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Georgia Historical Society/Commission Historical Markers

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Pulitzer Prize Winner Caroline Pafford Miller Marker image, Touch for more information
By David Seibert, January 27, 2008
Pulitzer Prize Winner Caroline Pafford Miller Marker
Georgia (Appling County), Baxley — 001-1 — Pulitzer Prize Winner Caroline Pafford Miller
Baxley`s Caroline Pafford Miller (1903-1992) was the first Georgia novelist to be awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Literature. The author was born in Waycross and spent her formative years in the South Georgia wiregrass country. After moving to Baxley . . . — Map (db m10079) HM
Georgia (Atkinson County), Pearson — 002-1 — Atkinson Court House>>>----- >
Atkinson County was created by an act of the Georgia legislature in 1917, out of lands previously in Clinch and Coffee Counties. The county was organized Jan. 1, 1918. The first officers were J.W. Roberts, Ordinary; Wiley M. Sumner, Clerk . . . — Map (db m106274) HM
Georgia (Atkinson County), Pearson — 002-2 — Kinnaird Trail
Kinnaird Trail, considered the oldest public road in Wiregrass Georgia, follows an Indian trail used before white men came to this country. In Revolutionary days, it was named Kinnaird Trail as the route was used by Indians and traders travelling . . . — Map (db m26019) HM
Georgia (Atkinson County), Pearson — 002-3 — Minnie F. Corbitt Memorial Museum>>>----- >
Here, about 1873, on Lot No. 1, S.J. Henderson built the first residence in Pearson, then the terminus of the Brunswick and Albany R. R. Successively the home of prominent families in early Pearson history, in 1905 it became the residence of Martin . . . — Map (db m53174) HM
Georgia (Bacon County), Alma — 003-1 — Bacon County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature July 27, 1914, is named for Augustus O. Bacon, four times U.S. Senator, who died in office Feb. 15, 1914. An expert on Mexican affairs, his death was a great loss coming at a time of critical relations . . . — Map (db m24292) HM
Georgia (Baker County), Newton — 004-1 — Baker County
This County, created by Acts of the Legislature Dec. 12 & 24, 1825, is named for Col. John Baker of Revolutionary fame. The original County Site was at Byron but an Act of Dec. 26, 1831, established a new Site which was named Newton for Sgt. John . . . — Map (db m26981) HM
Georgia (Baker County), Newton — 004-2 — Battle of Chickasawachee Swamp
Near here in Chickasawachee Swamp a decisive battle of the Southern Indian Wars was fought July 3, 1836. About 300 warriors were entrenched on an island in the swamp, after a raid in which they killed several settlers. A force of militia under . . . — Map (db m26959) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-10 — Birthplace of Charles Holmes Herty(1867-1938)
Charles Holmes Herty, one of America’s outstanding chemists, was born on this site December 4, 1867. He spent his early life in Milledgeville where he attended the Middle Georgia Agricultural and Military College (now Georgia College). Later he . . . — Map (db m36294) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-1 — Brown-Stetson-Sanford House
This Milledgeville Federal-style house was built c. 1825 on North Wilkinson Street for George T. Brown by English-born builder-architect John Marlor. It was operated as the U.S. Hotel and then the Beecher-Brown Hotel to serve visitors and . . . — Map (db m13141) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-14 — Campsite of Union Army<------<<<<
The Union Army of 65,000 men under the command of General Wm. T. Sherman left Atlanta on November 15, 1864. Only the left wing of 30,000 men entered Milledgeville. The advance units arrived here on the 22nd. The right wing marched via Clinton and . . . — Map (db m35995) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-28 — Cemetery Square
This square was reserved for public use in the city's original survey and became the site of early church buildings. One hundred yards south of this point is a stone marking the site of the first Methodist Church erected in Georgia west of the . . . — Map (db m53076) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-12 — Cobb's Quarter, Sherman's Campsite
Marching toward Milledgeville via Covington, Shady Dale and Eatonton Factory, the Union Army's 14th Corps reached this crossroad on the night of November 22, 1864. General Sherman camped at the Howell Cobb place, a few yards north of this point. . . . — Map (db m13136) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-30 — De Soto in Georgia
In May 1539 Hernando de Soto landed in Florida with over 600 people, 220 horses and mules, and a herd reserved for famine. Fired by his success in Pizarro's conquest of Peru, De Soto had been granted the rights, by the King of Spain, to explore, . . . — Map (db m27275) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-3 — Flannery O'Connor's Andalusia Farm
Andalusia was the home of writer Flannery O’Connor from 1951 until her death in 1964. Born in Savannah in 1925, O’Connor and her family moved to Milledgeville in 1940. O’Connor left Georgia for a time, but returned to Milledgeville in 1951 after . . . — Map (db m8982) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-23 — Fort Wilkinson
Three hundred yards east of this point stood Ft. Wilkinson, established in 1797 on Georgia's Indian boundary. Garrisoned by soldiers whose families lived outside the stockade, it was an early trading house where Creek Indians were provided . . . — Map (db m13140) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-4 — Georgia's Secession Convention
On January 16, 1861, the Georgia Secession Convention met here to consider seceding from the United States. Secession began in response to Abraham Lincoln's election as president the previous November and the belief that his Republican party was . . . — Map (db m42603) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-17 — Howell Cobb Plantation
Site of the large Baldwin County plantation of Howell Cobb, one of the 'Great Georgia Triumvirate' of Stephens, Toombs and Cobb, and his wife, the former Mary Ann Lamar. Born at Cherry Hill in Jefferson County, Georgia Sept. 7, 1815, he graduated . . . — Map (db m13137) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-13 — Junction of 20th and 14th Corps
With the right wing of his army in the vicinity of Clinton and Macon, General Sherman, with the left wing, appeared at this point on November 23, 1864. The left wing, consisting of the 20th and 14th corps, was comprised of 30,000 men, 12,000 horses . . . — Map (db m35832) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-24 — Milledgeville State Hospital
In 1837, largely through the influence of Tomlinson Fort and William A. White, the legislature appropriated $20,000 for a dormitory near Milledgeville where the state’s mentally ill could receive custodial care. A four-story building was opened on . . . — Map (db m13135) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-7 — Montpelier<------<<<<
This church is named Montpelier after Fort Montpelier of 1794, 1/2 mi. below here down the Oconee. This fort & others were built during the Creek Indian troubles. Capt. Jonas Fouche was ordered to guard the Ga. frontier from the mouth of the Tugaloo . . . — Map (db m36103) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-5 — Old Fort Fidius>>>-- 1793-1797 -->
The first settlement in this section was made up of four frame houses, a dozen or more cabins and a fort. It was called Federal town. Many of the soldiers died so a new fort was built several miles up the river and named Fort Fidius. It was located . . . — Map (db m36323) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-1B — Old Governor’s Mansion
Completed in 1838, The Executive Mansion was the fifth and last resident occupied by Georgia governors when Milledgeville was the capital of Georgia. The Palladian-inspired structure is considered one of the most perfect examples of Georgian . . . — Map (db m36124) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-21 — Old Oglethorpe University
This is the site of the antebellum college established in the community of Midway by the Hopewell Presbytery in 1833. Its first president, Carlisle P. Beman, was succeded by Samuel K. Talmage. In 1861, students and faculty entered Confederate . . . — Map (db m10803) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-1A — Old State Capitol>>>>--- 2 Blocks --->
A reproduction of Georgia’s State Capitol 1807-1867 stands on the original site. Wings to the main building were added in 1828 and 1837. Here the Secession Convention met Jan. 16, 1861 and after three days of bitter debate passed the secession act. . . . — Map (db m36405) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-16 — Provost Guard Campsite
