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Potawatomi Trail of Death Historical Markers

In 1838 over 850 Potawatomi Indians were forced by gunpoint off their homeland in Indiana and ‘marched’ approximately 660 miles to the State of Kansas for relocation — causing approximately 42 deaths along the way.
 
Wide View - - Potawatomi Trail of Death Marker image, Touch for more information
By Al Wolf, June 30, 2010
Wide View - - Potawatomi Trail of Death Marker
Illinois (Champaign County), Homer — Potawatomi Trail of Death — Davis' Point Encampment — September 20, 1838
Some 800 Potawatomi were forcibly removed by U.S. and Indiana officials from near Plymouth, Indiana and taken to eastern Kansas in 1838. Enroute 39 recorded deaths occurred. This tragic event became known as the “Trail of Death”. The . . . — Map (db m32503) HM
Illinois (Champaign County), Sadorus — Potawatomi Trail of Death — Sadorus's Grove Encampment — September 22, 1838
Over 800 Potawatomi were forcibly removed from near Plymouth, Indiana by U. S. And Indiana Officials and taken to eastern Kansas in 1838. This historic event was named the “Trail of Death” after the tragic occurrence of 39 recorded . . . — Map (db m33251) HM
Illinois (Champaign County), Sidney — Potawatomi Trail of Death — Sidney Encampment — September 21, 1838
Over 800 Potawatomi encamped at Sidney after their forced removal by U.S. and Indiana officials from near Plymouth, Indiana. They were being marched to eastern Kansas. Two people died at Sidney, including a child. A total of 39 Potawatomi tragically . . . — Map (db m33248) HM
Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Potawatomi Trail of Death — Sangamon Crossing — 24 - 26 September, 1838
Forcibly removed from northen Indiana to eastern Kansas, over 800 Potawatomi encamped here, cared for sick, and were allowed to hunt; 2 children and 1 woman died; 39 deaths occurred along the entire route. Sponsors: Hanson Engineers, . . . — Map (db m33284) HM
Illinois (Piatt County), Monticello — Potawatomi Trail of Death
We honor the pioneers and the three Native Americans who died here while on the Trail of Death march in 1838 and are buried in this cemetery — Map (db m33255) HM
Illinois (Piatt County), Monticello — Trail of Death — Pyatt's Point — Sept. 21, 1838
About 800 Potawatomi Indians camped at Pyatt’s Point during a forced march from Twin-Lakes, Ind. To the reservation on the Osage River, Kansas. One woman, three children were buried during this stop. — Map (db m33262) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), New Berlin — Potawatomi Trail of Death — McCoys Mill Encampment — Sept 4 - Nov 4, 1838
Potawatomi Trail of Death Sept 4 - Nov 4, 1838 McCoys Mill Encampment During a drought, 850 Potawatomi Indians were force-marched more than 600 miles from Indiana to Kansas. 40 died, mostly children. After a 17 mile march from the . . . — Map (db m32537) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), New Berlin — Potawatomi Trail of Death — Island Grove Encampment — Sept 4-Nov 4, 1838
Potawatomi Trail of Death Sept 4 - Nov 4, 1838 Island Grove Encampment During a drought, 850 Potawatomi Indians were force-marched more than 600 miles from Indiana to Kansas. 40 died, mostly children. After a 6 mile march from McCoy's . . . — Map (db m32538) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Potawatomi Trail of Death
On Sept. 29, 1838, 800 Potawatomi Indians marched through Springfield on the forced removal from Indiana to Kansas. Although many had died and they faced severe hardship, they were encouraged by Judge Polke and Chief I-o-weh to exhibit pride, so . . . — Map (db m34320) HM
Illinois (Vermilion County), Catlin — Potawatomi - A Trail of Death — Sandusky Point Encampment
. . . — Map (db m11191) HM
Illinois (Vermilion County), Danville — Trail of Death 1838 — Ellsworth Park
In 1838 the northern Potawatami tribes and many Indians from other tribes were forcibly relocated to Eastern Kansas. The first point to encampment in Illinois on the march westward was near the North Fork River in Danville. This monument is . . . — Map (db m32501) HM
Indiana (Carroll County), Delphi — Trail of Death — September 10, 1838 — "Winnemac's" Old Village
Here at Chief Winamac's old village, about 900 Potawatomi Indians camped on their forced removal from Indiana to Kansas. A child and a man died here during the encampment. They also left behind 24 too sick to continue. — Map (db m35399) HM
Indiana (Carroll County), Pittsburg — Trail of Death — Pleasant Run
On September 11, 1838, about 850 Potawatomi Indians camped at Pleasant Run, having traveled 17 miles that day on the forced removal from Indiana to Kansas. — Map (db m35400) HM
Indiana (Cass County), Logansport — Potawatomi Encampment — Trail of Death
On this site in the Fall of 1838 they celebrated a Mass, received aid for the sick, and buried their dead. — Map (db m35398) HM
Indiana (Fulton County), Rochester — Father Petit and the Potawatomi 'Trail of Death' — Indiana to Kansas, September 4 - November 4, 1838
