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Manassas Gap Railroad Historical Markers

This Civil War era railroad in Virginia is now a 60 mile Norfolk Southern line that runs from the Lower (Northern) Shenandoah Valley to Manassas.
 
Efe Quality House image, Touch for more information
March 15, 2008
Efe Quality House
Virginia, Fairfax — Efe Quality House
Built 1930 Old Town Fairfax The home was built on top of the Manassas Gap Railway right-of-way which was the railway started before the Civil War. This railway construction was disbanded during the Civil War. The house was renovated in 1992 by Dr. . . . — Map (db m6296) HM
Virginia, Fairfax — Manassas Gap Railroad
Cuts and fills of the Independent Line of the Manassas Gap Railroad are visible along this line and at various places through Fairfax County to Sudley Ford on Bull Run. Running north of the Little River Turnpike from Annandale and along North Street . . . — Map (db m101539) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Annandale — Action At Annandale
The roadbed for the unfinished Manassas Gap Railroad was located in this immediate area and crossed Indian Run creek in Poe Terrace Park. The stone bridge abutments are still visible. Financial problems caused work to stop on the railroad in 1857, . . . — Map (db m33512) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Centreville — Manassas Gap Railroad Independent Line
The roadbed of the Independent Line of the Manassas Gap Railroad ran through this area. Conceived to extend the Manassas Gap Railroad from Gainesville to Alexandria, grading on this part of the line began in September 1854. The nearby stone bridge . . . — Map (db m655) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Fairfax — Manassas Gap Railroad Independent Line
The Independent Line of the Manassas Gap Railroad ran through this area. Conceived to extend the Manassas Gap Railroad to Alexandria, grading on this part of the line began in September 1854. Financial problems stopped the work in May 1857. In . . . — Map (db m528) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Delaplane — B-21 — Delaplane(Formerly Piedmont Station)
On July 19, 1861 Stonewall Jackson’s brigade of General Joseph E. Johnston’s corps marched to this station from Winchester. They crowded into freight and cattle cars and travelled to the 1st Battle of Manassas. The use of a railroad to carry more . . . — Map (db m642) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Delaplane — Piedmont StationBy Train to Manassas — First Manassas Campaign
Here at Piedmont Station (now Delaplane) trains were used for the first time in history to move troops to impending battle. On July 19, 1861 the fields surrounding this stop on the Manassas Gap Railroad—which appeared then almost exactly . . . — Map (db m41648) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Rectortown — RectortownMcClellan’s Demise, Mosby’s Raffle — Mosby's Confederacy
On November 5, 1862, several weeks after a tainted victory at Antietam, the Army of the Potomac's Commander-in-Chief Gen. George Brinton McClellan established his headquarters here. That same day President Abraham Lincoln wrote the orders relieving . . . — Map (db m1173) HM
Virginia (Loudoun County), Purcellville — T 53 — Loudoun Branch, Manassas Gap Railroad
The Virginia General Assembly approved plans for the Loudoun Branch (parts of which survive here) of the Manassas Gap Railroad on 8 March 1853, and construction soon began. The route extended 27 miles from just southwest of Chantilly on the main . . . — Map (db m7278) HM
Virginia, Manassas — CL-5 — Fifth Prince William County Courthouse
The city of Manassas originated in 1852 at the junction of the Manassas Gap and the Orange & Alexandria railroads. During the Civil War the junction’s strategic significance led to two important battles nearby. After the war, as the community grew, . . . — Map (db m778) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Site of Manassas Junction
One mile west was the junction of the Orange and Alexandria and Manassas Gap Railroad lines. The point became known as Manassas Junction. During the Civil War both sides used the area as a supply base. The site of the first depot was probably about . . . — Map (db m700) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas“On to Richmond!”
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2464) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — “The Unfinished Railroad”
These cuts and fills are what remain of the Independent Line of the Manassas Gap Railroad. The Independent Line was constructed in the mid-1850s to connect Gainesville, 5 miles to the west, with Alexandria, 25 miles to the east. After completing the . . . — Map (db m658) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — The Rock FightSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three, August 30, 1862
Yankees were pinned down on the far side of the embankment, only ten yards away. After twenty minutes of continuous shooting, Confederates here were running out of ammunition. Frantically, they searched their dead and wounded comrades for . . . — Map (db m903) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — The Unfinished RailroadAttacks on Jackson’s Line — Second Battle of Manassas, Day Two, August 29, 1862
From the woods ahead came the sound of many men approaching. Out of a fog of musket smoke the enemy appeared, charging with fixed bayonets straight at this position. You are standing behind the Unfinished Railroad, Confederate General Stonewall . . . — Map (db m659) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — The Unfinished Railroad
Stonewall Jackson set up his defensive line along a two mile section of these cuts and fills, which were originally grading for the Independent Line of the Manassas Gap Railroad. The railroad, begun in the 1850’s, ran out of money after the roadbed . . . — Map (db m663) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Wartime Manassas“Fortifications of Immense Strength”
During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2463) HM
Virginia (Shenandoah County), Strasburg — Civil War StrasburgStrategic Intersection
The railroad tracks before you follow the route of the Manassas Gap Railroad, which reached Strasburg from Washington, D.C., in 1854. The line was a vital link between the Shenandoah Valley and eastern markets. Strasburg became strategically . . . — Map (db m2323) HM

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