The 3rd Wisconsin and the 107th New York Regiments, having been detailed for provost duty, encamped on this square, November 22-25, 1864. The State Arsenal on the north side of the square was burned. The magazine, which stood on the opposite side, . . . — Map (db m13139) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-11 — Route of the Twentieth Corps
On the morning of Nov. 23, 1864, the main body of the 20th Corps of the Union Army, commanded by Gen. A. S. Williams, reached Milledgeville from Eatonton. The Corps marched down Jackson Street to this point where companies were formed into line. . . . — Map (db m35712) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-26 — Sacred Heart Catholic Church
The first Catholic mass was celebrated at Milledgeville in April, 1845, at the Hugh Treanor apartment in the Newell Hotel. Bishop Ignatius Reynolds of the diocese of Charleston, accompanied by Father J. F. O’Neill, visited here in 1847. In 1850 this . . . — Map (db m36357) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-8 — St. Stephens Episcopal Church
This Church was organized in 1841 through the efforts of Bishop Stephen Elliott. The church building was completed in 1843 and consecrated Dec. 10. The vestibule, annex and Gothic roof were added later. The handmade chancel furniture was given by an . . . — Map (db m36104) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-29 — State College
Largely through the efforts of William Y. Atkinson the Georgia Normal and Industrial College was founded in 1889 with J. Harris Chappell as the first president. It became a degree-granting institution in 1917 and included a liberal arts program. The . . . — Map (db m36361) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-19 — Statehouse Square
On this tract of twenty acres was built the Statehouse, the original wing of which was completed in 1811. Later additions were made until 1835 when it was finished in its present form. Near the Statehouse stood the Arsenal and the Magazine, brick . . . — Map (db m36404) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-20 — The Great Seal of Georgia»—→
When Federal troops entered Milledgeville in November, 1864, Georgia Secretary of State Nathan C. Barnett hid the Great Seal under a house and the legislative minutes in a pig pen 30 yards east of this point. Later they were returned to the . . . — Map (db m36358) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-18 — The March to the Sea
On Nov. 15, 1864, after destroying Atlanta and cutting his communications with the North, Maj. Gen. W.T. Sherman, USA, began his destructive campaign for Savannah -- the March to the Sea. He divided his army [US] into two wings. The Right Wing (15th . . . — Map (db m35533) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-2 — The Milledgeville Hotel and Oliver Hardy
On this corner stood the Milledgeville Hotel built in 1858 while Milledgeville served as Georgia's capital. In 1903 Emily Norvell Hardy took over management of the hotel. She moved into the hotel with her two youngest children, including . . . — Map (db m15373) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-22 — The Rock Landing>>>------>
Five miles south of this point is the Rock Landing at the head of navigation on the Oconee River and at the junction of the old Indian trading paths leading westward. In 1789 Pres. Washington sent Gen. Benjamin Lincoln here to treat with Chief . . . — Map (db m36326) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-25 — Tomlinson Fort House
At this site lived Tomlinson Fort (1787-1859). A leader of the Union Party, he studied medicine and wrote a widely used book on medical practice. A captain in the War of 1812, he served in the Georgia legislature and the U.S. Congress, and on the . . . — Map (db m36134) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-27 — Troup-Clark Political Feud
In the street near this site in June 1807, occurred the horse-whipping of Superior Court Judge Charles Tait by his political enemy John Clark, later Governor of Georgia. Clark was fined $2,000 for the assault. The incident illustrates Georgia . . . — Map (db m36362) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Scottsboro — 005-4 — John Clark House
This house, now the Du Bignon home, was once the home of John Clark, Governor of Georgia. At the age of 16, John Clark fought with his father, General Elijah Clark, distinguished Revolutionary soldier, at the decisive Battle of Kettle Creek. . . . — Map (db m13138) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Scottsboro — 005-15 — Route of Gen. Kilpatrick’s Cavalry
Gen. Sherman’s Cavalry Corps, commanded by Gen. Judson Kilpatrick, consisted of 5,000 men, 8,000 animals, and 300 wagons. It rode from Gordon to Milledgeville on Nov. 24 to join the left wing of the Union Army. On the 25th, Gen. Kilpatrick moved . . . — Map (db m42314) HM
Georgia (Banks County), Alto — 006-3 — Line Baptist Church
The Line Baptist Church was constituted Sept. 13, 1802, by Rev. Moses Sanders, Thomas Maxwell and Daniel White. This church was just over the line between Georgia and Cherokee lands. Meetings couldn’t be held at night, because all white people . . . — Map (db m40651) HM
Georgia (Banks County), Baldwin — 006-2 — “Hawkins Line”
This line, sometimes called “The Four Mile Purchase Line” was the boundary between Georgia and the Cherokee Nation from 1804 to 1818. It was established when Georgia bought a four mile strip from the Indians so as to take in Wofford’s . . . — Map (db m40642) HM
Georgia (Banks County), Baldwin — 006-3B — Battle of Narrows>>>------>
This battle was fought Oct. 12, 1864 between Confederate troops and Union cavalry in the nearby mountain pass. A Confederate victory saved Habersham county from pilaging by Union troops and camp followers and also saved grain fields for . . . — Map (db m40640) HM
Georgia (Banks County), Baldwin — 006-6 — Leatherwood Baptist Church
Leatherwood Baptist Church was established in 1801 at Eastanollee in Franklin County. Many members moved near here, organized this church and named it Leatherwood. Members remaining in Eastanollee reorganized and named their church Eastanollee. Land . . . — Map (db m40703) HM
Georgia (Banks County), Homer — 006-7B — Banks County
Banks County was created by Act of Dec. 11, 1858 from Franklin and Habersham Counties. It was named for Dr. Richard Banks (1784-1850), whose reputation as physician and surgeon extended over north Ga. and S.C. Especially noted for treating Indians . . . — Map (db m40684) HM
Georgia (Banks County), Homer — 006-1 — Indian Boundary
The boundary between the State of Georgia and the Cherokee Nation established by the Treaty of Augusta, May 31, 1783, ran along here. The line ran “from the top of Currahee mountain to the head, or source, of the most southern branch of the . . . — Map (db m40659) HM
Georgia (Banks County), Homer — 006-7 — Mt. Pleasant Church
In 1780 a group of people, Garrisons and Wilmonts, met on the top of the hill behind the church, built a platform between two trees, and held a religious meeting. This small gathering, and the statement that it was pleasant to worship on the . . . — Map (db m16995) HM
Georgia (Banks County), Homer — 006-5 — Nails Creek Baptist Church
Nails Creek Baptist Church, the first Baptist Church in Banks County, was established February 11, 1787. It was the Mother Church of Middle River, Grove Level and Indian Creek. Many descendants of its charter members are active in the work of the . . . — Map (db m14473) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Winder — 007-2 — Barrow County
Barrow County was created by Act of July 7, 1914 from Gwinnett, Jackson and Walton Counties. It was named for David Crenshaw Barrow, Chancellor of the University of Georgia for many years. Born in Oglethorpe County, October 18, 1852, he died in . . . — Map (db m19070) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Winder — 007-3 — Battle of King's Tanyard
On July 31, 1864, at the Battle of Sunshine Church (19 miles NE of Macon), Maj. Gen. Geo. Stoneman [US] surrendered with 600 men to Brig. Gen. Alfred Iverson, Jr., [CS], after covering the escape of Adams’ and Capron’s brigades of his cavalry . . . — Map (db m23454) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Winder — 007-1 — Fort Yargo<------<<<<
This remarkably preserved log blockhouse was built in 1793, according to historians. There are several references to Fort Yargo as existing prior to 1800. Its location is given as three miles southwest of “Jug Tavern,” original name for . . . — Map (db m22396) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Winder — 7-1 — Glenwood Elementary and High School
Glenwood Elementary and High School was established in 1951 as one of Georgia’s first public consolidated schools for African Americans. Part of a statewide equalization effort to improve school buildings and preserve segregation, Glenwood became . . . — Map (db m56487) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Winder — 007-4 — The Stoneman Raid Battle of King's Tanyard
