Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
After filtering for Alabama, 231 entries match your criteria. The first 100 are listed. Next 100 ⊳
 
 

Cemeteries & Burial Sites Topic

 
Daniel Pratt Cemetery / George Cooke Marker Side B image, Touch for more information
By Tim Carr, August 1, 2009
Daniel Pratt Cemetery / George Cooke Marker Side B
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Daniel Pratt Cemetery / George Cooke
(Front): Daniel Pratt CemeteryFinal resting place of early Alabama industrialist Daniel Pratt, 1799-1873, and wife Esther Ticknor Pratt, 1803-1875. He was from New Hampshire and she, Connecticut. Married 1827 at Fortville, Jones County, . . . — Map (db m27957) HM
2Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Old Kingston Historical Cemetery
This cemetery is one of the oldest cemeteries in Autauga County having been established as a burial ground by at least 1841. The land was officially set aside as a burial ground when the county seat was in this area from 1834 to 1868. The area . . . — Map (db m82561) HM
3Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Rocky Mount Cemetery
Rocky Mount Cemetery was established on this sacred ground for families who settled Cobb’s Ford and the surrounding area. The oldest marked burials date to the 1890s. Numerous veterans of the Civil War and World Wars I and II are buried here. Rocky . . . — Map (db m158661) HM
4Alabama (Autauga County), White City — White City Cemetery
In 1870, Marbury Lumber Company donated land for the White Pond Methodist Church and Cemetery. It is believed that the first burial in the cemetery, marked only by a pile of bricks, took place that same year. The earliest marked grave is of Thomas . . . — Map (db m158662) HM
5Alabama (Baldwin County), Daphne — Colonia Italiana 1888-The Beautiful Forest / The Founding Fathers of the Italian Colony
Colonia Italiana 1888-The Beautiful Forest In 1888, Alesandro Mastro-Valerio, realizing the plight of fellow Italian immigrants living and working in hazardous conditions in many northern states, bought land here to attract colonists. He . . . — Map (db m130913) HM
6Alabama (Baldwin County), Fairhope — Confederate Rest Cemetery
The Grand Hotel and the Gunnison House served as a hospital for wounded Confederate soldiers from the Battle of Vicksburg during the Civil War. The Confederate Rest Cemetery commemorates more than 300 Confederate soldiers who died while in the . . . — Map (db m153433) HM
7Alabama (Baldwin County), Orange Beach — Orange Beach Community Cemetery — “Bear Point Cemetery” — Baldwin County —
(front) The property where the cemetery is located was part of a Spanish Land Grant issued to the Suarez family prior to the War of 1812. In 1925, a United States Land Patent was confirmed and issued. The property has been in use since . . . — Map (db m71618) HM
8Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Revolutionary War Battlefield and Burial Ground at Spanish Fort (1780-1781)
During the Revolutionary War, France, Spain, Britain, and the United States were interested in the fate of this region. In March 1780, Spanish forces captured Mobile. They established a palisaded fort with trenches (one mile north of here) to . . . — Map (db m61451) HM
9Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Saluda Hill Cemetery
Saluda Hill Cemetery is a private historical cemetery established in 1824. Among the graves here is that of Zachariah Godbold, the only known Revolutionary War veteran buried in Baldwin County. Many Blakeley residents and Confederate soldiers also . . . — Map (db m81854) HM
10Alabama (Barbour County), Batesville — Providence Methodist Church & Schoolhouse
Side 1 In 1828, Reverend John Wesley Norton left his native South Carolina with his family and a wagon train of followers, crossed into the Creek Indian Nation and just into the edge of what was then Pike County, settling near the . . . — Map (db m78123) HM
11Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Old Negro Cemetery / Fairview Cemetery
Interred on this gently sloping hillside are the remains of many of Eufaula’s early black citizens. Their names are known only to God because the wooden grave markers which located the burials have long since vanished. This burying ground was used . . . — Map (db m27987) HM
12Alabama (Barbour County), Midway — Ramah Baptist Church & Cemetery — Barbour County
