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El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail Historical Markers

National Park Service designated El Camino Real de los Tejas a National Historic Trail in 2004. During the Spanish colonial period in America royal roads tied far-flung regions with Mexico City. One of these, El Camino Real de los Tejas, was overland route from what is now Mexico, across the Río Grande through Texas, to the Red River Valley in what is now Louisiana. Routes used by Spanish explorers followed established Indian trails and trade routes dating to prehistoric times.
 
U.S. Military Road #11 Marker image, Touch for more information
By Tom Bosse, July 4, 2017
U.S. Military Road #11 Marker
Louisiana (Natchitoches Parish), Grand Ecore — U.S. Military Road #11
Constructed by soldiers of Fort Jesup 1827-1828 Extension of Old San Antonio Trace. Grand Ecore supplanted Natchitoches as a river port as early as 1836. Fortifications of 1861-1865 nearby. Two miles to Fort Selden, est. 1822. . . . — Map (db m106126) HM
Louisiana (Natchitoches Parish), Natchitoches — El Camino RealKing's Highway — Old San Antonio Trace
Traveled by St. Denis in 1714 from Natchitoches to the Rio Grande Natchitoches, the oldest town in La., was established in 1714 — Map (db m69237) HM
Louisiana (Natchitoches Parish), Robeline — El Camino RealKings Highway — Old San Antonio Road
Historical park ¼ mile from here. Site of Los Adaes, once capital of Spanish Texas. Erected by the State of Louisiana and the Daughters of the American Revolution. — Map (db m106137) HM
Louisiana (Natchitoches Parish), Robeline — El Camino Real de los Tejas(Royal Road of the Tejas Indians)
This early road connected the presidio, "Nuestra Senora del Pilar de los Adaes", to the royal authority in Mexico City. An elected representative from Los Adaes traveled 1300 miles to Mexico City where he collected the soldiers' salaries and . . . — Map (db m86807) HM
Louisiana (Natchitoches Parish), Robeline — Los Adaes
Mission founded nearby in 1717 for Adaes Indians by Fra Margil, Franciscan of Zacatecas, who traversed the trail from Panama on foot. French Natchitoches served by missionaries from this easternmost Spanish post. Plaque Dedicated June 1, . . . — Map (db m86805) HM
Louisiana (Sabine Parish), Many — El Camino RealKing's Highway — San Antonio Trace
Sabine River was the western boundary of the neutral strip from 1806 to 1820 Pendleton Crossing Marked by the State of Louisiana and the Daughters of the American Revolution A.D. 1951 — Map (db m30753) HM
Louisiana (Sabine Parish), Many — El Camino RealKings Highway — Old San Antonio Road
Historical park 125 yards from here. …and remaining buildings of old Fort Jesup. Erected by the State of Louisiana and the Daughters of the American Revolution. — Map (db m106139) HM
Louisiana (Terrebonne Parish), Chacahoula — Old Cattle Trail
Route led from Mexico to the Mississippi River at Vacherie. One segment, Bull Run Road, starting at Central, ended at Chacahoula. The trail continued West along ridges to Gibson, Morgan City, the Teche lands. and on to el Camino Real during latter . . . — Map (db m92138) HM
Texas (Atascosa County), Jourdanton — 223 — Atascosa County
As early as 1722 El Camino Real (The King's Highway) from the Rio Grande to San Antonio was well established in this area. The Spanish word "Atascosa," denoting boggy ground that hindered travel, gave region its name. The county was created in 1856 . . . — Map (db m56663) HM
Texas (Austin County), San Felipe — 11707 — Early Roads To San Felipe
During the mid-1820's, When Stephen F. Austin was founding this town, the only roads in the area were wagon ruts or beaten trails marked by notched trees. Within a decade, however, the village of San Felipe, one of the first Anglo settlements in . . . — Map (db m43718) HM
Texas (Bastrop County), Bastrop — 9151 — Early History of the City of Bastrop
Long before white men arrived, this region was inhabited by Tonkawa and Comanche Indians. In 1691 the first Spanish explorers crossed this territory en route to east Texas. From their route, parts of “El Camino Real” (the King's Highway) . . . — Map (db m76149) HM
Texas (Bastrop County), Smithville — Smithville