Closing in on Atlanta in July, 1864, Maj. Gen. W.T. Sherman found it "too strong to assault and too extensive to invest." To force its evacuation, he sent Maj. Gen. Geo. Stoneman's cavalry [US] to cut the Macon railway by which its defenders were . . . — Map (db m17307) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Adairsville — 008-30 — Barnsley’s
A unique, ante-bellum plantation, established by Godfrey Barnsley in the 1850’s. Maj. Gen. J. B. McPherson’s H’dq’rs. [US], May 18, 1864. K. Garrard’s cav. [US], via Hermitage, arrived at noon. A detachment (Minty’s brigade) sent S. . . . — Map (db m40812) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Adairsville — 008-28 — Federal Armies at Adairsville
May 18, 1864, The 4th, 14th & 20th Corps (Army of the Cumberland) [US] together with the 15th &16th corps (Army of the Tennessee) [US] reached Adairsville from Resaca, at noon. Sherman convinced that all of Johnston´s forces had gone to Kingston & . . . — Map (db m13235) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Adairsville — 008-48 — Historic Trimble House<—2 mi.—<
About 2 miles N. is the plantation home of Augustus Crawford Trimble, pioneer settler, member of the Home Guard, and businessman of Adairsville. A son, serving in the 1st Georgia Cavalry under Gen. Joe Wheeler, engaged the enemy on the plantation. . . . — Map (db m12419) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Adairsville — 008-27 — Johnston's Army at Adairsville
May 18, 1864. The three corps of the Confederate Army, on reaching Adairsville from Resaca, moved by two roads to Cassville. Hood´s & Polk´s corps marched S. on old U.S.41 Highway: Hardee´s corps took direct road to Kingston W. & parallel to the . . . — Map (db m13233) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Adairsville — 008-29 — McPherson’s Troops March to Barnsley’s
May 18th, 1864. Logan’s 15th A.C. of the Army of the Tennessee [US] left Adairsville in afternoon, following the 4th & 14th A.C. [US] as far as this point, where it turned S.W. to Barnsley Gardens, where it joined K. Garrard’s Cavalry [US]. . . . — Map (db m40466) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Adairsville — 008-2 — Mosteller's Mills
Five miles NE on State Highway 140 - a notable plantation and manufacturing center of the 1860´s. The Federal 23rd Corps, left wing of Sherman´s forces [US] marching southward from Resaca, having crossed at Field´s Mill, Coosawattee River, enroute . . . — Map (db m13231) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Adairsville — 008-1 — Original Site Adairsville — 1830’s
May 17, 1864, Johnston’s forces (CSA) retreated S. From Resaca and paused here on an E. - W. line, the intention being to make a stand against the Federals in close pursuit. Finding the position untenable due to width of Oothcaloga Valley, Johnston . . . — Map (db m87049) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Allatoona — 008-44 — Allatoona Pass
Allatoona was in pioneer days a travel hub, because ridges from east and south met here where it was fairly easy to cross the Allatoona Mountain range by winding over a low ridge, or pass. The Sandtown or Tennessee Road from the south, and the . . . — Map (db m13843) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Atco — 008-3 — Pettit CreekCamp Site, Federal 23d Corps.
Johnston’s forces [CS] retreated southward from Cassville along this road, to Allatoona Mountains, south of the Etowah, May 20, 1864. They were immediately followed by Schofield’s 23d Corps, [US] which encamped in this vicinity. While here, troops . . . — Map (db m21679) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-43 — Bartow County
Originally Cass, Bartow County was created by Act of Dec. 3, 1832 from Cherokee County. The name was changed Dec. 6, 1861 to honor Gen. Francis S. Bartow (1816-1861), Confederate political leader and soldier, who fell mortally wounded at the First . . . — Map (db m40585) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-41 — Battle of Allatoona
After the fall of Atlanta, hoping Sherman would follow, Hood moved his Confederate army north, sending French’s Division to fill the railroad cut at Allatoona, and burn the railroad bridge over the Etowah River, to hamper Sherman’s movement. . . . — Map (db m21843) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-54 — Etowah (Tumlin) Mounds
For over 100 years Etowah Indian Mounds were the Tumlin Mounds. In 1832 Col. Lewis Tumlin came to Cass County (Bartow) and drew the land lot that contained the mounds. Col. Tumlin served as county sheriff from 1834 to 1840. As young soldiers, Gen. . . . — Map (db m13471) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-47 — Etowah and the War
The Confederacy sought iron and munitions eagerly, which quickly brought prosperity to Etowah. Patriotic key workers, though exempt from army duty, enlisted, and loss of their skill hampered production. Mark Cooper sold the works in 1862. In the . . . — Map (db m56318) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-45 — Federal Fort
Atop the hill to the east was a fort that protected the river bridge, part of the rail line which enabled Sherman to supply his army during the Atlanta Campaign. The rail line has been moved downstream, but piers in the river mark the site of the . . . — Map (db m10894) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-14 — Felton Home
Dr. William H. Felton and his wife, Rebecca Latimer, lived from 1853 until 1905 in the house east of this marker. A physician, minister and noted orator, Dr. Felton was the leader of the Independent Revolt from the State Democratic Party in the . . . — Map (db m13483) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-51 — Friendship Monument
The nearby marble shaft has the unique distinction of having been erected by a debtor in honor of his creditors. Losses during the panic of 1857 forced Mark A. Cooper, proprietor of the Etowah Iron Works, to offer this property for sale to satisfy a . . . — Map (db m11627) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-50 — Mark Anthony Cooper's Iron Works
These ruins of an old iron furnace built by Moses Stroup are all that remain of Cooper's Iron Works, developed by Mark Anthony Cooper, pioneer industrialist, politician, and farmer. Cooper was born in 1800 near Powelton, Ga. Graduating from S.C. . . . — Map (db m56319) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 003-8 — Milam's Bridge
The covered structure over the Etowah here, was burned by Jackson´s [CS] Cav. May 21, 1864, the day after Johnston´s [CS] passage of the river at State R.R. Bridge. May 23rd, the 2 pontoon bridges intended for the passage of Schofield´s 23d A.C. . . . — Map (db m13840) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-25 — Raccoon Creek
Geary´s (2d) Div., 20th A.C. [US], having crossed the Etowah, May 23, drove Ross´ cavalry [CS] beyond the creek, May 24, 1864. This covered the march of the rest of the corps S. to Burnt Hickory P.O., in which Geary´s troops joined - being relieved . . . — Map (db m13946) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-12B — Site of Sam Jones' Tabernacle
For 20 years, thousands came annually to this site, attracted by the magnetic personality and forceful eloquence of Sam Jones, renowned Evangelist and Christian crusader. Here he built, in 1886, at his own expense, a large open-air structure, . . . — Map (db m40571) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-20 — Confederate Army of Tenn. at Cassville
Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s forces [CS], reaching Cassville May 18, 1864 from Resaca, 30 m. N., took positions on ridge W. of the town & prepared to withstand the advancing Federals. May 19th: Pursuant to this intention, Hood´s corps [CS] moved N. . . . — Map (db m13940) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-39B — Confederate Dead
In this cemetery are buried about 300 unknown Confederate soldiers who died of wounds or disease in the several Confederate hospitals located in Cassville. These hospitals operated from late 1861 until May 18, 1864, then moved south out of the path . . . — Map (db m13978) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-23 — Confederate Line5 P.M. May 19, 1864
The three corps of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s Army [CS] were withdrawn from N. & W. of Cassville to this ridge, E. & S. of the town. Hardee was posted astride the R.R. near Cass Station on the S.; Polk centered here & Hood’s line skirted the . . . — Map (db m30561) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-38 — Gen. Leonidas Polk's Headquarters