Constructed in the 1840s and constituted in 1852, Ramah Baptist Church is in the community formerly known as both Ramah and Vaughn. Records show that the land for both the church and cemetery was given by Solomon G. and Francis T. Burke in . . . — Map (db m158553) HM
13Alabama (Barbour County), Midway — Spring Hill United Methodist Church
This Greek Revival church was built in 1841 by John Fletcher Comer with lumber from his mill. The building originally had a slave balcony and exterior stairway which were removed c. 1890. At the same time, the pulpit was moved from between the two . . . — Map (db m162143) HM
14Alabama (Bibb County), Centreville — Centreville Cemetery — Bibb County
Centreville Cemetery is older than the town of Centreville itself. The earliest known burial is that of Willie Coleman, dated 1822, and Centreville was established in 1823. One half of the cemetery, known as Cooper Cemetery, contains mostly the . . . — Map (db m156403) HM
15Alabama (Blount County), Oneonta — Antioch Cemetery — Blount County
Antioch (an'~te~ok') was an ancient Biblical city and a chief center of early Christianity. Today, many churches and cemeteries throughout the United States use the name. Once called Glover's Graveyard, the earliest recorded burial is 1794. Antioch . . . — Map (db m128071) HM
16Alabama (Bullock County), Aberfoil — Aberfoil Community
The town of Aberfoil was incorporated January 26, 1839, in then Macon County, with the first election for councilors conducted and managed by Lewis Stoudenmire, Charles G. Lynch, Thomas Scott, David Hudson, and A. J. and E. A. Jackson. Aberfoil was . . . — Map (db m61027) HM
17Alabama (Bullock County), Blues Old Stand — Samuel Sellers Cemetery
Samuel Sellers (1788-1857) of North Carolina arrived with his large family at Three Notch Road on January 29, 1835. Here, in what was then the Missouri Beat, Pike County, the first post office in the area was established, 2.5 miles west of . . . — Map (db m61061) HM
18Alabama (Bullock County), Union Springs — Log Cabin Museum/Old City Cemetery
Log Cabin Museum Early settlers of this area cleared land and built their first homes of logs in the early 1830s. This cabin was built by Reuben Rice Kirkland (1829-1915) about 1850. He and his first wife had ten children while living in . . . — Map (db m60969) HM
19Alabama (Bullock County), Union Springs — Sardis Baptist Church, Cemetery, and School
(side 1) Settlers from the Edgefield District, South Carolina, organized the Sardis Baptist Church on June 10, 1837. The first building, a log cabin, was constructed in 1841 after John M. and his wife Amy Youngblood Dozier deeded four and . . . — Map (db m67552) HM
20Alabama (Butler County), Fort Deposit — Oak Bowery
In March 1863 Francis and Sarah Sheppard gave 3 acres of land to Methodist Episcopal Church South as a place for worship and burial. 2 more acres given by Alexander and Mary Sheppard Oct. 1868. Property sold to County Line Primitive Baptist Church . . . — Map (db m70838) HM
21Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Pioneer Cemetery
Greenville's oldest, established 1819. Captain William Butler, for whom the county was named, buried here. He was killed fighting Indians led by Savannah Jack in March, 1818. Greenville's oldest church, a community church established in 1822, . . . — Map (db m70751) HM
22Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Site of Confederate Hospital — 1861 – 1865
Title is textMap (db m130053) HM
23Alabama (Calhoun County), Alexandria — Crook Cemetery
James Crook established this cemetery in 1837 on land he purchased from Creek Indians. In 1834, he and his family moved to this area from South Carolina. In Nov. 1837, Samuel M. Crook, grandson of James Crook, was the first person buried here. . . . — Map (db m36552) HM
24Alabama (Chambers County), LaFayette — Essie J. Handy Memorial Cemetery — Chambers County
Elisha and Essie Handy came to La Fayette in 1925. They were educators and active in civic and religious activities. In 1940 their oldest son, Ralph, died from tuberculosis and was buried in the only cemetery in La Fayette for African-Americans . . . — Map (db m151220) HM
25Alabama (Chambers County), LaFayette — LaFayette Cemetery — Chambers County