In 1691 missionaries on the expedition of Don Domingo Teran De Los Rios sighted a lagoon which the Indians called Nenocadda. The lagoon, known today as Shipp's Lake, is on the southern edge of present Smithville. Frederick W. Grasmeyer operated a . . . — Map (db m41902) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — Acequia (Irrigation Ditch)
Acequia or irrigation ditch, part of the original acequia built to supply farms and the Mission San Antonio del Valero. — Map (db m30716) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — Comanche Lookout
At an elevation of 1340 feet, Comanche Hill is the fourth highest point in Bexar County. The hill lies on the southeastern edge of the Edwards Plateau and makes up the western edge of the Blackland Prairie. Throughout history this site has provided . . . — Map (db m60328) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — Founding of the Mission and Origin of Name
The San Antonio de Padua Mission was founded in San Antonio in 1716 by the Franciscan Father, Antonio Olivares, and after merging with the San Francisco Solano Mission in 1718, it was officially founded as the San Antonio de Valero Mission. The . . . — Map (db m9228) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — Mission San José / La Misión de San José
"It is truthfully the best of the Americas, and not in the like of the others; nor in all the frontier does the King have an outpost better constructed and easier to defend..." Fr. Juan Agustín de Morfi, 1777-78 Mission San José and its . . . — Map (db m33997) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — 748 — The Casas Reales
On site chosen July 2, 1731, for "government houses" by people of San Fernando de Bexar, including newly-arrived settlers from the Canary Islands. Structure, erected 1742, had to be rebuilt in 1779 by Don Jose Antonio Curbelo, alcalde of the Villa . . . — Map (db m20332) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — The Mission Period1716 - 1793
This region was inhabited by native peoples from early times. Among them were the Payayas, who lived along a river they called Yanaguana. On June 13, 1691, Franciscan Father Damián Massanet arrived and christened the river San Antonio de Padua in . . . — Map (db m31015) HM
Texas (Bexar County), San Antonio — The Mission Road / El Camino de las Misiones
This road linked the mission of San Antonio with each other and with the rest of Texas and Mexico. The Mission Road carried information, supplies and trade goods, and warnings of attack or danger. Some of the travel routes used by residents of the . . . — Map (db m33985) HM
Texas (Brazos County), Bryan — 8706 — Route of El Camino Real(Also known as Old San Antonio Road and Old Spanish Road)
Great thoroughfare of pioneer Texas, stretching 1,000 miles from Saltillo, Mexico, to present Louisiana. The general route followed ancient Indian and buffalo trails, but the oldest marked portion, known as "Trail of the Padres", was blazed in 1691 . . . — Map (db m68683) HM
Texas (Cherokee County), Alto — 6971 — Mound Prairie
Bulging out of the earth a few yards from this point, three prehistoric Indian mounds interrupt the prevailing flat terrain. Long overgrown with grass, the mounds and adjacent village (covering about 100 acres) constitute one of the major aboriginal . . . — Map (db m21202) HM
Texas (Goliad County), Goliad — 4119 — Presidio de Nuestra Señora de Loreto de la Bahía(Fort of Our Lady of Loreto of the Bay)
One of the most historic Spanish forts in Texas. Popularly called Presidio la Bahía, it was founded on Espíritu Santo (present Lavaca) Bay in 1722. Twice moved, it was re-established here in 1749 to protect Espiritu Santo Mission (1/4 mi. NW). In . . . — Map (db m36230) HM
Texas (Goliad County), Goliad — 3409 — Site of the Mission Nuestra Señora del Espiritu Santo de Zúñiga
First established at the site of La Salle's Fort on Garcitas Creek, Victoria County, among the Coco, Cujanes, Karankawa and other Indian tribes in 1722. Moved to Mission Valley, Victoria County, on the Guadalupe River among the Jaranames and . . . — Map (db m68955) HM
Texas (Hays County), San Marcos — Col. Ignacio Elizondo’s 1813 Campaign