The William Neal McKelvey residence - 1864. A Council of War held here May 19, discussed the advisability of holding the position E. & S. of Cassville by the Confederate army. Present were: Gen. Joseph E. Johnston; Lt. Gen. Polk; Lt. Gen. John B. . . . — Map (db m15457) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-40 — Grave of Gen. William Tatum Wofford
Gen. William Tatum Wofford (June 28, 1824 - May 22, 1884), Cav. Capt. in the Mexican War, Col. and Brig. Gen. in the Confederate Army, is buried here. After Fredericksburg he succeeded to the command of Gen. Thomas R. R. Cobb, who was mortally . . . — Map (db m30569) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-19 — Gravelly Plateau & Two Run Creek
May 19, 1864: Butterfield´s (3d) Div., 20th A.C. [US], moving S.E., from McDow´s, left the road here & marched to the Hawkins Price house, enroute to Kingston. The 1st & 2nd Divs. [US], on roads W., had the same objective - an erratic move by . . . — Map (db m13929) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-21 — Site - Cassville Female College
A large brick structure erected 1853. May 19, 1864: Skirmishers of Polk´s A.C. [CS] withdrew from this ridge E. to Cassville when pressed back by Butterfield´s (3d) Div., 20th A.C. [US], from the Hawkins Price house. Battery C, 1st Ohio Lt. Art., . . . — Map (db m13941) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-22 — Site - Cherokee Baptist College
On Chapman Hill; a school for boys established Jan. 1854. A large three-story brick bldg. flanked by two-story wings. Burned 1856; rebuilt 1857, destroyed by Federal forces Oct. 12, 1864. This, & the Methodist Female College 3/4 mi. N.E., were the . . . — Map (db m13942) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-17 — Town Of Cassville
In this valley was once situated the proud town of Cassville, begun in July 1833, as the seat of justice for Cass County and soon the center of trade and travel in the region recently comprising the Cherokee Nation. Both the county and town where . . . — Map (db m12371) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Emerson — 008-5 — Battle of AllatoonaOctober 5, 1864
Lt. Gen. John B. Hood, Army of Tenn. [CS], while enroute N. from Palmetto, Ga., sent Lt. Gen. A.P. Stewart´s Corps to destroy the State R.R. from Big Shanty to the Etowah River. Stewart seized Big Shanty and Acworth on the 3d, and French´s Div. was . . . — Map (db m13935) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Emerson — 008-6 — Battle of AllatoonaOctober 5, 1864
After artillery firing and repeated assaults by French´s troops, [CS] the Federals made a final stand in the star fort W. of rock cut. Failing to dislodge the defenders, French retreated to New Hope Church in Paulding County. French´s division . . . — Map (db m13936) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Emerson — 008-4 — Emerson
Named for Joseph Emerson Brown, Gov. of Ga., 1857-1865, U.S. Senator, 1880-1891. Known as Stegall`s Station prior to 1889; site of the Bartow Iron Works. May 20, 1864: Gen. Joseph E. Johnston`s forces camped here after retreating from Cassville and . . . — Map (db m10907) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Emerson — 008-7 — Railroad Block-house
On Allatoona Creek in this vicinity, a Federal block-house, guarding State R.R. bridge, was garrisoned by Companies E, F, and I, of the 18th Wisconsin Regt. Oct. 5, 1864, while retreating from Allatoona, 2 mi. N., French’s Div. of Stewart’s A.C. . . . — Map (db m105104) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Euharlee — 8-1 — Euharlee Creek Covered Bridge
In 1886 the county contracted with Washington W. King, son of freed slave and noted bridge builder Horace King, and Jonathan H. Burke for the construction of this 138-foot bridge. It was adjacent to a mill owned by Daniel Lowry, of which the . . . — Map (db m8478) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-31 — 4th & 14th A.C. March to Kingston
May 18, 1864. Howard’s 4th Corps leading, & two divs. of Palmer’s 14th [US], moved from Adairsville on this direct road to Kingston. They were halted just outside of Adairsville to await the support of the 15th A. C. of McPherson’s Army of the . . . — Map (db m40581) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-39 — Confederate Memorial Day
First Decoration, or Memorial Day, was observed in Kingston in late April of 1865, and has been a continuous observance here since that day, the only such record held by any community in this Nation. The first Memorial, or Decoration Day, was . . . — Map (db m13976) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-37 — Hardee's Corps at Kingston
May 18, 1864. Lt. Gen. Wm. J. Hardee´s A. C. marched from Adairsville on the road parallel to the State R.R. -- turning E. on this rd. to join Polk´s & Hood´s corps [CS] at Cassville, which had moved on the direct Adairsville - Cassville road. . . . — Map (db m13962) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-8 — Historic Price House
2.5 mi. N.E. is the antebellum house of Col. Hawkins F. Price; State Senator 1857-1865; Mem. Ga. Secession Convention. A landmark of military operations near Cassville, where both Gen. Daniel Butterfield & Gen. Hooker (20th A.C.) [US] had . . . — Map (db m13497) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-35 — House - Site Thomas V. B. Hargis
Maj. Gen. W.T. Sherman´s Headquarters May 19-23, 1864 Sherman [US] occupied the Hargis house for three days of reorganization of forces in the campaign that ended at Atlanta. Assuming the Johnston´s army [CS] had moved, from Adairsville, . . . — Map (db m13965) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-49 — Kingston Methodist Church
The original church, with another name and at another location, was built in 1845, rebuilt in Kingston in 1854, and dedicated by Rev. Lovick Pierce, a leading preacher of the nation and father of Bishop George F. Pierce. The only church remaining . . . — Map (db m13537) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-12A — Old Macedonia Church Organized 1847
In 1864, a road southward from Wooley´s Bridge (Etowah River) crossed the road near this point and ran to Van Wert (Rockmart) and Dallas. This was the route of McPherson´s Army of the Tennessee (15th and 16th Corps.), [US] right wing of forces . . . — Map (db m13926) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-32 — Spring Bank
Ante-bellum plantation and residence of the Rev. Charles Wallace Howard, where he established a private school. May 18, 1864. Hardee´s A.C. [CS] moved from Adairsville to Kingston on this road enroute to Cass Station. May 19, the 4th and 14th A.C. . . . — Map (db m13195) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-36 — Surrender of Confederate Troops
May 12, 1865 Brig. Gen. Wm. T. Wofford [CS] arranged with Brig. Gen. Henry M. Judah, U.S.A. for the surrender of some 3000 to 4000 Confederate soldiers, mostly Georgians, not paroled in Virginia, N. Carolina, and elsewhere. During final . . . — Map (db m13967) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-34 — The Andrews Raiders at Kingston
Apr. 12, 1862. James J. Andrews with 18 Ohio soldiers [US] in disguise, & 1 civilian, having seized the locomotive "GENERAL" at Big Shanty (KENNESAW) intending to wreck the State R.R., were forced to side track here & . . . — Map (db m13963) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-33 — The Federal Army at Kingston
May 19, 1864. The 4th, followed by the 14th A.C. [US] reached Kingston, 8 a.m. The 4th turned E. to Cassville; a div. of the 14th sent to Gillem´s bridge, Etowah River, finding no retreating Confederates, Johnston´s forces [CS] were at Cassville, . . . — Map (db m13961) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-40 — Unknown Confederate Dead
Here sleep, known but to God, 250 Confederate and two Federal soldiers, most of whom died of wounds, disease and sickness in the Confederate hospitals located here - 1862-1864. These men were wounded in the battles of Perryville, Chickamauga, . . . — Map (db m13980) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-11 — Woolley's Bridge
In 1864, this covered structure spanned the Etowah River on the plantation of Andrew F. Woolley, 0.5 mi. S. Next to the river was the Rome - Kingston R.R. discontinued, 1943. May 19, McPherson´s Army of the Tenn. (15th & 16th Corps) [US] arched . . . — Map (db m13925) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Pine Log — 008-13 — Corra Harris
Author of "A Circuit Rider´s Wife" and many other books and articles, lived from 1913 until her death in 1935. The most productive years of her career were spent in a picturesque log cabin, which, according to legend, was once the home of a Cherokee . . . — Map (db m13230) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Taylorsville — 008-24 — The Army of the Cumberland at Stilesboro
May 23-24, 1864: The 4th, 20th & two divisions of the 14th corps [US] converged here, from Etowah River crossings at Island Ford, Gillem’s & Milam’s bridges, & moved S.E. up the valley of Raccoon Cr. to Burnt Hickory P.O. (Huntsville). The . . . — Map (db m46621) HM
