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Education Topic

 
Daniel Pratt Cemetery / George Cooke Marker Side B image, Touch for more information
By Tim Carr, August 1, 2009
Daniel Pratt Cemetery / George Cooke Marker Side B
GEOGRAPHIC SORT WITH USA FIRST
1Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Daniel Pratt Cemetery / George Cooke
(Front): Daniel Pratt CemeteryFinal resting place of early Alabama industrialist Daniel Pratt, 1799-1873, and wife Esther Ticknor Pratt, 1803-1875. He was from New Hampshire and she, Connecticut. Married 1827 at Fortville, Jones County, . . . — Map (db m27957) HM
2Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Sidney LanierMusician - Poet - Patriot - Seer
Beloved teacher of Prattville Academy 1867 • on this site • 1868 whose memory will be forever cherished by people of Prattville, Ala. whom he loved and served — Map (db m70820) HM
3Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Sidney Lanier/Prattville Male and Female Academy Site
Side 1 Sidney Lanier 1842-1881 The poet and musician, born in Macon, Georgia, was Academy principal in 1867-68. He married Mary H. Day of Macon in December 1867. In Prattville, they lived at the Mims Hotel and later in Dr. S.P. . . . — Map (db m70802) HM
4Alabama (Baldwin County), Bay Minette — Judge Harry Toulmin(1766 – 1823)
Born and educated in England, Toulmin became a Unitarian Minister and fled persecution in 1793. In the U.S. he served as President of Transylvania University and Secretary of the State of Kentucky. In 1804 Thomas Jefferson appointed him as the first . . . — Map (db m100850) HM
5Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — Site of Baldwin County's First Courthouse
This foundation is all that remains of Baldwin County’s first courthouse. Authorized in 1820 but not constructed until circa 1833, the two-story brick building contained a jail on the bottom floor with office space on the upper floor. . . . — Map (db m131830) HM
6Alabama (Baldwin County), Fairhope — Marietta Johnson
Marietta Johnson, world leader of the Progressive Education Movement founded the School of Organic Education in 1907. The school, which demonstrated her philosophy, attracted intellectuals and artists. Her work is a reminder of Fairhope’s . . . — Map (db m128888) HM
7Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — Historic Stockton / Old Schoolyard Park
Front: Historic Stockton Modern Stockton is situated on a hill just above the original settlement, which was abandoned around 1840 because of Yellow Fever outbreaks. No verified source for the town name exists. Most likely it was . . . — Map (db m66390) HM
8Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — Public Education in Baldwin County / Little Red Schoolhouse Historic Site
In 1799 the first public school in Alabama was built just north of this site at Boatyard Lake in the Tensaw Community. More than 90 small schools dotted Baldwin County in the early twentieth century. This one room school was built in 1920 by African . . . — Map (db m122669) HM
9Alabama (Baldwin County), Summerdale — Sonora Community / Sonora School and Community Hall
Sonora Community The community of Sonora was named in 1901 by the wife of the first postmaster, G.L. Sharretts. Situated near Red Hill Ford on Baker Branch and the intersection of travel routes between Silverhill, Magnolia Springs, Marlow . . . — Map (db m130878) HM
10Alabama (Barbour County), Blue Springs — Blue Springs School 1920-1969
The Blue Springs School was first established in 1920. The land was donated by Henry H Shepard. The Plans were drawn by the State School architect. The lumber was donated by citizens of the community and prepared at A.S. Knight’s sawmill. Other . . . — Map (db m60680) HM
11Alabama (Barbour County), Clio — Barbour County High School
Established under an Act of the Alabama Legislature in 1907, the school was built entirely by local initiative. It was completed in 1910 and occupied initially in September of that year. Consistently characterized by faculties of dedication and . . . — Map (db m71798) HM
12Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Fendall Hall / Young and DentThe Young - Dent Home
Built between 1856 and 1860 by Edward Brown Young and his wife, Ann Fendall Beall, this was one of the first of the great Italianate style homes constructed in Eufaula. It later became the home of the builders’ daughter, Anna Beall Young, and her . . . — Map (db m33759) HM
13Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Old Negro Cemetery / Fairview Cemetery
Interred on this gently sloping hillside are the remains of many of Eufaula’s early black citizens. Their names are known only to God because the wooden grave markers which located the burials have long since vanished. This burying ground was used . . . — Map (db m27987) HM
14Alabama (Bibb County), Brierfield — Absalom Pratt House
Absalom Pratt built this house 8 miles west of here circa 1835 though a section was constructed earlier. It was moved to this site in 1994 by the Cahaba Trace Commission, restored by the Alabama Historic Ironworks Commission, 1997-98, and dedicated . . . — Map (db m37078) HM
15Alabama (Bibb County), Six Mile — Site of Six Mile Male And Female Academy
Years before 1859, two acres of land were donated for a school by Mr. and Mrs. Good. A two-story wooden structure was built. Among its first teachers were John Alexander, W. J. Peters, R. M. Humphries, and R. H. Pratt. Under Pratt’s leadership the . . . — Map (db m37054) HM
16Alabama (Bibb County), Six Mile — Six Mile Male & Female Academy Site← 300 Yards
Incorporated in 1859 though organized earlier and operated continuously through 1897. First trustees were William P. Thomas, Leroy T. McGuire, Ezekiel C. Smith, Simpson W. Hederick and Pulaski Wallace. This noted center of learning in Bibb County . . . — Map (db m37053) HM
17Alabama (Blount County), Holly Springs — Holly Springs School
Four school sites have been located in this community known as Morton’s Center, Hew Hope, and Poplar Springs now Holly Springs. The first at Morton’s Center was taught in 1882 by George W. Burttram. The first school at New Hope was taught by . . . — Map (db m145410) HM
18Alabama (Blount County), Oneonta — Bailey School1893 - 1951
William M. Bailey (born 1859 in Cherokee Co.; died 1909 in Blount Co.) settled 40 acres on what became Co. Rd 36 to the west and New Home Church Rd to the east in 1893. He brought three small sons from Cherokee Co. after the death of his first wife . . . — Map (db m42599) HM
19Alabama (Bullock County), Aberfoil — Aberfoil SchoolBullock County
Side 1 In 1890, Reverend C. H. Thornton donated 10 acres of land where he organized a church and the first public school for African Americans in the Aberfoil community. The first school structure was a one room log cabin. Rev. . . . — Map (db m153582) HM
20Alabama (Bullock County), Midway — Old Merritt School Midway Community Center
Margaret Elizabeth Merritt of Midway sold two acres for $5 to the state of Alabama in 1921 as a site for an elementary school for African-American children. Built in 1922 with matching Rosenwald funds, the Midway Colored Public School featured oak . . . — Map (db m60910) HM
21Alabama (Bullock County), Union Springs — Sardis Baptist Church, Cemetery, and School
(side 1) Settlers from the Edgefield District, South Carolina, organized the Sardis Baptist Church on June 10, 1837. The first building, a log cabin, was constructed in 1841 after John M. and his wife Amy Youngblood Dozier deeded four and . . . — Map (db m67552) HM
22Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Confederate Park/Greenville City Hall-Site of Public School
Side 1 Confederate Park Confederate Park was created in 1897 as a joint effort of the Father Ryan Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the City of Greenville, with First United Methodist Church providing the Park . . . — Map (db m70749) HM
23Alabama (Calhoun County), Hobson City — Town of Hobson City, Alabama
Front Hobson City is Alabama's first incorporated black city. The area was first known as Mooree Quarter, a black settlement that was part of Oxford, Alabama. After a black man was elected Justice of the Peace in Oxford, one mayor . . . — Map (db m106598) HM
24Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — "The Magnolias"Home of Clarence William Daugette — B. Sc., M. Sc., LL. D. 1873-1942 —
Dean of American College Presidents President of Jacksonville State Normal-State Teachers College 1899-1942 During an Educational Renascence in the South he was in the forefront of the Alabama Educational System President 1st National Bank . . . — Map (db m29922) HM
25Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Jacksonville State University
This Educational Center of Northeast Alabama Traces its Origin to Jacksonville Male Academy 1836 Jacksonville Female Academy 1837 Calhoun College 1871 Calhoun Grange College 1878 State Normal School 1883 State Teachers College 1929 . . . — Map (db m36426) HM
26Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Jacksonville, Alabama“Gem of the Hills”
Life here has long centered on education beginning in 1834 when a one-acre plot of land was reserved for a schoolhouse. Through the years, various institutions of higher learning developed that culminated into present-day Jacksonville State . . . — Map (db m36429) HM
27Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Presidents of Jacksonville State
James G. Ryals, Jr. 1883-1885 J. Harris Chappell 1885-1886 Carleton B. Gibson 1886-1892 J. B. Jarrett 1892-1893 Jacob Forney, IV 1893-1899 Clarence William Daugette 1899-1942 Houston Cole 1942-1971 Ernest Stone 1971-1981 Theron E. . . . — Map (db m36427) HM
28Alabama (Chambers County), Oak Bowery — Oak BowerySettled 1828
Near this site stood the Oak Bowery Female Institute, opened in 1849 under auspices of the Methodist church. Masons established the East Alabama Masonic Institute for Young Men Among Oak Bowery's noteworthy citizens: William J. Samford. Alabama . . . — Map (db m151222) HM
29Alabama (Chambers County), Valley — Fairfax Kindergarten
Built in 1916, the kindergarten was one of five original public buildings in the Fairfax Mill Village. Each mill village had an efficient, attractive, and well kept kindergarten for children ages four to six. LaFayette Lanier, Sr. was the . . . — Map (db m71634) HM
30Alabama (Chambers County), Valley — Lanier High School
Side 1 The school was located at three different sites on Cherry Drive. Its beginning was in The Blue Hall Building adjacent to Goodsell Methodist Church. Later it was moved to the Dallas/Jackson Home and became the Jackson Hill School. . . . — Map (db m71638) HM
31Alabama (Cherokee County), Gaylesville — David Hartline
David was born 4 of 12 children, served in combat in Vietnam, was wounded and is a highly decorated war veteran. David is a best selling author, a veteran advocate, and State Commander of the American Legion. He is a former college instructor and . . . — Map (db m114742) HM
32Alabama (Cherokee County), Gaylesville — Gaylesville
Post Office est. in 1836. During the Civil War, the main body of U.S. General William Tecumseh Sherman's Army camped around the town in October 1864. A private home served as his headquarters. Despite pleas from citizens, his troops burned the mill . . . — Map (db m114532) HM
33Alabama (Chilton County), Clanton — Chilton County Training School 1924-1969
The Chilton County Training School (CCTS) was the only facility in the county that provided a secondary education for black boys and girls until the mid-1960s. In 1924 black landowners donated five acres for the school to the Board of Education who . . . — Map (db m54656) HM
34Alabama (Chilton County), Marbury — Memorial Hall1904 – 1924
On this site stood "Memorial Hall," the two story, log and shingle administrative and social center of the Alabama Confederate Soldiers' Home. Construction was partially financed by individuals from across the state who purchased "Memorial Logs" for . . . — Map (db m129410) HM
35Alabama (Choctaw County), Silas — Silas Elementary SchoolChoctaw County
The Choctaw County Board of Education built Silas Elementary School in 1936 with support from the Alabama State Department of Education. Students attended the school from 1936-2005. After nearly 70 years as a school, the building took on a new . . . — Map (db m110975) HM
36Alabama (Clarke County), Jackson — City of Jackson
Side 1 First home of Creek and Choctaw Indians, Jackson’s first pioneer settlers arrived about 1800. The little village was first called Republicville, then Pine Level, before its incorporation by an act of the Mississippi Territory . . . — Map (db m101591) HM
37Alabama (Clarke County), Jackson — First District Agricultural College and Experiment Station1896—1936
On this site was located the First District Agricultural College, authorized by an act of the Alabama Legislature and opened in 1896. The street in front was changed from Grove Hill Road to College Avenue in honor of the new school. An Experimental . . . — Map (db m101603) HM
38Alabama (Clarke County), Thomasville — Williams’ Temple CME Church
Founded by the CME (Christian Methodist Episcopal) Church as the only school for black students in the area in the early 1900’s, Williams’ Temple eventually consolidated with another school in Booker City to form Miles College near Birmingham. . . . — Map (db m101596) HM
39Alabama (Clarke County), Whatley — Reverend Timothy Horton Ball, A. M.