In 1813 royalist Lieutenant Colonel Ignacio Elizondo led 500 cavalrymen in pursuit of retreating Mexican and Anglo-American insurrectionists along this road. A hacienda owner in Coahuila, Elizondo initially joined Father Miguel Hidalgo’s . . . — Map (db m69109) HM
Texas (Hays County), San Marcos — 10256 — Don Felipe Roque de la Portilla
At the request of Antonio Cordero, interim governor of the Province of Texas, Spanish-born Felipe Roque de la Portilla (1768?-1841) established a colony here on El Camino Real. With his own family of eight, he brought 51 persons from the interior of . . . — Map (db m68953) HM
Texas (Hays County), San Marcos — El Camino De Nacogdoches
The gulley seen about fifty yards behind this marker originated from ruts in the El Camino Real (the Royal Road) from San Antonio to Nacogdoches. The road actually had two routes through what is now Hays County, and, creating confusion, both had . . . — Map (db m20273) HM
Texas (Hays County), San Marcos — 10293 — McGehee Crossing
The Camino Real, also known as the Old San Antonio Road and the King's Highway, followed a route from Nacogdoches to the Rio Grande. Louis Juchereau de St. Denis (1676-1744) traveled the route to establish trade between the French in Louisiana and . . . — Map (db m76901) HM
Texas (Hays County), San Marcos — 10311 — Post San Marcos
The Republic of Texas Congress in Dec. 1838 called for military roads and forts from Red River to the Nueces. A road from Austin, joining El Camino Real near St. Mark's Springs, was designed for rapid communication between San Antonio and the . . . — Map (db m70967) HM
Texas (Hays County), San Marcos — 10325 — San Marcos Springs
Pouring forth millions of gallons of clear, icy water daily, these springs feed the San Marcos River and the 1,380-square-mile area which it drains. The immense springs rise at the Balcones Escarpment, a geologic fault line which slices across the . . . — Map (db m68778) HM
Texas (Hays County), San Marcos — 10319 — Site of the First Town of San Marcos
Known officially as Villa de San Marcos de Neve. Established in 1807 by Mexican settlers. The population on January 6, 1808 was 81. A flood in 1808 and subsequent Indian raids led to its abandonment in 1812 — Map (db m76023) HM
Texas (Hays County), San Marcos — 10338 — Wonder Cave
In Balcones Fault, created by prehistoric earth shift. Said to have been campsite of Indians and Spaniards, especially priests who planted anaqua trees in area. By legend, robber gangs in 1820s cached Camino Real booty here. Discovered 1893 for . . . — Map (db m53525) HM
Texas (Houston County), Weches — 7013 — Mission San Francisco de Los Tejas
First Spanish Mission in East Texas. Established in 1690 by Franciscan friars to convert the Tejas Indians. "Tejas", a Spanish rendition of the Indian word for "friend", was in time adopted as the state name. The founding party was led by Capt. . . . — Map (db m27145) HM
Texas (Kinney County), Brackettville — 17807 — Las Moras Spring
As the ninth largest springs in Texas and the largest springs in Kinney County, Las Moras Spring is significant due to its location and invaluable natural resources. Moras, meaning “mulberries” in one Spanish translation, refer to . . . — Map (db m78415) HM
Texas (Madison County), Normangee — 9621 — El Camino RealThe Old San Antonio Road
First blazed in 1691 by Captain Don Domingo Teran de Los Rios, first provincial governor of Texas, in an expedition officially directed by Father Fray Damian Massanet O.F.M. apostolic missionary and explorer in Texas. The general route was northeast . . . — Map (db m68680) HM
Texas (Milam County), Rockdale — 17269 — Apache Pass River Crossing
The crossing over the San Xavier (San Gabriel) River in Milam county has been used as a passageway for centuries. Evidence shows that the area has been inhabited by humans for at least 10,000 years. During the eighteenth century, the land was . . . — Map (db m84807) HM
Texas (Milam County), Rockdale — 14050 — Site of Mission San Francisco Xavier de Los Dolores
Established by Franciscan missionaries in 1749 with the hope of civilizing and christianizing the Coco, Mayeye, Orcoquiza, Karankawa, and other tribes of Indians. The martyrdom of Padre José Ganzabal and the circumstances connected therewith caused . . . — Map (db m84661) HM