Rev. Benjamin Marie Petit, of the City of Rennes, France, arrived as the Catholic missionary to the Potawatomi Indians in northern Indiana in November 1837. By June 1838, he had learned much of their difficult language and their culture, and had . . . — Map (db m35500) HM
Indiana (Fulton County), Rochester — 25.1949.1 — Michigan Road
Extending from Michigan City to the Ohio River at Madison. Begun by the state in 1832 with funds obtained from sale of land granted by the Potawatomi Indians. Opened northern part of state to settlers. — Map (db m35346) HM
Indiana (Fulton County), Rochester — Potawatomi "Trail of Death" — Indiana to Kansas, September 4 - November 4, 1838
On September 5, 1838, nearly 850 Potawatomi Indians marched single file through Rochester on the forced removal from Indiana to Western Territory (Kansas). Three chiefs were transported in a jail wagon: Menominee, Black Wolf, and Pepinewa. There . . . — Map (db m35501) HM
Indiana (Fulton County), Rochester — Site of Indian Village Chippewa-Nung — Potawatomi - Trail of Death
. . . — Map (db m35347) HM
Indiana (Fulton County), Rochester — Trail of Death — Mud Creek
Site of the first death of an Indian child on forced removal of Potawatomies Sept. 5, 1838. — Map (db m35397) HM
Indiana (Fulton County), Rochester — William Polke House
Built in 1834 by William Polke, first white settler in Fulton County, this is the oldest and first frame house in the county and the first frame house built north of Wabash River. It was called the White House and was a stagecoach inn on the . . . — Map (db m35327) HM
Indiana (Marshall County), Plymouth — Chief Menominee
In memory of Chief Menominee and his band of 859 Pottawatomie Indians removed from this Reservation Sept. 4, 1838 by a company of soldiers under command of General John Tipton, authorized by Governor David . . . — Map (db m36122) HM
Indiana (Marshall County), Plymouth — Menominee Chapel — Potawatomi - Trail of Death
Site of Pottawatomie Indian Church at Chi Chi Pi Ou Ti pe Twin Lakes First Church in Marshall County erected 1827 by Father Badin. First Catholic Priest ordained in U. S. 1838 the Indians were moved westward and the Chapel was . . . — Map (db m35326) HM
Indiana (Marshall County), Plymouth — Potawatomi Indian Village
Archaeological evidence suggests that Chief Menominee's Village was located approximately 2½ miles southeast of here on the northern bank of the Yellow River near Wolf Creek. — Map (db m40806) HM
Indiana (Marshall County), Plymouth — 50.1949.1 — Trail of Death
Two miles east, on north bank of Twin Lakes, some 800 Potawatomi Indians were collected in August 1838 and forced to begin their long march to new homes in the West. Many perished on the way. — Map (db m2307) HM
Indiana (Tippecanoe County), Battle Ground — Potawatomi ‘Trail of Death’ Route
Indiana to Kansas, September 4 - November 4, 1838 The 1811 Battle of Tippecanoe on this site was decisive, leading to the loss of their homelands and the removal of Indians from Indiana. At Gunpoint, about 850 Potawatomi passed this location . . . — Map (db m6433) HM
Indiana (Tippecanoe County), Lafayette — Trail of Death — September 13, 1838 — Lagrange on Wabash River
Over 850 Potawatomi Indians camped here on the Wabash River in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, Sept. 13, 1838, on the forced removal from Indiana to Kansas. There were 106 sick so two doctors were called in, Drs. Ritchie & son. Sanford Cox later wrote . . . — Map (db m33811) HM
Indiana (Tippecanoe County), Lafayette — Trail of Death — September 12, 1838 — LaGrange - Logansport State Road
In 1838 some 800 Potawatomi Indians, being forcibly removed from Marshall County to Kansas, camped along this road, the LaGrange-Logansport State Road. On this “trail of death”, scores of Native Americans suffered and died. The mother of . . . — Map (db m33812) HM
Indiana (Warren County), State Line City — Trail of Death — Gopher Hill Cemetery
On September 15, 1838, about 860 Potawatomi Indians camped near here on the forced removal from Indiana to Kansas. They had to camp by a dirty stream. Two small children who died on the trek from Williamsport were buried at this camp. — Map (db m32495) HM
Indiana (Warren County), Williamsport — The Trail of Death
In 1838 a band of over 800 Potawatomi Indians were forcibly removed from their homeland in Northern Indiana and marched to Eastern Kansas. Many died along the trail during the two month trek. This mournful caravan traveled this road on September 14, . . . — Map (db m9307) HM
Indiana (Warren County), Williamsport — Trail of Death — Old Town Park - - Williamsport
About 850 Potawatomi Indians camped here near Williamsport September 14, 1838. Two deaths occurred in the evening. Three chiefs were transported in a jail wagon because they refused to leave their beloved homeland in Indiana. — Map (db m32620) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Centerville — [Potawatomi] Trail of Death — Indiana to Kansas