February 16, 1826, November 8, 1913. Minister, Teacher, Historian, Author. His love of history, natural resources and mankind led him to record events, past and present, writing many of his notes on the pommel of his saddle and also walking . . . — Map (db m83272) HM
40Alabama (Clay County), Lineville — John Richmond McCain
Teacher   Lawyer   Statesman He spent his life largely in promoting the welfare of others 1865   1939Map (db m95079) HM
41Alabama (Coffee County), Clintonville — Clintonville AcademyJanuary 11, 1860
Chartered as Clintonville Male and Female Academy. Building erected 1860: occupied January, 1861. The first school in Coffee County to teach beyond the sixth grade. Clintonville, for many years, was recognized as the cultural and educational center . . . — Map (db m54787) HM
42Alabama (Coffee County), Elba — Site of Curtis SchoolEarly 1900’s to 1967
Curtis School was organized in the early 1900’s and was originally located ½ mile south, where New Ebenezer Baptist Church now stands. A new school was built on this site in 1929 when Curtis, Mt. Zion, and Rhodes Schools were consolidated. . . . — Map (db m54741) HM
43Alabama (Coffee County), Enterprise — Enterprise AcademyFounded 1904
Beloved leader and principal of this institution, later known as Carroll Street School, was William M. Donald (1870-1941) His philosophy of education: "Apply yourself. Excellence is attained through self discipline and hard work. Learn the . . . — Map (db m71880) HM
44Alabama (Coffee County), New Brockton — Arwood School Site
Established here about 1871 and served as educational, cultural, religious and social center of this community until consolidation in 1934. School land was donated by George and Georgie Arwood. Early teachers included W.E. Andrews, Mrs. M.E. Fleming . . . — Map (db m95354) HM
45Alabama (Colbert County), LaGrange — LaGrange College1830-1855
In the early 1820s, wealthy landowners in the Leighton, Alabama, area established a village on the crest of the mountain to the southwest of this site. This community eventually had about 400 inhabitants and became known as LaGrange. In the 1820s, . . . — Map (db m141747) HM WM
46Alabama (Colbert County), LaGrange — LaGrange Military Academy1857-1862
After LaGrange College moved to Florence in January 1855, a group of LaGrange citizens organized a college in the vacant buildings under the old name. Rev. Felix Johnson was elected president. To increase the patronage, a military feature was . . . — Map (db m141750) WM
47Alabama (Colbert County), Leighton — LaGrange College
This is the site of LaGrange College Chartered in 1830 by act of the Legislature of Alabama An Institution of High Order for men attended chiefly by students from the southern states. The college was burned April 28, 1863 by Federal Cavalry . . . — Map (db m141745) HM
48Alabama (Colbert County), Muscle Shoals — Howell & Graves School
Marker Front: Muscle Shoals City was incorporated on April 24, 1923. Among the leading developers were New York realtors A.L. Howell and C.T. Graves. Their interest in Muscle Shoals was inspired by the vision of Henry Ford to use power from . . . — Map (db m28580) HM
49Alabama (Colbert County), Sheffield — Sheffield Colored School/Sterling High School
(side 1) Sheffield Colored School Public education for Sheffield's black children began in 1889 in a framed building at E. 20th St. and S. Atlanta Ave. with Henry Hopkins as teacher. Professor Benjamin J. Sterling (1847-1941), a . . . — Map (db m82423) HM
50Alabama (Colbert County), Sheffield — Village One
In 1918, during World War I, the U.S. Government built this unique village of 85 bungalows, school, and officers barracks to house personnel at nearby Nitrate Plant No. 1. Prefabricated and standard size materials were used in construction along . . . — Map (db m88110) HM
51Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — At This Well
Annie Sullivan Macy revealed the mystery of language to seven year old Helen Keller by spelling the word W-A-T-E-R into her hand as water flowed over the other hand — Map (db m106094) HM
52Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Ivy GreenBirthplace of Helen Keller
The Family Home of Captain Arthur M. & Kate Adams Keller was built 1820, being the second house erected in Tuscumbia. Here on June 27, 1880 was born America's First Lady of Courage Helen Adams Keller — Map (db m29089) HM
53Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Trenholm High School
(side 1) Formal education for Tuscumbia’s African American children began in 1870 at the Freedman School taught by Judge Wingo and his daughter in a church at the foot of the hill. In July 1877, the Osborne Colored Academy was established . . . — Map (db m80944) HM
54Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — William Winston Home
Construction on the home which became the center building of Deshler High School was begun in 1824 by Clark T. Barton. William Winston purchased and completed the Georgian-style dwelling in 1833. The largest remaining antebellum house in Tuscumbia, . . . — Map (db m28565) HM
55Alabama (Conecuh County), Burnt Corn — First School in Conecuh County
The first known school in Conecuh County, "Students Retreat," was located near this site. The land was owned by John Green, who also was the school’s first teacher. Green served the county in the state House of Representatives and the 1861 Secession . . . — Map (db m81295) HM
56Alabama (Conecuh County), Evergreen — Alabama Baptist Children’s Home Site
The Louise Short Baptist Widows’ and Orphans’ Home, consisting of a 10-room brick residence and related buildings on 80 acres of land fronted on Main Street, Evergreen, for more than ¼ mile. It was established by the Alabama Baptist State . . . — Map (db m81293) HM
57Alabama (Conecuh County), Evergreen — In Honor of Native Son Ernest Stanley Crawford, M.D.
This pioneer surgeon, teacher and medical statesman was born May 12, 1922 in Evergreen. He worked at Conecuh Drug Company as a youngster and graduated from Evergreen High School (1940). His undergraduate degree was received from the University of . . . — Map (db m81289) HM
58Alabama (Covington County), Andalusia — Andalusia City Hall / Three Notch School
Andalusia City Hall Today, the Andalusia City Hall houses city government offices and is a host site for meetings and special events. Modern information, technology, and communications of city government mesh with the original . . . — Map (db m94169) HM
59Alabama (Covington County), Lockhart — W.S. Harlan School
William Stewart Harlan was the manager of Jackson Lumber Company in Lockhart, established in the early twentieth century as a mill town during the booming demand for longleaf yellow pine. Marketed as Dixie Rift Flooring and Dixie Poles and . . . — Map (db m111256) HM
60Alabama (Covington County), Sanford — Town of Sanford
Side 1 Sanford first came into being as a community post office which was established on May 19, 1879. Around the turn of the century, Sanford had a period of progress that lasted for several years. The L&N Railroad had come through in . . . — Map (db m94166) HM
61Alabama (Crenshaw County), Highland Home — Site of Highland Home College
A pioneer institution organized in 1889 by Justus M. Barnes, Samuel Jordan and Milton L. Kirkpatrick. This was an extension of Strata Academy, founded in 1856 by Barnes six miles north in Strata. In 1881 Strata Academy was moved to Highland Home and . . . — Map (db m72058) HM
62Alabama (Cullman County), Hanceville — The Little School House
The Little School House was constructed in 1898 by the men of the Garden City Colonization Society. German immigrants were lured South by the railroad land agents' promise of a new life. Almost all the families of the school children were farmers; . . . — Map (db m156412) HM
63Alabama (Cullman County), Holly Pond — The History of Holly Pond School
Side 1 In 1873, a one-room schoolhouse was built in Holly Pond in the triangle between Highway 278 and the Blountsville Road. In 1890-91, a new two-story, four-room frame structure was built on Highway 278, across from the Baptist church. . . . — Map (db m156418) HM
64Alabama (Dale County), Newton — Baptist Collegiate InstituteNewton, Alabama