Texas (Milam County), Rockdale — 7988 — Site of the Mission Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria
Established by Franciscan missionaries in 1749 with the hope of civilizing and christianizing the Coco, Mayeye, Orcoquiza, Karankawa, and other tribes of Indians. The martyrdom of Padre José Ganzabal and the circumstances connected therewith caused . . . — Map (db m84618) HM
Texas (Milam County), Rockdale — 7990 — Site of the Mission San Ildefonso
Established by Franciscan missionaries in 1749 with the hope of civilizing and christianizing the Coco, Mayeye, Orcoquiza, Karankawa, and other tribes of Indians. The martyrdom of Padre José Ganzabal and the circumstances connected therewith caused . . . — Map (db m84617) HM
Texas (Nacogdoches County), Chireno — 9276 — Halfway Inn(Flournoy - Granberry House)
This two-story log dwelling was built on the El Camino Real about 1840 by Samuel Flournoy for his wife Minerva (Wadington) and their family who moved to Texas from Mississippi. They settled in the Chireno area, where they purchased 300 acres. An . . . — Map (db m30833) HM
Texas (Nacogdoches County), Nacogdoches — 9243 — Ancient Mound
Mound Street got its name in the 18th century from mounds which lined it from Main to King Street. These were built by prehistoric Indians. Only this one remains. Pottery from a demolished mound that measured 150 by 75 feet is preserved in Old Stone . . . — Map (db m21252) HM
Texas (Nacogdoches County), Nacogdoches — 9400 — Texas Stagecoaches, C.S.A.
At this site on the historic King's Highway, used since 1691, passengers boarded stagecoaches during the Civil War, 1861-65. Besides this stand, the town had 2 others, to serve 3 stage lines operating here. Wm. Clark had the line to Mt. Pleasant, . . . — Map (db m21431) HM
Texas (Sabine County), Toledo Bend — Texas Louisiana BoundaryKings Highway — Camino Real
Old San Antonio Road Marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Texas A.D. 1918 — Map (db m30770) HM
Texas (Travis County), Austin — 16100 — Approximate Site Reached By the Espinosa-Olivares-Aguirre Expedition
A good will trip made in 1709, when Spain was uneasy about her 190-year-old claim to Texas, (She had closed East Texas missions, then had learned of a French trading visit to Texas, 1707.) Capt. Pedro de Aguirre and 14 soldiers escorted from a . . . — Map (db m82323) HM
Texas (Travis County), Austin — 12689 — Balcones Fault Aids Colonization of Texas
Curving through the center of Texas from Hill County south and west to Uvalde County is the rugged escarpment-fault called Balcones. The abundance of natural resources associated with this geologic formation affected the pattern of colonization in . . . — Map (db m71914) HM
Texas (Travis County), Austin — Santiago del Valle Grant
McKinney Falls State Park lies in the center of an early Texas land grant that originally fell within the empresario contract of Texian hero Ben Milam. Ten leagues of land were transferred in 1832 to Santiago del Valle, who at that time was . . . — Map (db m22270) HM
Texas (Victoria County), Victoria — 6572 — Tonkawa BankVisita of Mission Espiritu Santo
Campsite for Franciscans from Mission Espiritu Santo (La Bahia) bringing Christian teachings to Indians associated with Mission. Tonkawas and other tribes were in locality when first visited by the Spaniards, 1689. Indians were sought as converts . . . — Map (db m75076) HM
Texas (Washington County), Brenham — 8361 — La Bahia Road
One of the first overland routes used by European explorers of Texas, La Bahia Road was originally an east-west Indian trail in southeastern Texas and Louisiana. Earlier it may have been an animal trail. Although not as famous, or long, as El Camino . . . — Map (db m27787) HM
Texas (Wilson County), Floresville — 4866 — Site of Old Town: Lodi
Community in an area known by 1720 as land of the Cayopines, a Coahuiltecan Indian tribe. The site was important to Spanish missions of San Antonio, since here along the river their herds were pastured. For the herdsmen, adobe huts were built. After . . . — Map (db m77421) HM

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