LaFayette Cemetery, also known as Westview, began in 1934 with the death of Miss Sarah Gipson. Many early pioneers and veterans of East Alabama are buried here including Revolutionary War Patriot Capt. Alexander Dunn, Col. Charles McLemore, . . . — Map (db m83263) HM
26Alabama (Cherokee County), Centre — Garrett Cemetery
Final resting place of Chief Pathkiller (B. 1749 - D. 1827) who served as principal chief of the Cherokee Nation. Many prominent early settlers are also interred here including newspaper editor and publisher, Confederate infantry captain and . . . — Map (db m114282) HM
27Alabama (Cherokee County), Spring Garden — Ladiga Cavalry Skirmish — October 28, 1864
Last fighting between armies of Hood and Sherman. Here Ferguson turned back Kilpatrick's larger force. These two armies had fought all summer from Chattanooga to Atlanta, west to here. To split South, Sherman turned, led Union forces . . . — Map (db m132782) HM
28Alabama (Chilton County), Marbury — Woven Wire Fence — 1904
Completed in 1904, this is one of only three remaining sections of the original woven wire fence at the Soldiers' Home. During the latter half of the nineteenth century woven wire and barbed wire began to replace wooden rail fences. Woven . . . — Map (db m129332) HM
29Alabama (Chilton County), Marbury — Woven Wire Fence — 1904
Completed in 1904, this is one of only three remaining sections of the original woven wire fence at the Soldiers' Home. During the latter half of the nineteenth century woven wire and barbed wire began to replace wooden rail fences. Woven . . . — Map (db m129425) HM
30Alabama (Chilton County), Stanton — Memorial to Union Dead at Battle of Ebenezer Church
Memorial to Union Soldiers Lost at the Battle of Old Ebenezer Church April 1, 1865 — Map (db m129770) WM
31Alabama (Chilton County), Thorsby — Scandinavian Cemetery
In 1896 Swedish settlers organized the Concordia Methodist Church and acquired this land for the Concordia Cemetery, later known as the Lutheran Cemetery. This is the former site of Strassburg School. In the 1980s it became known as the Scandinavian . . . — Map (db m83269) HM
32Alabama (Clarke County), Carlton — Mt. Nebo Death Masks
Side 1 Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Mt. Nebo Cemetery is home to the unique folk art of African American inventor and artist, Issac "Ike" Nettles, who used concrete to make images of living people's faces for . . . — Map (db m101576) HM
33Alabama (Clarke County), Rockville — Gravesite of Major Jeremiah Austill
Near this site, is the gravesite of Maj. Jeremiah Austill, folk hero & prominent figure in the early settlement of Clarke County. Born in 1794 in S. C., he lived, along with his parents, Capt. Evan and Sara Austill, among the Cherokee in Ga. Before . . . — Map (db m101588) HM
34Alabama (Clarke County), Thomasville — Airmount Grave Shelter And Cemetery
Front: This Greek Revival style brick structure is known as the Hope Family Grave Shelter. Constructed in 1853, it is listed on the National Register of Historical places. The unusual splayed eaves and vaulted or “compass” . . . — Map (db m47621) HM
35Alabama (Clarke County), Winn — Union Methodist Church
Established 1858, Ό mile east of here. Camp meetings were held in summers. Congregation moved to site near Peniel 1894. The "arbor" and church building were left at original site. These buildings convenient for annual encampment of county . . . — Map (db m101579) HM
36Alabama (Colbert County), Barton — Civil War Skirmish at The Barton Cemetery / Civil War Skirmishes at Barton
Bullet - marked tombstones in this cemetery show evidence of a brisk skirmish here Oct. 26, 1863, when Gen. P.J. Osterhaus's first division of Sherman's Corps came under fire from Gen. S.D. Lee's Confederate troops. CSA artillery on a hill near a . . . — Map (db m83329) HM
37Alabama (Colbert County), Ford City — The Old Brick Presbyterian Church — 1820
Old Brick Church began in 1820 as the Mt. Pleasant Cumberland Presbyterian Church and met in a frame building which burned in 1824. The present building has undergone few changes since its construction in 1828 when the congregation was officially . . . — Map (db m147370) HM
38Alabama (Colbert County), Leighton — William Leigh — Founder of Leighton
(side 1) The town of Leighton was named in honor of the Reverend William Leigh, son and grandson of Revolutionary War veterans. He was born in Amelia County Virginia, Oct 4, 1790 and moved to Alabama about 1823.