Georgia (Ben Hill County), Fitzgerald — 009-2 — Ben Hill County
Ben Hill County, created by Act of July 31, 1906 from Irwin and Wilcox Counties, was named for Benjamin Harvey Hill (1823-1882), “one of America’s greatest orators.” A staunch supporter of the administration in the Confederate Senate, . . . — Map (db m40263) HM
Georgia (Ben Hill County), Fitzgerald — 009-4 — FitzgeraldThe Colony City
Founded at Swan in 1895 by Mr. Philander H. Fitzgerald, lawyer, veteran and publisher of the AMERICAN TRIBUNE of Indianapolis, as a soldiers’ colony in the South. Fitzgerald was settled by Union veterans who, tired of Northern winters, flocked from . . . — Map (db m40377) HM
Georgia (Ben Hill County), Fitzgerald — 009-1 — Gen. Bush's Home←——«
This was the home of General William Jordan Bush, last survivor of the 125,000 heroes from Georgia who fought for the South. Gen. Bush was born near Gordon, Ga. July 10, 1845, and died here Nov. 11, 1952. In the War Between the States he was a . . . — Map (db m40168) HM
Georgia (Ben Hill County), Fitzgerald — 009-3 — Jefferson Davis Memorial State Park
On May 4, 1865, Jefferson Davis arrived in Washington, Georgia (178 miles NE of the Park), where he performed his last duties as President of the Confederate States of America. Shortly thereafter, with a small staff and escort, he departed enroute . . . — Map (db m40378) HM
Georgia (Ben Hill County), Fitzgerald — 077-8 — Ozias Church Bethlehem Church
Ozias Primitive Baptist Church was constituted July 14, 1832. Elders Wilson Conner and John Martial were the Presbytery. Members were John McDonald, Randall McDonald, Elijah Hunter, Penelope Hunter, Catherine McCall, Mary McDonald, Elizabeth . . . — Map (db m57153) HM
Georgia (Berrien County), Nashville — 010-3 — Berrien County
Berrien County, created by Act of Feb. 25, 1856, was named for John MacPherson Berrien, “the American Cicero,” who was born Aug. 23, 1781 and died Jan. 1, 1856. He was Judge of the Eastern Circuit, U.S. Senator and U.S. Attorney General. . . . — Map (db m40122) HM
Georgia (Berrien County), Nashville — 010-1 — Flat Creek Mills
Flat Creek Mills was a trading Post and election precinct many years before the present Berrien County was created in 1856. Officers of the new county were sworn in here, and there being no court house, the first Inferior Court was held here in the . . . — Map (db m50534) HM
Georgia (Berrien County), Nashville — 010-4 — Indian Fights
In the summer of 1836, a company of militia under Capt. Levi J. Knight of near Ray City was sent to protect the settlers from marauding Indians on their way to join the Seminoles in Florida. When a party of Indians plundered the plantation of . . . — Map (db m40123) HM
Georgia (Berrien County), Nashville — 010-2 — Old Coffee Road
The Old Coffee Road, earliest vehicular and postal route of this section, running southwestward from the Ocmulgee River to the Florida Line, passed through today’s Lax, Nashville, Cecil, Barwick and Thomasville. The thoroughfare was opened by . . . — Map (db m40124) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-10 — Alfred Holt Colquitt
Governor of Georgia (1877-1882), U.S. Congressman (1853-1855), U.S. Senator (1883-1894), Major U.S. Army in the Mexican War, Brigadier-General in the Confederate Army, Alfred Holt Colquitt is buried here. Born in Walton County, Georgia, April 20, . . . — Map (db m25393) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 11-3 — Ballard-Hudson Senior High School
Ballard-Hudson Senior High School was built in 1949 as the only high school in Macon for African Americans in grades nine through twelve. The school represents the merger of two schools: Ballard High School, a private school with roots in Lewis . . . — Map (db m38198) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-5 — Battles of Dunlap Farm
On July 30, 1864, Gen. Stoneman with 2,500 cavalry crossed Walnut Creek & placed his cannon on a ridge on the Dunlap farm. He attacked Macon to capture the gold in the Confederate Depository; to destroy the Armory, Arsenal & Laboratories, the . . . — Map (db m98661) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-9 — Bibb County
Bibb County was created by Act of Dec. 9, 1822 from Houston, Jones, Monroe and Twiggs Counties. It was named for Dr. William Wyatt Bibb (1781-1820) of Elbert County. Dr. Bibb, physician, legislator, Congressman, Senator, was appointed Governor of . . . — Map (db m44892) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-6 — Birthplace of Sidney Lanier
Sidney Lanier, poet, linguist, musician, mathematician & lawyer, was born in this cottage, Feb. 3, 1842. He graduated from Oglethorpe Univ. then at Milledgeville, served as a private in the Confederate Army and was captured while commanding a . . . — Map (db m664) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-21 — Camp Wheeler
Camp Wheeler was an army training camp during 1917-19 and 1940-46. It was named for Joseph Wheeler (1836-1906), Confederate Lt. Gen. who was born in Augusta, Ga. The tent camp was established in 1917 after efforts of local businessmen brought Gen. . . . — Map (db m12415) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 11-2 — Central City College/Georgia Baptist College
Founded in October 1899 by the Reverend E. K. Love under the auspices of the Missionary Baptist Convention of Georgia, Central City College served as a co-educational institution of learning for African-American students at both the high school and . . . — Map (db m23065) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-19 — Christ ChurchEpiscopal
The Reverend Lot Jones, while on a missionary tour of Georgia, founded Christ Episcopal Church on March 5, 1825. It was the first congregation organized in Macon. On December 26, 1826, the Georgia General Assembly enacted, “that Christopher B. . . . — Map (db m49579) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-2 — City Hall & Old Capitol
The Macon City Hall, built in 1837 for the Monroe Railroad & Banking Co. and since remodeled, served from Nov. 18, 1864 till March 11, 1865 as temporary Capitol of Ga. Here Gov. Brown had his office and convened the last session of the Ga. . . . — Map (db m60529) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-7 — Colonial Trading Path
Colonial Trading Path or “Lower Path” joined the heart of the Creek Nation on the Chattahoochee River to the English Trading Post in Ocmulgee Old Fields, now Ocmulgee National Monument. Here the chief towns of the ancient Creek . . . — Map (db m49624) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-8 — Confederate Memorial Day in Macon
On Thursday, April 26, 1866, the graves of Confederate soldiers in Rose Hill Cemetery and in the cemetery at 7th and Cherry Streets were decorated with flowers by the members of the Ladies’ Memorial Association, organized in March 1866 with Mrs. . . . — Map (db m37572) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-24 — Confederate States Central Laboratory
Approximately 100 feet south of the this point stood the Confederate States Central Laboratory. Erected between 1862 and 1865, this laboratory-factory complex spread over 145 acres purchased December 2, 1862. It was intended as permanent facility . . . — Map (db m12290) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-22 — De Soto in Georgia
In May 1539 Hernando De Soto landed in Florida with over 600 people, 220 horses and mules, and a herd reserved for famine. Fired by his success in Pizarro's conquest of Peru, De Soto had been granted the rights, by the King of Spain, to explore, . . . — Map (db m27272) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-11 — First Public Camellia Show
After a revival of interest in camellias, the first public Camellia Show in the U.S. was held Feb. 5, 1932 at Burden-Smith & Co. At the suggestion of Henry T. Conner, immediately after the show, the Azalea and Camellia Soc. of America, forerunner of . . . — Map (db m49669) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 11-5 — Fort Hawkins
Fort Hawkins was established at this site in 1806 on the eastern bank of the Ocmulgee River at the border of the Muskogee Creek Nation. The location was chosen by the fort’s namesake, Benjamin Hawkins, who served as the U.S. Agent for Indian Affairs . . . — Map (db m59564) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-20 — General Edward Dorr Tracy, Jr.-- 1833 – 1863 –-
Edward D. Tracy, Jr., was born in Macon, Georgia, on Nov. 5, 1833. His father served as Macon’s second Mayor (1826-1828), a Judge of Superior Court, and hosted General Lafayette during his visit to Macon in 1825. The younger Tracy graduated from the . . . — Map (db m25388) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-16 — Jefferson Davis at the Lanier House
