1609) HM
9Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from the victory at the Second Battle of Manassas General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 1-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m167962) HM
10Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s FerryInvasion or Liberation? — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
The serenity of the Maryland countryside was shattered on September 4-6, 1862, as 35,000 Confederate soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia waded across the Potomac River. Gen. Robert E. Lee, hoping to rally support in the divided state, sent . . . — Map (db m807) HM
11Maryland (Montgomery County), Dawsonville — White’s Ferry12 miles →
An old ferry and ford across the Potomac River often used during the war between the states by Confederate forces under Generals Robert E. Lee, Jubal Early, J.E.B. Stuart and others during campaigns and raids in Maryland. — Map (db m1680) HM
12Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s FordCrossing the Potomac — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
A wing of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia commanded by Gen. James Longstreet, as well as part of Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry, crossed into Maryland just south of here on September 5-6, 1862. Other parts of the 40,000-man force, . . . — Map (db m812) HM
13Maryland (Montgomery County), Martinsburg — White’s Ford
About 2 miles northwest was White’s Ford. This Potomac crossing was used by Gen. R. E. Lee entering Maryland in September, 1862, and Generals J.E.B. Stuart and Jubal A. Early returning to Virginia in 1862 and 1864, respectively. — Map (db m811) HM
14Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Monocacy AqueductToo Tough To Crack — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
Confederate Gen. D. H. Hill’s division crossed the Potomac at Point of Rocks on September 4, 1862, and marched south to clear Union forces from the area. His men breached and drained the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal at several places, burned canal . . . — Map (db m65210) HM
15Maryland (Frederick County), Dickerson — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m4028) HM
16Maryland (Frederick County), Adamstown — Carrollton ManorGreen Corn March — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On Saturday, September 6, 1862, the Army of Northern Virginia was spread along the entire length of Buckeystown Turnpike all the way to Frederick. The soldiers camped in the fields on either side of the road on the evenings of September 5-6, and by . . . — Map (db m152272) HM
17Maryland (Frederick County), Buckeystown — Buckeystown ParkSoldiers’ Shortcake — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On the south end of this park, the road from Urbana to Buckeystown crossed the Monocacy River over a stone bridge. Some of the Confederate troops camped here on September 6, 1862, while some crossed the bridge to bivouac on a knoll overlooking the . . . — Map (db m1737) HM
 
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Mar. 7, 2021