Leigh settled nearby . . . — Map (db m106112) HM
39Alabama (Colbert County), Sheffield — 101 Memorial — World War I
Dedicated to Civilian defense workers in critical industry for the war. US Army directed construction and production via Air Nitrate Corp. Army Projects here in 1917-1918 required 20,000 workers recruited from across the USA. The great flu-pandemic . . . — Map (db m138776) HM WM
40Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Tuscumbia's Oakwood Cemetery
This burial ground was designated on General John Coffee's 1817 survey and original map "Plan of a Town at the Coldwater Spring." The oldest tombstone carries the burial date 1821 and the cemetery contains graves of veterans from all wars beginning . . . — Map (db m28567) HM
41Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Winston Cemetery
The Winston family settled this area in the early 1820s. Andrew Jackson purchased the property at the U.S. government land sale and conveyed it to Col. Anthony Winston (1782-1841) who lived nearby in a two-story brick Federal-style house (razed . . . — Map (db m28566) HM
42Alabama (Conecuh County), Burnt Corn — John Green Cemetery — Conecuh County
War of 1812 veteran John Green (1790-1882) settled in Burnt Corn in 1816. He held many public offices, established the first school, and represented Conecuh County in the state legislature in 1824 and 1829. He was the Conecuh delegate to the . . . — Map (db m81285) HM
43Alabama (Coosa County), Rockford — Peace & Goodwill Cemetery
Peace & Goodwill Cemetery is Coosa County's first African American Cemetery to be placed on the prestigious Alabama Historic Cemetery Register. It provides powerful insights about the diligence and commitment of our African Ancestors. Family . . . — Map (db m64587) HM
44Alabama (Crenshaw County), Rutledge — Rutledge Primitive Baptist Church
The Rutledge Primitive Baptist Church was built circa 1890, on land donated by Thomas Warren Shows and his family. The Rutledge Primitive Baptist Church was a member of the Ebenezer Primitive Baptist Association, which was formed in 1837. It was one . . . — Map (db m72054) HM
45Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — Colonel John G. Cullmann — Founder of Cullman, Alabama 1873 — 1823 - 1895 —
Col. John G. Cullmann July 2, 1823 - December 3, 1895 Thrifty German Colonists led by Col. John G. Cullmann in 1873 settled this thinly populated plateau of Alabama. — Map (db m35629) HM
46Alabama (Cullman County), Holly Pond — Holly Pond Cemetery — Established 1894 — Listed in Alabama Historic Cemetery Register 2014 —
Marked by an antique arch, the Holly Pond Cemetery encompasses 10 acres and a chapel built in 1975. The site was chosen to replace the burial ground in the center of town and make room for the town to grow. The first acre was deeded to the deacons . . . — Map (db m160676) HM
47Alabama (Cullman County), Logan — Shady Grove Methodist Church And Cemetery
Early settlers to Cullman County established Shady Grove Methodist Episcopal Church as a brush arbor in the 1870s on land homesteaded and donated by Richard McCain. Trustees, J. J. McKissack, W. H. Martin, J. C. Vickery, J. W. Kilgo, together with . . . — Map (db m34244) HM
48Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahaba's "New" Cemetery
Created by the Legislature This cemetery was created by an act of Alabama's Legislature on January 31, 1852. Cahaba's town council selected this spot, but the Legislature had to confirm their choice because all public land within . . . — Map (db m150864) HM
49Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Memorials for Prisoners of War
These are not graves. These are markers to memoralize the Federal soldiers who died in the Cahawba Military Prison during the Civil War. The men within the prison called it "Castle Morgan." No one knows where in Cahawba these . . . — Map (db m112409) HM
50Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — New Cemetery
Burials in this cemetery, which served Cahaba from 1848 to 1900, tell a story of the town in which many deaths resulted from diseases of infancy, childhood and early adult life, Yellow Fever being a large factor because of proximity to Gulf of . . . — Map (db m23322) HM
51Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Old Cemetery
This site was set aside by the 1820 General Assembly, burials here date from 1818 to 1847. Interred are some of the state's earliest figures. There is no record of names, many handsome tombs have been destroyed, seven marked ones remaining, six are . . . — Map (db m23355) HM
52Alabama (Dallas County), Marion Junction — Prosperity Cemetery
Prosperity Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church Cemetery is the resting place of many members of the church from 1846 until 1961. The Church was organized in 1822 by Isaac Grier. A church building stood on this site from 1844 until 1891, . . . — Map (db m112357) HM
53Alabama (Dallas County), Orrville — Whitt Cemetery
Whitt Cemetery has been placed on the Alabama Historic Cemetery Register by the Alabama Historical Commission — Map (db m112356) HM
54Alabama (Dallas County), Pleasant Hill — Mount Carmel Church
A Cumberland Presbyterian church named Mt. Pleasant was organized here about 1821 by Rev. William James Moor, a missionary from the Elk Presbytery of Tennessee. Renamed Mount Carmel in 1827, this church provided early leadership for the Ala. . . . — Map (db m75777) HM
55Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Live Oak Cemetery
East portion reserved for graveyard, 1829; west part purchased City of Selma, 1877. Here are buried: William Rufus King, 1786-1853, Vice President of U.S. 1853. John Tyler Morgan, 1824-1907, U.S. Senator, Brig. Gen. C.S.A. Edmund . . . — Map (db m37653) HM
56Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Valley Creek Presbyterian Church — One of state’s first Presbyterian churches
Established in 1816 by eight families from Rocky River Presbyterian Church in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. In 1859 this two-story brick building replaced original wooden structure. Sanctuary and former slave gallery are on second . . . — Map (db m83683) HM
57Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — William Rufus de Vane King — 1786-1853
Native Sampson County, North Carolina. Admitted to bar, 1806. North Carolina House of Commons 1807-1809. U.S. Congressman 1811-16. Secretary U.S. Legation Naples and St. Petersburg 1816-1818. Moved to Dallas County, Alabama, 1818. . . . — Map (db m37654) HM
58Alabama (Dallas County), Valley Grande — Childers Chapel
Established circa 1819 as Childers Meeting House on land given by George Childers. Patent for the land was issued to George Childers March 16, 1819. This Methodist Church was later known as Childers Chapel. Church burned in 1842. Congregation . . . — Map (db m37646) HM
59Alabama (DeKalb County), Fort Payne — Site of the Willstown Mission — 1823-1839
Also resting place of Supt Ard Hoyt 1770-1828 Missionary to the Cherokee Indians Here and at Brainerd 1818-1828 — Map (db m36965) HM
60Alabama (Escambia County), Brewton — Franklin Cemetery — Escambia County
Franklin Cemetery was established in the mid-nineteenth century and was originally located on land where the existing Georgia-Pacific Brewton LLC containerboard mill stands off of Highway 31 in Brewton. The cemetery served as the primary burial . . . — Map (db m94163) HM
61Alabama (Escambia County), Brewton — Pilgrims' Rest Cemetery
This cemetery was established in 1854 when Pilgrims' Rest Baptist Church was founded across the road on September 17 in that same year. The cemetery remained prominent in Alco even though the original congregation moved and Alco Methodist Church . . . — Map (db m130672) HM
62Alabama (Escambia County), Brewton — Union Cemetery
Union Cemetery has been an important resting place for Brewton's loved ones since at least 1879. State officials acknowledged the historical significance of Union Cemetery for our area by adding it to the Alabama Historic Cemetery Register . . . — Map (db m94162) HM
63Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Southern Hill Cemetery — Etowah County
Established in 1826 as "The Colored Cemetery," this site is the first and largest African-American cemetery in Gadsden. In 1918, the Mosaic Templars of America, a fraternal organization who provided African Americans with death and burial . . . — Map (db m167227) HM
64Alabama (Etowah County), Rainbow City — Harmony Baptist Church