On May 4, 1865, Jefferson Davis arrived in Washington, Georgia (100 miles NE), where he performed what proved to be his last duties as President of the Confederate States of America. Shortly thereafter, with a small staff and escort, he departed . . . — Map (db m25409) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-4 — Judge Asa Holt House
This house, built in 1853 by Judge Asa Holt, was struck by a cannon ball from Gen. Stoneman´s guns in East Macon during the Battle of Dunlap´s Hill. July 30, 1864, when the Union army tried unsuccessfully to take Macon. The ball, now in the . . . — Map (db m23376) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-18 — Mercer University
Founded in Pensfield, Georgia, January 14, 1833, as Mercer Institute, Mercer University, the “oldest child” of the Georgia Baptist Convention, has been the chief source of Baptist ministerial and lay leaders through the years. Among the . . . — Map (db m44946) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-23 — Mulberry Street Methodist Church
This church, organized in 1826, is on land deeded to it by the Georgia Legislature in the same year. In 1828, the first church building in Macon was erected on this site. The first appointed pastor was Thomas Darley, who had been ordained by Bishop . . . — Map (db m29210) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-12 — Site: Wesleyan CollegeWorld’s First College Chartered to Grant Degrees to Women
On December 23, 1836, the Legislature of the State of Georgia chartered The Georgia Female College. The first class graduated July 26, 1840. In 1843, the name was changed to Wesleyan Female College; in 1919 to Wesleyan College. The oldest . . . — Map (db m54616) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 11-4 — St. Joseph's Catholic Church
The history of Roman Catholicism in Macon dates to a visit in 1829 by Bishop John England of the Diocese of Charleston and the subsequent migration of Irish Catholic families in the 1830s. In 1841 Macon's Catholics received their first pastor, . . . — Map (db m22189) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 11-6 — St. Peter Claver Catholic Church and School
This African-American parish began in 1888 and was named St. Peter Claver in 1903, in honor of the Patron Saint of Negro Missions. The current school, convent, and rectory were built here after the parish moved from Pio Nono Avenue in 1913. The . . . — Map (db m25123) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-3 — The Dunlap House←←←
The only battles fought at Macon took place here. Twice the Federals attacked Macon, emplanting their cannon on this farm, and twice they were repulsed. In the first attack under Gen. Stoneman on July 30, 1864, they shelled Macon from 10 A.M. until . . . — Map (db m44995) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 11-1 — The First Baptist Church of Christat Macon
This church was founded in 1826 as the city’s first Baptist congregation. It was first located at the site of the present Bibb County Courthouse. The fourth and final move, to this site, occurred in 1883 and the current building was dedicated in . . . — Map (db m23046) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-17 — The First Presbyterian Church
Organized as the Presbyterian Church of Macon on June 18, 1826, by the Rev. Benjamin Gildersleeve and the Rev. Joseph C. Stiles, the church dedicated this house of worship, its third, on September 19, 1858, at the close of the ministry of the Rev. . . . — Map (db m44944) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-14 — The March to the Sea
On Nov. 15, 1864, after destroying Atlanta, Maj. Gen. W.T. Sherman, USA, began his March to the Sea. His army (650,000 infantry and 5,500 cavalry) moved in two widely separated wings. The Right Wing (15th and 17th Corps), Maj. Gen. O. O. Howard, . . . — Map (db m25408) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-13 — The Stoneman Raid
In July, 1864, Union forces under Maj. Gen. W.T. Sherman, USA, closed in on Atlanta. Finding its fortifications “too strong to assault and too extensive to invest,” Sherman sought to force its evacuation by sending Maj. Gen. Geo. . . . — Map (db m44555) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-15 — Wilson's Raid To Macon
On March 22, 1865, the Cavalry Corps, Military Division of the Mississippi [US], Bvt. Maj. Gen. James H. Wilson, USA, left the Tennessee River near Florence, Ala., and marched south to Selma to destroy its arsenals and foundries. On April 10th, . . . — Map (db m25380) HM
Georgia (Bleckley County), Cochran — 012-1 — Bleckley County
This County, created by an act of the Georgia Legislature July 30, 1912, is named for Chief Justice Logan E. Bleckley, of the Georgia Supreme Court, one of the greatest jurists in the history of this State. Born in Rabun County in 1827, he . . . — Map (db m47553) HM
Georgia (Bleckley County), Cochran — 012-3 — Evergreen Baptist Church»—→
Evergreen Baptist Church, built in 1844, was split off from old Mt. Horeb Baptist Church, constituted October 15, 1809, which stood at or near the site of the Centenary Methodist Church. On February 14, 1844, the congregation and pastor found . . . — Map (db m40312) HM
Georgia (Bleckley County), Cochran — 012-2 — Longstreet Methodist Church
Longstreet Methodist Church was organized around 1812 and the original building is still in use. Land for the church was given by Charles Walker, one of the five sons of George Walker, Revolutionary soldier and early settler. The sons built on a . . . — Map (db m40313) HM
Georgia (Bleckley County), Cochran — 012-4 — Uchee Path
This highway coincides closely with a segment of a noted east-west Indian route called the Lower Uchee Path. Beginning at Old Town on the Ogeechee, the trail led this way by Carr’s Shoals, on the Oconee, above Dublin, thence via Cochran, . . . — Map (db m40267) HM
Georgia (Brantley County), Hoboken — 84 B-7 — Trail Ridge
This ridge, interrupted only by major streams, extends south from the Altamaha River in Georgia to the Santa Fe River in Florida, a distance of 130 miles. It is an ancient barrier beach formerly many miles off-shore in the sea which covered this . . . — Map (db m12423) HM
Georgia (Brantley County), Nahunta — 013-1 — Brantley County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature Aug. 14, 1920, is named for Benjamin D. Brantley. It is said that the old B. & W. Railroad, which was partly destroyed, marked the most southern point of advance of Sherman`s Army. Among the first . . . — Map (db m24045) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Grooverville — 014-10 — Grooverville Methodist Church
This church had its beginning in 1832, on the plantation of William H. Ramsey, about 4 1/2 miles Southwest of here. There being no Methodist services in the vicinity at the time he and his family moved to this area. Mr. Ramsey built a brush-arbor . . . — Map (db m10025) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Grooverville — 014-4 — Liberty Baptist Church
Between 1837 and 1841 the Baptists in this section were stirred on Missions, Sunday Schools and ministerial support. In 1841 the Ocklochnee anti-Missionary Baptist Assn. passed a ruling to dismiss members believing in the “new fangled . . . — Map (db m10172) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Morven — 014-3 — Mount Zion Camp Ground
The first Camp Meeting was held on this site in 1828 by a "few scattered Methodists" before any Methodist Church in the area was organized. William Hendry, William Blair and Hamilton W. Sharpe, as a committee, selected the site. Rev. Adam Wyrick was . . . — Map (db m14761) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Morven — 014-6 — Old Coffee Road<–––– ––––>
The Old Coffee Road, first vehicular and postal route of this area, passed here running southwestward from the Ocmulgee River via today´s Lax, Nashville, Cecil, Barwick, and Thomasville to the Florida line above Tallahassee. The thoroughfare was . . . — Map (db m14751) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Nankin — 014-7 — Columbia Primitive Baptist Church
Columbia Primitive Baptist Church was formally constituted on the first Sunday in October, 1833, after serving as an arm of Bethany Church more than a year. Moses Dees was the first delegate from Columbia to the annual meeting of the mother church, . . . — Map (db m14749) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Pavo — 014-8 — Bethel Primitive Baptist Church
Bethel Primitive Baptist Church, the second Baptist Church to be organized in the area of old Lowndes County, was constituted September 2, 1826. The organizing Presbytery were: Elders Benjamin Manning. Matthew Albritton and Henry Melton, with . . . — Map (db m51514) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Quitman — 014-9 — Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church
Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church about 4 miles Southwest of here, was constituted November 29, 1834. The charter members included: William T. Rushing, his wife, Belinda; Asa Geiger, his wife, Nancy; William Jones, his wife, Elizabeth; James . . . — Map (db m14747) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Quitman — 014-1 — Brooks County
This county created by Act of the Legislature Dec. 11, 1858, is named for Preston Smith Brooks, zealous defender of States Rights. Born in S.C. Aug. 6, 1819, Brooks served in the Mexican War & in Congress. He died June 27, 1857. The first County . . . — Map (db m26977) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Quitman — 14-1 — Civil War Slave Conspiracy
In August 1864, during the American Civil War, four men were executed in Brooks County, Georgia, for conspiring to plot a slave insurrection. The conspirators – led by a local white man, John Vickery, and three slaves named Nelson, George, and . . . — Map (db m40368) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Quitman — 014-5 — Old Coffee Road<–––– ––––>
The Old Coffee Road, earliest vehicular and postal route of this area, crossed here, leading southwestward from the Ocmulgee River via today´s Lax, Nashville, Cecil, Barwick and Thomasville to the Florida Line. The thoroughfare was opened by . . . — Map (db m14763) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Quitman — 014-2 — West End Cemetery
In this cemetery, during the last year of the War Between the States, a number of Confederate soldiers, 17 of them unknown, were buried. Memorial services for these soldiers were held as early as 1869. In 1871, on Memorial Day, April 26, a group of . . . — Map (db m26978) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Blitchton — 015-10 — Jencks Bridge
On Nov. 15, 1864, after destroying Atlanta and cutting his communications with the North, Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman, USA, began his destructive Campaign for Savannah -- the March to the Sea. He divided his army [US] into two wings. The Left Wing (14th . . . — Map (db m11957) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Blitchton — 015-5B — Old River Road
The highway northward is the Old River Road, one of the earliest routes west of the Ogeechee and a leading way from Savannah to Georgia`s western frontier. It followed an old Indian trial [sic] along the Ogeechee to a point west of Bartow, . . . — Map (db m12474) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Ellabell — 015-11 — Sherman's Right Wing
On Dec. 6, 1864, the 15th Corps (US), the extreme right of Gen. Sherman's army on its destructive March to the Sea, camped near Jenk`s Bridge on Great Ogeechee River, east of Blitchton. On the 7th, Oliver's brigade was sent in advance of Hazen's . . . — Map (db m11939) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Keller — 15-1 — Bryan Neck Presbyterian Church
This church, the oldest congregation in lower Bryan County, was certified by the Presbytery of Georgia in 1830. Its founders included rice planters on Bryan Neck, among them Thomas Savage Clay, Richard James Arnold and George Washington McAllister. . . . — Map (db m18648) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Pembroke — 015-1 — Bryan County
This County created by Act of the Legislature Dec. 19, 1793, is named for Jonathan Bryan, Revolutionary patriot and member of the Executive Council in 1777. The `lost town` of Hardwick on the Ogeechee River was the first temporary County . . . — Map (db m14952) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Richmond Hill — 015-8 — "Dead Town" of Hardwicke»—8 mi.—→
On May 10, 1754 GEORGE TOWN was established at the "Elbow" of Great Ogeechee River, eight miles east. In February, 1755, Gov. Reynolds, dissatisfied with Savannah as a capital and as a port, chose this new site because it has a . . . — Map (db m8364) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Richmond Hill — 015-9 — Fort Argyle
Near here, on the West bank of the Ogeechee River, Fort Argyle was built in 1733, to command one of the main passes by which enemy Indians had recently invaded South Carolina, and to give protection to the settlers of Savannah from anticipated raid . . . — Map (db m29523) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Richmond Hill — 015-6 — Fort McAllister»— 10 Mi. →
Situated at Genesis Point, 10 miles east on the right bank of the Great Ogeechee River below the "lost town" of Hardwick, this fort was the right of the exterior line designed for the defense of Savannah. It denied the use of the river to Union . . . — Map (db m8387) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Richmond Hill — 015-5 — Fort McAllister← 4.5 mi.—«
East 4.5 miles, on Great Ogeechee River, Fort McAllister was built 1861-62 to guard the "back door" to Savannah. During 1862-63, it repulsed 7 attacks by armored vessels, some mounting 15-inch guns. Dec. 13, 1864, its small garrison of 230 Georgians . . . — Map (db m29452) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Richmond Hill — 015-3 — Fort McAllister The Assault From The Rear
Dec. 1864. Fort McAllister, built 1861-62 to close the Great Ogeechee River to enemy ships, mounted 11 siege guns, 12 field pieces and 1 10-inch mortar. Below it, piles and torpedoes obstructed the channel. As the Union forces neared Savannah, the . . . — Map (db m16103) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Richmond Hill — 015-4 — Fort McAllister The Naval Bombardments
On July 1st and 29th, 1862, the fort was shelled by Union gunboats and on Nov. 19th by the ironclad "Wissahickon" and two escort craft. Hit below the waterline, "Wissahickon" withdrew after firing 17 11-inch and 25 other shells. The escorts withdrew . . . — Map (db m16102) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Richmond Hill — 015-12 — Hazen's Division at the Canoochee River
On Dec. 6, 1864, the 15th Corps (US), Maj. Gen. P. J. Osterhaus, USA the extreme right of Gen. Sherman's army on its destructive March to the Sea, camped near Jenk's Bridge, on Great Ogeechee River east of Blichton. On the 7th, Oliver's brigade of . . . — Map (db m15812) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Richmond Hill — 015-13 — Kilpatrick on Bryan Neck
On Dec. 12, 1864, the 3rd Cavalry Division [US], Brig. Gen. J. L. Kilpatrick, USA, covering the right rear of Gen. Sherman`s army which was then closing in on Savannah, crossed the Great Ogeechee River near Fort Argyle and the Canoochee River near . . . — Map (db m29458) HM
Georgia (Bryan County), Richmond Hill — 015-7 — Sinking of the CSS ''Nashville (Rattlesnake)"
In July, 1862 the CSS "Nashville", Capt. Baker, ran the Union blockade and entered Savannah via Wilmington river with a cargo of arms. Loaded with cotton for Europe, she attempted to escape via Ossabaw Sound. Thwarted by the vigilance of the . . . — Map (db m16104) HM
Georgia (Bulloch County), Adabelle — 16-1 — Croatan Indian Community
In 1870 a group of Croatan Indians migrated from their homes in Robeson County North Carolina, following the turpentine industry to southeast Georgia. Eventually many of the Croatans became tenant farmers for the Adabelle Trading Company, growing . . . — Map (db m14156) HM
Georgia (Bulloch County), Arcola — 016-2A — John Abbot (1751-1839)Ornithologist, Entomologist, Artist »—⅓ Mi.→
In the old McElveen Cemetery, one-third of a mile northeast of this marker, is the grave of John Abbot, pioneer naturalist of Georgia. Abbot was born in London June 1, 1751, and in early youth became devoted to the study and delineation of insects. . . . — Map (db m24018) HM
Georgia (Bulloch County), Donegal — 016-5 — Old Savannah Road←—→
The highway crossing here is the Old Savannah Road, one of the earliest vehicular routes west of the Ogeechee River. It led from Savannah to the Rock Landing on the Oconee, to the south of the present Milledgeville. there it connected with the main . . . — Map (db m11101) HM
Georgia (Bulloch County), Donegal — 016-1 — Union Meeting House(Organized 1790)
Three miles east of this point, on the old River Road, is located Union Meeting House (Methodist), the oldest church in Bulloch county, and one of the oldest churches in Georgia remaining continuously active since its organization. Title was . . . — Map (db m10890) HM
Georgia (Bulloch County), Ivanhoe — 016-4 — Old River Road<------->
The highway crossing here is the Old River Road, one of the earliest white man’s routes west of the Ogeechee. The State authorized the opening of this portion of the old thoroughfare in 1777. It followed the course of an Indian trail that led to the . . . — Map (db m54031) HM
Georgia (Bulloch County), Statesboro — 016-2B — Bulloch County
Bulloch County was created by Act. of Feb. 8, 1776 from Bryan and Screven Counties. Originally, it contained part of Evans, Candler, Emanuel and Jenkins Counties. It was named for Archibald Bulloch (1730-1777), Revolutionary leader, elected Pres. of . . . — Map (db m10401) HM