Organized in 1898 under the Christian leadership of A. W. Tate and Newton Baptist Church. The property was later given to the Baptists of southeast Alabama, adopted by nine Baptist Associations. In 1907 Baptist State Convention agreed to accept . . . — Map (db m79000) HM
65Alabama (Dale County), Ozark — D. A. Smith High School/ Professor D. A. Smith, PrincipalDale County
D. A. Smith High School Dale County The first school building on this site for African Americans was constructed in 1939 and was named Ozark Negro High School. It was replaced during the “separate but equal” period in 1952 and . . . — Map (db m132087) HM
66Alabama (Dale County), Pinckard — The Mack M. Matthews School
Front The original part of this building was home to one of the oldest African American schools in Dale County. In 1949 on this site, the new building for the Pinckard Colored School was constructed and Mack M. Matthews became its . . . — Map (db m115029) HM
67Alabama (Dallas County), Beloit — The Beloit Industrial Institute
Marker Front: The Beloit Industrial Institute was founded in 1888 by Industrial Missionary Association, an area subdivision of the American Missionary Associations. The President of the Association, Dr. Charles B. Curtis, was a Presbyterian . . . — Map (db m83504) HM
68Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — R.B. Hudson High SchoolDallas County
This school was the city of Selma's first public high school for African-Americans. Completed in 1949, the school was named in honor of Richard Byron Hudson, a black educator who had served for 41 years as principal of Clark Elementary School, . . . — Map (db m82741) HM
69Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Sgt Robert Weakley PattonBorn 1844 - Died 1865 — Battle of Selma —
Patton, a member of Shockley's Escort Company of the University of Alabama, was killed in a clash with the 4th Iowa Cavalry at the corner of Washington Street and Alabama Avenue. In November 1865 his father, Robert Miller Patton, was elected the . . . — Map (db m83587) HM
70Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Tabernacle Baptist ChurchDallas County
Side 1 In January 1885, Dr. Edward M. Brawley, President, Alabama Baptist Normal and Theological School (now Selma University) formed Tabernacle Baptist Church to be an integral part of the students' Christian formation and education. . . . — Map (db m82034) HM
71Alabama (DeKalb County), Fort Payne — Sequoyah(1760-1843)
Born in Tennessee, Sequoyah moved to Wills Town (DeKalb County, Alabama) area of the Cherokee Nation in 1818. Here, in 1821, he invented an 86 symbol alphabet providing the Cherokees with the only written Indian language in the United States. . . . — Map (db m28033) HM
72Alabama (DeKalb County), Fort Payne — Wills Town Mission
The mission was established in 1823 by the American Board of Missions to further education and Christianity among the Cherokee Indians. Mission operated until the Indian removal in 1838. Grave site of Reverend Ard Hoyt, first superintendent, . . . — Map (db m28035) HM
73Alabama (DeKalb County), Geraldine — Town of Geraldine: Home of the Bulldogs
(front) No one knows for sure how Geraldine got its name. Some say it was named for a lovely Indian maiden. The first official record was on September 5, 1882 when Mr. William A. Johnson applied for the location of a new post office. The . . . — Map (db m79905) HM
74Alabama (DeKalb County), Valley Head — Site of Cherokee Council Tree
Here stood The giant Black Spanish Oak Under which Traditionally Sequoyah Taught his newly invented Alphabet Tree felled by a storm 1934 — Map (db m28036) HM
75Alabama (Elmore County), Holtville — Holtville School
In the late 1930's and early 1940's Holtville School won national acclaim as one the foremost examples of the progressive education movement in the U.S. It was one of 33 southern schools in 1938 chosen to receive financial support in developing new . . . — Map (db m83689) HM
76Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Elmore County Training School