Oldest church in Etowah County. Organized Saturday, April 2, 1831, at Harmony Meeting House, which was built in 1821, by Edmond Jones at this location. It was here that the Wills Creek Baptist Association was organized in 1836, Harmony being . . . — Map (db m156370) HM
65Alabama (Etowah County), Rainbow City — Old Harmony Cemetery
In the summer of 1784 William Jones and his two young sons were among a group of families from Georgia making their way through this area following the Old High Town Path. They camped here near a large spring and planned to continue their journey . . . — Map (db m156371) HM
66Alabama (Etowah County), Rainbow City — Site of 1784 Indian Massacre
The lone survivor being Edmond Jones, 5 year old son of William and Hannah Humphries Jones, who later gave the land for the cemetery. — Map (db m156398) HM
67Alabama (Geneva County), Hartford — Earliest Church In Hartford
Organized on June 30, 1888 by thirteen charter members as Dundee Missionary Baptist Church. The congregation originally worshipped in a brush arbor on this present site. The first church building was erected from pine slabs in the summer of 1886. . . . — Map (db m39125) HM
68Alabama (Henry County), Abbeville — The First Baptist Church of Abbeville/Abbeville Pioneer Cemetery
Side 1 The First Baptist Church of Abbeville This church was founded in 1834 as a mission of the Lawrenceville Baptist Church. Reverend Jeremiah Campbell was one of the early pastors. Later meetings were held in the lower story . . . — Map (db m71807) HM
69Alabama (Henry County), Haleburg — Mt. Zion Baptist Church
Constituted to the Glory of God, circa 1871, by former slaves in the area that later became Halesburg (now Haleburg), Alabama in 1885. Mt. Zion Church is one of the oldest African-American wooden frame churches in service in Alabama's Wiregrass . . . — Map (db m165975) HM
70Alabama (Henry County), Headland — Piney Grove Primitive Baptist Church and Cemetery
Side 1 An arm of the Shilo Primitive Baptist Church located near the Abby Creek, began meeting near the Three Cornered Pond just south of here in 1848. A new church called Piney Grove was constituted on April 21, 1849, by the hands of . . . — Map (db m71815) HM
71Alabama (Henry County), Newville — Newville Baptist Church / Newville Baptist Church Cemetery
Side 1 Newville Baptist Church A small Baptist congregation met under a brush arbor in 1876, near what later became the village of Wells which grew into the town of Newville, Alabama. A log church called Center was erected in . . . — Map (db m71814) HM
72Alabama (Henry County), Newville — Old Center Methodist Church/Old Center Cemetery
Old Center Methodist Church The church was organized in 1859. The first building was a log structure located just NW of the present building. In the 1870's it was part of the Newton Circuit and was served by a minister who lived in the . . . — Map (db m71831) HM
73Alabama (Houston County), Columbia — Columbia Cemetery — Houston County
Front The Columbia Cemetery was started in the 1830s on land given by Rev. Edmund Talbot. It postdates the abandoned Omussee Creek Church Cemetery located a mile SW of here. A "public Meeting house," which served as the Columbia . . . — Map (db m115031) HM
74Alabama (Houston County), Gordon — Gordon Cemetery / Early Gordon Leaders
(side 1) Gordon Cemetery Mr. William Wood (b. 22 Mar. 1826, d. 15 Oct. 1885), a prominent Gordon businessman, donated one acre of land located north of the town center adjacent to the old river road, now U.S. Highway 95, from . . . — Map (db m73371) HM
75Alabama (Houston County), Rehobeth — Big Creek United Methodist Church / Joseph Watford Revolutionary War Veteran
(side 1) Big Creek United Methodist Church One of the oldest churches in southeast Alabama and reportedly the oldest church in Houston County. The first church structure was a log building constructed about 20 yards north of the . . . — Map (db m73356) HM
76Alabama (Jackson County), Hollywood — Bellefonte Cemetery / Town of Bellefonte
(Front): Before the courthouse was completed, the community selected a location for a cemetery. The highest elevation in Bellefonte's corporate limits was chosen as the town's burial place. The earliest inscribed marker in Bellefonte Cemetery . . . — Map (db m83790) HM