Georgia (Bulloch County), Statesboro — 016-7 — Skirmish at Statesboro
Approaching Statesboro on Dec. 4, 1864, a strong party of mounted foragers from Hazen's division, 15th Corps (USA), on the right of Gen. Sherman's army on its destructive March to the Sea, was attacked by a detachment of Confederate cavalry and . . . — Map (db m11173) HM
Georgia (Bulloch County), Statesboro — 16-6 — The March to the Sea
On Nov. 15, 1864, after destroying Atlanta and cutting his communications to the North, Maj. Gen. W.T. Sherman, USA, began his destructive campaign for Savannah – the March to the Sea. He divided his army (US) into two wings. The Left Wing . . . — Map (db m9945) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Alexander — 017-17 — Sherman's Left Wing
On Dec. 4, 1864, Kilpatrick`s cavalry division (USA) of Gen. Sherman`s army, supported by two brigades of Baird`s infantry division of the 14th Corps, drove units of Wheeler`s cavalry corps (CSA) out of Waynesboro and across Brier Creek in order to . . . — Map (db m7959) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Midville — 017-9 — Bark Camp Church
Constituted in the early part of 1788, Bark Camp Baptist Church was a center for culture and hospitality in Bark Camp, one of the oldest settlements in Burke County and a community of wealthy and prominent plantation owners. Among the 29 charter . . . — Map (db m44549) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Midville — 017-11 — Sherman at Midville
On Nov. 15, 1864, after destroying Atlanta and cutting his communications with the North, Maj. Gen. W.T. Sherman, USA, began his destructive Campaign for Savannah - the March to the Sea. He divided his army [US] into two wings. The Left Wing (14th . . . — Map (db m32534) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Munnerlyn — 017-12 — The 14th Corps at Lumpkin's Station
On Dec. 3, 1864, after a hard march across Buckhead, Rocky Beaver Dam and Rosemary creeks from camps N. of Birdsville and W. of Buckhead Church, the 14th Corps [US], Maj. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, [US] (less Baird's division) camped at Lumpkin's station . . . — Map (db m13119) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Sardis — 017-1 — Old Quaker Road
This highway has been following closely the course of the Old Quaker Road, one of Georgia's earliest vehicular thoroughfares. It was opened about 1769 to link Savannah, the colonial capital, with a Quaker settlement centering around Wrightsboro in . . . — Map (db m7992) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Sardis — 124-21 — Sardis Baptist Church
On Sept. 28, 1803, a group of men living in Burke County near Beech Branch Meeting House, "found to be in the true Baptist faith", by a presbytery of Rev. Henry Hand and Rev. John Ross, were constituted into one Body as a Baptist Church. A church . . . — Map (db m18718) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 017-18 — Bellevue Plantation
Dating from a royal grant by King George III to Samuel Eastlake in 1767, Belleview Plantation has been owned continuously by the Carswell family since 1835. The year in which the house was built is not known but it is believed to have been erected . . . — Map (db m59870) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 017-3 — Botsford Church - 1773—→
Botsford Church, Constituted in 1773 by the Rev. Edmund Botsford, was the second Baptist church in Georgia. Originally located 25 miles below Augusta, known as the New Savannah Church, it was moved about 10 miles to this place after the Revolution. . . . — Map (db m13116) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 017-6 — Burke County
Burke County, an original county, was created by the Const. of Feb. 5, 1777, from Creek Cession of May 30, 1733. In 1758, it had been organized as the Parish of St. George. Originally, it contained parts of Jefferson, Jenkins and Screven Counties. . . . — Map (db m7856) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 017-8 — Burke County's 8 Governors
Historic Burke County, formerly St. George`s Parish, claims 8 Ga. Governors by birth, residence or marriage. JOHN HOUSTOUN (1744-1796), Rev. patriot, member of Continental Congress, Gov. 1778-1779 & 1784-1785, was born near present Waynesboro. LYMAN . . . — Map (db m7867) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 17-4 — First Presbyterian Church»—→
Scotch Presbyterians of St. George`s Parish, now Burke County, by 1760 had organized churches at Brier Creek, Old Church (formerly Episcopalian) and Walnut Branch. In 1771 Rev. Josiah Lewis became the first permanent pastor, sent by the Synod of New . . . — Map (db m40268) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 017-2 — Old Quaker Road
The highway bearing left is the Old Quaker road, on of Georgia's earliest vehicular highways. It was opened about 1769 to provide a direct way from Savannah to a Quaker settlement centering around Wrightsboro in today's upper McDuffie County. . . . — Map (db m8022) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 25 B-4 — Shell Bluff
Shell Bluff on the Savannah River 15 miles northeast has been famous since Indian days because of its outcrops of fossil shells including those of giant oysters. These lived in the Eocene sea that covered this part of Georgia some 50 million years . . . — Map (db m13134) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 017-13 — Skirmish at Rocky Creek Church
Dec. 2, 1864. Baird's Division, 14th Corps [US], marching on the left of Gen. Sherman’s army in support of Kilpatrick’s cavalry division, which was enroute to burn the bridges over Brier Creek, NE of Waynesboro, reached Rocky Creek about 10:00 A.M. . . . — Map (db m60505) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 017-16 — The Cavalry Actions at Waynesboro
Late on Nov. 26, 1864, elements of the 3rd Cavalry Division (USA), Brig. Gen. J.L. Kilpatrick, USA, of Gen. Sherman`s army, reached the railroad bridge north of Waynesboro and partially burned it before being driven off by troops of the Cavalry . . . — Map (db m7903) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 17-1 — Washington’s Southern Tour
Traveling from Savannah to Augusta on his Southern tour of 1791, President George Washington stopped in Waynesboro on May 17. Departing from Savannah two days earlier, Washington lodged at "one Spencers " in Effingham County, fifteen miles north of . . . — Map (db m7800) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 017-10 — Waynesborough
On July 31, 1783, an Act was passed by the General Assembly meeting in Augusta to lay out a town, Waynesborough, on reserved or private land. Commissioners named (Thomas Lewis, Sr., Thomas Lewis, Jr., John Duhart, Edward Telfair, John Jones) were . . . — Map (db m7868) HM
Georgia (Butts County), Flovilla — 018-7 — Kilpatrick at Cork
On Nov. 17, 1864, Kilpatrick’s cavalry division [US], which was covering the right flank of Gen. Sherman’s army on its March to the Sea, moved from Bear Creek Station (Hampton), 30 mi. NW, down the north bank of Towaliga River to threaten Griffin . . . — Map (db m39955) HM
Georgia (Butts County), Jackson — 018-1 — Butts County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature December 24, 1825, is named for Capt. Sam Butts killed in the Indian War of 1814 at the Battle of Chalibbee. At Indian Springs, now a State Park, were signed the Treaties with the Creeks giving Georgia . . . — Map (db m21385) HM
Georgia (Butts County), Jackson — 018-3 — Crossing the Ocmulgee
On the morning of Nov. 18, 1864, the Right Wing (15th and 17th Corps) of General Sherman’s army [US] moved from its bivouacs in and near Jackson toward Planters’ Factory (Ocmulgee Mills), on the Ocmulgee River at Seven Islands (9 miles SE), to . . . — Map (db m21370) HM
Georgia (Butts County), Jackson — 018-8 — Home of Robert Grier»— 1 mi.—→
Robert Grier, astronomer and founder of "Grier’s Almanac", and his family lived about one mile from here and are buried in a family cemetery near the home. Robert Grier was born in 1780 at his father’s home in Taliaferro Co. He attended Old . . . — Map (db m21337) HM
Georgia (Butts County), Jackson — 018-4 — Iron Springs
On the night of Nov. 17, 1864, the Right Wing (15th and 17th Corps) of General Sherman’s army [US], which had marched south from Atlanta on Nov 15th on its destructive March to the Sea, reached Jackson and camped in and around the town. Hq. Right . . . — Map (db m26975) HM
Georgia (Butts County), Jackson — 42 E-9 — McIntosh House
Across the highway stands the inn built about 1823 by William McIntosh, half-breed chief of the Lower Creek Indians. Here on February 12, 1825, McIntosh and other chiefs signed the Second Treaty of Indian Springs, giving up their last Georgia land. . . . — Map (db m395) HM

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