Constructed in 1924 on five acres, this building was one of nine schools constructed in Elmore County with funding assistance from the Julius Rosenwald Fund. Between 1912-32, Julius Rosenwald, a Jewish philanthropist and CEO of Sears, Roebuck and . . . — Map (db m70548) HM
77Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Welton Blanton Doby High SchoolElmore County
W. B. Doby served as the first President of the Elmore County Teachers Association, Principal of Elmore County Training School, and as an ordained minister in the A.M.E. Church. Local leaders dedicated this school for African-American students on . . . — Map (db m94614) HM
78Alabama (Escambia County), Atmore — Escambia County Training School
In 1920, a wooden building was constructed as the Atmore Colored School and operated until 1925. In 1926, a new wood and a brick building was erected with assistance from Rosenwald School fund and it was renamed the Escambia County Training School. . . . — Map (db m100835) HM
79Alabama (Escambia County), East Brewton — Downing-Shofner SchoolEast Brewton, 1906-1943
Dr. J. M. Shofner (1863-1926) founder, dedicated his life to - "Give the boys and girls a chance." Mr. Elisha Downing - Humanitarian. First building erected named in honor of Mrs. Esther Downing. Trustees-1906: J. M. Shofner, D. . . . — Map (db m84374) HM
80Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Eleventh Street School
The Eleventh Street School, built in 1907, was one of the earliest elementary schools in Gadsden. It is the only local surviving school building of that era. This two-story red brick structure has solid masonry exterior walls and an entrance which . . . — Map (db m83734) HM
81Alabama (Etowah County), Sardis City — Sardis City Beginnings
Sardis community derived its name from Sardis Baptist Church which was founded in 1882 on another site. There were 20 charter members. They met in a brush arbor until a building was completed in 1887, at this site. The church was a wooden, box frame . . . — Map (db m156365) HM
82Alabama (Franklin County), Red Bay — Red Bay School
The first school building was built around 1900 by local citizens. The building was located just across from the Methodist Church. The building was a one-room structure & there were 2 teachers who taught at the school. All pupils walked to school & . . . — Map (db m83748) HM
83Alabama (Geneva County), Geneva — Emma Knox Kenan LibraryFounded 1904
Mrs. Emma Knox Kenan established the library at the request of school superintendent W.W. Benson in a small cloak room of the Geneva School. The library was financed by subscriptions, book rentals and fund raisers. The property where the library now . . . — Map (db m131869) HM
84Alabama (Hale County), Gallion — Oak Grove School
Tuskegee educator Booker T. Washington and Julius Rosenwald, Sears, Roebuck & Company president, initiated one of the most ambitiuous school building programs for African Americans in the United States. The Oak Grove School is one example of the . . . — Map (db m83753) HM
85Alabama (Hale County), Greensboro — Southern University
Merged in 1918 as part of Birmingham Southern College. Founded here in 1856 by Methodist Church. Weathered War and Reconstruction to prosper in late 1800’s. Moved to Birmingham in 1918 on merger with Birmingham College, founded in 1896 . . . — Map (db m83756) HM
86Alabama (Henry County), Abbeville — Henry County Training SchoolEstablished 1914
Founded by Laura L. Ward. Building designed and constructed by Jim McCauley on land given by Glass Maybin. Classes began Sept., 1917. Principals who served school were: J. H. Jackson, W. R. Rosser, Felix Blackwood, Sr., and William B. Ward, Sr. . . . — Map (db m71809) HM
87Alabama (Henry County), Abbeville — The Southeast Alabama Agricultural School / First Free Secondary School in Alabama
Side 1 The Southeast Alabama Agricultural School This school and experiment station was created by Alabama Legislative Act No. 579, February 28, 1889. This was the first school in Alabama to offer free secondary education. SAAS . . . — Map (db m71808) HM
88Alabama (Henry County), Lawrenceville — Lawrenceville / Lawrenceville Academy
