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Battle of Kernstown Historical Markers

Two battles took place in the Shenandoah Valley at this site near Winchester, Virginia.
 
First Battle of Kernstown Marker near the Kernstown Methodist Church image, Touch for more information
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
First Battle of Kernstown Marker near the Kernstown Methodist Church
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — First Battle of Kernstown
Was fought here Sunday, March 23, 1862 Confederates under Gen. T.J. “Stonewall” Jackson attacked Federals under Gen. James Shields. The fighting was chiefly west of the road and continued from early afternoon until nightfall. When . . . — Map (db m2635) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Kernstown Battles
Around this site and a mile to the west occurred two major battles of the Civil War. First Kernstown March 23, 1862 Stonewall Jackson attacked what appeared to be a withdrawing federal force led by federal Br. Gen. Shields. Desperate fighting . . . — Map (db m2632) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Rose Hill“I do not recollect having ever heard such a roar of musketry.” — 1862 Valley Campaign
The First Battle of Kernstown, on March 23, 1862, was also the first major Civil War battle fought in the Shenandoah Valley. Throughout the morning, 16 Union cannons on Pritchard’s Hill held off Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s . . . — Map (db m2646) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The First Battle of KernstownThe Beginning of “Stonewall” Jackson’s Valley Campaign
The First Battle of Kernstown, fought by 10,000 Americans on March 23, 1862, was the first battle waged in the Shenandoah Valley. Throughout the morning, sixteen Union cannon crowned the knolls of Pritchard’s Hill (the high ground immediately north . . . — Map (db m2169) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The First Battle of KernstownFulkerson’s Virginians Attack!
The low, marshy ground stretching from here to the distant road lay uncontested through the five-hour artillery duel that opened the First Battle of Kernstown. The scene changed dramatically at 2:00 P.M. when 900 Virginians marched toward this . . . — Map (db m2195) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The First Battle of KernstownAn Unheralded Commander’s Unique Victory
At 9:00 A.M. on March 23, 1862, Confederate artillery unlimbered near the Valley Turnpike and fired on this height, called Pritchard’s Hill, to begin the First Battle of Kernstown. Union artillery rolled onto these knolls and responded by . . . — Map (db m2197) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The Pritchard HouseA Family Caught in the Midst of War!
The large brick dwelling before you is the Pritchard House, built by Steven C. Pritchard, Jr. and his son Samuel R. Pritchard. During the Civil War, Samuel, his wife Helen, and their two small children occupied the house. Fighting swirled around the . . . — Map (db m2295) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The Second Battle of KernstownMulligan’s Final Stand
Late in the afternoon on July 24, 1864, 1,800 Union soldiers led by Colonel James A. Mulligan fell back to this lane. Major General John B. Gordon’s Confederate force attacked from the ground beyond Opequon Church. Mulligan held off Gordon briefly, . . . — Map (db m2190) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The Second Battle of KernstownTwo Future U.S. Presidents Fought at Kernstown
Colonel James A. Mulligan’s Union command of 1,800 men encamped on these heights on the night of July 23-24, 1864. When Confederate cavalry drove Union cavalry back toward Kernstown on the morning of the 24th, Mulligan deployed two cannon on this . . . — Map (db m2199) HM

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