77Alabama (Jackson County), Hollywood — Old Baptist Cemetery — Jackson County
A historically significant 19th century burial site, the Old Baptist Cemetery is located in Hollywood, Alabama, in the area formerly known as the Mud Creek Primitive Baptist Church. The cemetery is named for the oldest documented Baptist church in . . . — Map (db m166946) HM
78Alabama (Jackson County), Scottsboro — Robert Thomas Scott, Sr. — Scottsboro Founder / Successful Pioneer
Robert T. Scott, born in 1800 into a prominent North Carolina family who originally settled in Maryland, founded the Alabama town that bears his name. Between 1848 and 1858, he acquired 1,240 acres of choice land in the heart of Jackson County. . . . — Map (db m166957) HM
79Alabama (Jefferson County), Bessemer — Hosea Holcombe — 1780-1841 — "Alabama's first church historian" —
In 1840 he published his study, History of Rise and Progress of the Baptists in Alabama. Also an evangelist and missionary. In 1818 moved to Alabama from Carolinas, organizing five churches in vicinity. President of Alabama Baptist . . . — Map (db m27025) HM
80Alabama (Jefferson County), Bessemer — Union Baptist Church And Cemetery
Union Baptist Church was organized in 1834 by 18 or 20 members from Canaan Church. The Libscomb area was then known as East End. Members of the Rockett and Ware families donated the original two acreas of this site and a log cabin, which served as . . . — Map (db m24352) HM
81Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — 1963 Church Bombing Victims
This cemetery is the final resting place of three of the four young girls killed in the September 15, 1963 church bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church. Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley and Carol Robertson are buried here. The fourth victim, . . . — Map (db m61197) HM
82Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Forrest Camp No. 1435
We salute the Confederate soldier with affection, reverence, and undying devotion to the cause for which he fought. — Map (db m12240) HM
83Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Lane Park
In 1822 William Pullen, Revolutionary War veteran, acquired this land from the Federal Government for farming. In 1889 his heirs sold the land to the City of Birmingham for use as the New Southside Cemetery which operated from 1889 to 1909 with . . . — Map (db m27096) HM
84Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — New Hope Cemetery — Jefferson County
New Hope Baptist Church and Cemetery were established here on land with a log house donated by Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Jackson Glass on August 21, 1884, for religious and educational purposes. The five-member church began with trustee Manson Glass. On . . . — Map (db m83832) HM
85Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — United Confederate Veterans
In Memory of the Confederate Soldiers. In Memory of the Women of the Confederacy. In God we trust. — Map (db m12241) HM
86Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — United Confederate Veterans — Camp Hardee No. 39
(front): United Confederate Veterans Camp Hardee No. 39 Camp Hardee No. 39 was organized as a camp of the United Confederate Veterans on August 7, 1891. This cemetery plot was acquired by the camp to provide a final resting place for the men . . . — Map (db m12487) HM
87Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Wilson Chapel And Cemetery — ("The Little Brown Church in the Wildwood")
Wilson Chapel was built in 1916 as a memorial to James and Frances Wilson by their daughters, Rosa Wilson Eubanks and Minerva Wilson Constantine. At the time of its construction the area was developing into a community of country homes known as . . . — Map (db m26681) HM
88Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Zion Memorial Gardens
Mt. Zion Baptist Church began burying here in the mid-1800s. On June 2, 1970, New Grace Hill Cemetery, Inc., a subsidiary of the Booker T. Washington Insurance Company in Birmingham, purchased this cemetery and officially named it Zion Memorial . . . — Map (db m35602) HM
89Alabama (Jefferson County), Clay — Clay Methodist Cemetery — Jefferson County