Sept. 4 - Nov. 5, 1838 61 Day March 618 Miles (Map showing path) — Map (db m70608) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Centerville — [Potawatomi] Trail of Death
The removal of the Potawatomi Indians from northern Indiana to Kansas took place Sept. - Nov. 1838. Nearly 900 Indians were rounded up by soldiers and marched at gun point for 61 days. So many died on the way and were buried by the roadside that . . . — Map (db m70609) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Centerville — Father Petit and the Potawatomi 'Trail of Death' — (Indiana to Kansas, September 4 - November 4, 1838)
Rev. Benjamin Marie Petit, of the City of Rennes, France, arrived as the Catholic missionary to the Potawatomi Indians in northern Indiana in November 1837. By June 1838, he had learned much of their difficult language and their culture, and had . . . — Map (db m70652) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Centerville — Father Petit and the Trail of Death
Father Benjamin Marie Petit, a missionary to the Potawatomi in northern Indiana, accompanied them on the forced removal in 1838. He ministered to their needs, both spiritual and physical. He baptized the dying children, "whose first step was . . . — Map (db m70635) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Centerville — Kanza Indian Site?
The rock lined pits in this area pre-date the arrival of the Potawatomi Indians. Theories are that they may have been used for seed or food storage. The rocks here are shaped differently than any other in the area and their origin is uncertain. . . . — Map (db m70575) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Centerville — Potawatomi "Trail of Death" march & death of Fr. Petit
[Map] Designates 1838 'Trail of Death' route from Indiana to present day Osawatomie, Kans. In September 1838 over 850 Potawatomi Indian people were rounded up and marched at gunpoint from their Indiana homeland. Many walked the 600-mile . . . — Map (db m70654) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Centerville — Potawatomi Burial Ground — Memorial
. . . — Map (db m70655) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Centerville — Priests House
Some of the Jesuit priests who lived and served here Fr. Christian Hoecken • Fr. Francis Renaud • Fr. Felix Vanquickenborne • Fr. Peter John Verhaegen • Fr. Peter Desmet • Fr. Fleix [sic] Verreydt • Fr. John Baptist Smedts • Fr. Herman Aelen . . . — Map (db m70638) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Centerville — St. Mary's Mission — St. Philippine Duchesne Memorial Park
Sugar Creek Mission 1839 - 1849 Potawatomi Settlement after a forced march from Northern Indiana A Journey Called "Trail of Death" — Map (db m70574) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Trading Post — Sounds of the byway...moccasins and tears. — Frontier Military Historic Byway
Potawatomi Tribal members were marched from Indiana in 1838 to be relocated on Indian Territory lands. The march was long and arduous. Many Potawatomi, especially children and the elderly, died of illness along the way. Those who survived the . . . — Map (db m33946) HM
Kansas (Miami County), Osawatomie — The Potawatomi Trail of Death — Indiana to Kansas — September 3, 1838 to November 4, 1838
[Map Showing Trail of Death] — Map (db m69323) HM
Kansas (Pottawatomie County), St. Marys — Potawatomi Pay Station & St. Marys Mission
The Native America tribe that is called the Potawatomi originally lived in the heavily forested region of the northern Great Lakes with their close relatives the Ojibwe and Ottawa tribes in what is now the state of Michigan. The rapidly expanding . . . — Map (db m34792) HM
Kansas (Pottawatomie County), St. Marys — 18 — St. Marys
This city and college take their name from St. Mary's Catholic Mission founded here by the Jesuits in 1848 for the Pottawatomie Indians. These missionaries, who had lived with the tribe in eastern Kansas from 1838, accompanied the removal to this . . . — Map (db m34785) HM
Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Wamego — 107 — Vieux Cemetery
Of Pottawatomie Indian and French ancestry, Louis Vieux was an early resident of this area. Probably born near Lake Michigan, Vieux, with a portion of the Pottawatomies, moved to Iowa and later Indianola, Kan., near Topeka. In 1847 or 1848, Vieux . . . — Map (db m32608) HM
Missouri (Lafayette County), Lexington — Trail of Death — Historical Marker

On October 26, 1838 about 800 Potawatomi Indians being forcibly removed from Indiana camped on the river bank opposite Lexington. They ferried the Missouri River on October 27 and were marched on to Northeast Kansas.

This monument is in . . . — Map (db m90921) HM

Missouri (Marion County), Palmyra — Potawatomi Emigration — Trail of Death
Indiana to Kansas 1838 On Oct. 11, 1838, 850 Potawatomi Indians camped at Pleasant Spring near Palmyra on the forced removal from Northern Indiana to Eastern Kansas. They passed through Palmyra at 10 o'clock October 12. That night they camped . . . — Map (db m36351) HM

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