Lawrenceville This early cultural, educational and religious center was settled in 1823 and named for Joseph Lawrence, prominent pioneer, farmer, and extensive land owner. A Baptist and a Methodist Church were established here prior to . . . — Map (db m71825) HM
89Alabama (Henry County), Newville — Newville High School / Newville Rosenwald School
Side 1 Newville High School The first known school in Newville was at Center Church in 1881. When Grange Hall was built in 1891, church services and school were held on the first floor. In 1913, Grange Hall was torn down and the . . . — Map (db m71812) HM
90Alabama (Houston County), Cowarts — Cowarts Baptist Church / Cowarts School
(Front): Cowarts Baptist Church Cowarts Baptist Church was founded in 1885 when dissension arose in the Congregation of Smyrna. Originally located beside the cemetery, the church was destroyed by fire during the 1890s. It was rebuilt . . . — Map (db m64865) HM
91Alabama (Houston County), Dothan — Boyhood Home of Rev. Bob Jones
Near this spot was the boyhood home of Rev. Bob Jones, (1884-1968), D.D., L.L.D., internationally known evangelist and founder of Bob Jones University. The eleventh child of W. Alexander and Georgia Creel Jones, he was three months old when the . . . — Map (db m95353) HM
92Alabama (Houston County), Kinsey — Mallalieu Seminary
Side 1 Organized in 1882 at nearby Rocky Creek Methodist Church for educational purposes. This school, which occupied approximately seven acres surrounding this marker, was supported by the Methodist Episcopal Church North. This school . . . — Map (db m73374) HM
93Alabama (Jackson County), Flat Rock — Flat Rock High School1911 - 1929
In 1905. the Methodist Episcopal Church. South. authorized Dr. Frank Gardner and his wife, Annie, to begin Flat Rock School In 1911, Flat Rock High School formally opened. It was the only high school on Sand Mountain north of Albertville. The North . . . — Map (db m156167) HM
94Alabama (Jackson County), Stevenson — Averyville
During the Reconstruction Period following the Civil War, a freedmen’s community was established in this area called Averyville, named for the Pennsylvania minister and successful businessman Charles Avery, a longtime and faithful champion of Negro . . . — Map (db m108803) HM
95Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Birmingham - Southern College
. . . — Map (db m37711) HM
96Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Carrie A. Tuggle1858 - 1924
In Tribute to Carrie A. Tuggle 1858 - 1924 Scholar, Teacher and Christian. A life of unselfish service to the troubled and the homeless black boys and girls. In 1903, she founded a school and orphanage, the Tuggle . . . — Map (db m27391) HM
97Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Dr. Ruth J. Jackson1898 - 1982
Dedicated to Dr. Ruth J. Jackson 1898-1982 This woman of strength and vision graduated from the Poro School of Cosmetology, the first black registered school in the State of Alabama. At the vanguard of the Civil Rights Movement, she was . . . — Map (db m27090) HM
98Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Emory Overton Jackson1908 - 1975
Emory Overton Jackson was born on September 8, 1908 in Buena Vista, Georgia to Will Burt and Lovie Jones Jackson. E. O. Jackson and his seven siblings were raised in the middle-class Birmingham enclave of Enon Ridge, located on the west side of town . . . — Map (db m64736) HM
99Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Graymont Elementary School
On September 4, 1963, Graymont Elementary School was the first public school in Birmingham to be racially integrated. Two brothers, nine and eleven years old, accompanied by their father, James Armstrong, along with Reverend Fred . . . — Map (db m153229) HM
100Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Howard College(Now Samford University)
Founded in 1841 at Marion in Perry County by Alabama Baptists, Howard College was named for British prison reformer John Howard. The liberal arts college moved to this site in 1887 and relocated to its present campus in Homewood, Alabama in . . . — Map (db m26693) HM

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Sep. 21, 2020