Local Methodist connections for Clay Methodist Church were Cedar Mountain Church and Shiloh Methodist Church. Samuel, a Revolutionary War soldier, was a notable member of these early churches. Many of his descendants are buried here. James Self . . . — Map (db m117209) HM
90Alabama (Jefferson County), Clay — Mount Calvary Cemetery — Clay, Alabama — formerly Ayers, Alabama —
The oldest marked grave is that of Nancy Paerson, daughter of William S. Turner who was born September 23, 1813 and died September 19, 1830. Jesse Taylor deeded land for this church and graveyard on February 15, 1856. Listed in the Alabama . . . — Map (db m25134) HM
91Alabama (Jefferson County), Clay — Pioneer Massey Cemetery
Samuel Massey and his brother - in - law, Duke William Glenn, first came to this Territory in February 1814 with Lt. Col Reuben Nash's Regt. South Carolina Volunteer Militia to help defeat the Creek Indians in the War of 1812. Samuel Massey returned . . . — Map (db m25088) HM
92Alabama (Jefferson County), Clay — Wear Cemetery
Established about 1850, Wear Cemetery is located off Old Springville Road to the northeast at Countryside Circle. In the 1800's the Wear family was among the first settlers of the community later known as Clay. Twenty-three remaining graves were . . . — Map (db m25113) HM
93Alabama (Jefferson County), Homewood — Union Hill Cemetery
Union Hill Cemetery is the burial ground of many pioneers and early settlers of the Shades Valley area. It was established in the 1870s, but includes gravestones dating back to the early 1850s due to the relocation of two earlier, smaller cemeteries . . . — Map (db m83873) HM
94Alabama (Jefferson County), Homewood — Union Hill Cemetery, Union Hill Methodist Episcopal Church, Union Hill School
This cemetery is the final resting place of many of Shades Valley's pioneer residents. A few of the earliest headstones date from the mid-1850s. Descendants of these settlers helped mold the cities of Mountain Brook and Homewood. Located on property . . . — Map (db m26294) HM
95Alabama (Jefferson County), Hoover — Patton Chapel Church 1866
Just after the War Between the States Robert Berry Patton gave seven acres of land, logs from his sawmill to build a church, school and cemetery. He served as the first pastor. Fire destroyed the church in 1908 and 1938. The school served the area . . . — Map (db m83915) HM
96Alabama (Jefferson County), Leeds — Mt. Hebron Cemetery — Jefferson County
In April 1836, William White donated land for a church and cemetery. In December 1904, William T. Simmons and his wife R. A. sold adjoining land to the church adding to the cemetery. The oldest marked grave is for Hepsey Herring who died October 8, . . . — Map (db m83917) HM
97Alabama (Jefferson County), Leeds — Shiloh Cemetery — Established Circa 1820
Shiloh Cemetery is the first recorded Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery in middle Alabama. Burial at Shiloh began in 1820, a year before the Shiloh Cumberland Presbyterian Church organized in 1821 at Oakridge, now Leeds. The cemetery stood back from . . . — Map (db m49350) HM
98Alabama (Jefferson County), Mulga — Historic Lakeview Cemetery
This cemetery is owned by St. John Baptist Church in Edgewater and operated by Scott-McPherson Funeral Home, Inc. US Steel Corporation previously owned the area and it is historically associated with the Edgewater Mining Camp community established . . . — Map (db m37221) HM
99Alabama (Lauderdale County), Elgin — Daniel White — Settled Here in 1818
Daniel White, native of North Carolina, purchased land here in 1818, a year before Alabama became a state. His home and stagecoach stop, "Wayside Inn" was a large two~ story log house located on the North side of the highway from this site. In 1834 . . . — Map (db m29170) HM
100Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — "Mountain" Tom Clark — Hanged September 4, 1872
The notorious outlaw gang leader who boasted that no one would ever run over Tom Clark lies buried near the center of Tennessee Street where now all who pass by do run over him. In 1872, Clark, who terrorized helpless citizens during the Civil . . . — Map (db m80320) HM

231 entries matched your criteria. The first 100 are listed above. Next 100 ⊳
 
Paid Advertisement
Feb. 27, 2021