Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Oregon Trail Historical Markers

The Oregon Trail was the only practical corridor to reach the entire western United States from 1836 – 1869. Over half a million people went west during the Oregon Trail’s “glory years.”201 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 1
 
Oregon Trail Marker image, Touch for more information
By Barry Swackhamer, December 1, 2014
Oregon Trail Marker
Colorado (Sedgwick County), Julesburg — Oregon Trail
South of river Old Julesberg Stage and Pony Express Station, 5 mi. S.W. Trail and station marked 1931 — Map (db m79879) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — 359 — Beaver Dick's Ferry
In 1863 and 1864, overland packers hauling supplies from Salt Lake City to Idaho City crossed here and took a direct route northward to More's Creek. They cut a steep grade from the Oregon Trail down to Beaver Dick's Ferry, which served a . . . — Map (db m22641) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — 375 — Oregon Trail
Indians, trappers, and emigrants who came this way before 1900 used a more direct route to get between Boise and Glenns Ferry. Their road still can be seen at Bonneville Point 5 miles from here. Following close to a line of hills bordering a . . . — Map (db m22181) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — 151 — The Oregon Trail
The Oregon Trail is still clearly visible coming off the rimrock across the river. Here the west bound emigrants after 1840 came gratefully down into this green valley. The first cart passed here with Spalding and Whitman, pioneer missionaries, . . . — Map (db m22639) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Bloomington — 319 — British SettlersBear Lake — LDS Church
Most early Bear Lake settlers came from Britain. One was the first woman convert to the LDS church in Europe.

Born in Preston, England, Aug. 24, 1806. Ann Elizabeth Walmsley Palmer was baptized July 30, 1837. An invalid, she was carried into the . . . — Map (db m99318) HM

Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — 335 — Big Hill
On their way west to Oregon and California, emigrant wagons often crossed high ridges in order to avoid gullies and canyons. When he came here in 1843, Theodore Talbot noted that he "had to cross a very high hill, which is said to be the . . . — Map (db m90807) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — Big Hill
"... the greatest impediment on the whole route from the United States to Fort Hall." - Theodore Talbot, 1843 Near the Wyoming/Idaho border the pioneers face Big Hill, on of the most challenging obstacles of their journey. The dusty . . . — Map (db m90854) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — Big Hill...
"the steepest and longest ascent we have made on the route..." - James Wilkins Looking east across the fields is Big Hill, one of the most difficult obstacles along the 2,000-mile Oregon/California Trail. The trail crosses the Thomas . . . — Map (db m90851) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — Hot, Cold, Dry, Wet, Dusty, 2,000-Mile Trail
Beginning in Independence, Missouri, the Oregon/California Trail passes through present-day Missouri, Kansas, Wyoming, and Idaho. it ends in Oregon, California or Utah - depending on the destination of the pioneers. While the . . . — Map (db m90876) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — Idaho's Emigrant Trails
Westward-bound emigrants entered Idaho after crossing Thomas Fork Valley. They soon encountered the climb and descent of Big Hill, witnessed nature's curiosities at Soda Springs, and discovered willing traders at Fort Hall. In 1843 wagons first . . . — Map (db m90852) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — 456 — McAuley's Road
Coming west with Ezra Meeker in 1852, Thomas McAuley decided to build a road to let emigrants bypass Big Hill. Worst of all Oregon Trail descents, Big Hill needed replacement. Eliza McAuley reported that her brother Tom "fished awhile, . . . — Map (db m90808) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — One Continual Stream
"One continual stream of honest looking open harted people going west" - James Cayman, mountain man, captured this sentiment in his diary as he watched pioneers heading west in 1846. Between 1841 and 1869 nearly 300,000 farmers, . . . — Map (db m90853) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — 159 — Smith's Trading Post
In 1848, Pegleg Smith established a trading post on the Oregon Trail at Big Timber somewhere near here on the river. Some travelers called it "Fort Smith", though it had only four log cabins and some Indian lodges. Packing a plow and tools . . . — Map (db m90805) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — The McAuley Cutoff
On April 7, 1852, seventeen-year-old Eliza Ann McAuley, with her older brother Thomas and sister Margaret, left Mount Pleasant, Iowa, to travel overland to California. For a time they were accompanied by the "Eddyville Company," led by William Buck . . . — Map (db m90850) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — 157 — Thomas Fork
A bad ford gave trouble to wagon trains crossing this stream on the trail to California and Oregon in 1849. In that year, gold-seeking 49'ers developed a shortcut that crossed here. Then emigrants built two bridges here in 1850. But an . . . — Map (db m90804) HM
Idaho (Blaine County), Carey — 354 — Goodale's Cutoff
When emigrants began to take their westbound wagons along an old Indian and trapper’s trail past this lava, they had to develop a wild and winding road. At this spot, like many others, they had hardly enough space to get by. At times, they . . . — Map (db m4650) HM
Idaho (Canyon County), Caldwell — 455 — Emigrant Crossing
After reaching Boise River, emigrant wagons had to travel 30 miles to find a good crossing about 1/4 mile north of here. They had to avoid a wide zone of shifting channels, so they descended Canyon Hill where the route is still visible. In . . . — Map (db m22326) HM
Idaho (Canyon County), Middleton — 75 — The Ward Massacre
Only 2 young boys survived the Indian attack on Alexander Ward's 20 member party, Oregon bound on August 20, 1854. Military retaliation for the slaughter so enraged the Indians that Hudson's Bay Co. posts Fort Boise and Fort Hall had to be . . . — Map (db m22328) HM
Idaho (Canyon County), Parma — 85 — Old Fort Boise
An important Hudson's Bay Company fur trade post was established in 1834 four miles west of here on the bank of the Snake River. Fur trading declined, but this British post became famous for its hospitality to American travellers on the Oregon . . . — Map (db m21992) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — 198 — Oregon Trail
A perilous ford at Three Island State Park was a formidable Oregon Trail barrier. Those who could not cross here faced a longer, more difficult southern route. No other ford between Missouri and Oregon troubled them so much. This was their largest . . . — Map (db m31677) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — To All Pioneers
To all pioneers who crossed over Three Island Crossing and helped to win the west. Erected 1931 by Troop One Boy Scouts of America Roslyn, New York Scoutmaster E.K. Pietsch — Map (db m31679) HM
Idaho (Payette County), Fruitland — 263 — Snake River
The valley of the Snake, historic passage from the Midwest to the Northwest, has been a primary route for travel since the days of Indians and fur traders. The Oregon Trail forded the river at Old Fort Boise, the Hudson's Bay Company 12 miles . . . — Map (db m23195) HM
Idaho (Twin Falls County), Hagerman — 206 — Payne's Ferry
A scow powered by oarsmen let Oregon Trail wagons cross Snake River here from 1852 to 1870. Then Overland Stage service from Boise to a rail terminal in Kelton, Utah was moved to this crossing, and M.E. Payne installed a large (14 by 60 foot) new . . . — Map (db m31653) HM
Idaho (Twin Falls County), Hagerman — 204 — Salmon Falls
In 1812, Joseph Miller found 100 lodges of Indians spearing thousands of salmon each afternoon at a cascade below here. Each summer they dried a year's supply. After 1842, they also traded salmon to Oregon Trail emigrants. John C. Fremont marveled . . . — Map (db m31597) HM
Idaho (Twin Falls County), Hansen — 342 — Rock Creek Station
An 1864 overland stage station at Rock Creek, 5 miles south and a mile west of here, offered a desert oasis for 40 years before irrigated farming transformed this area. James Bascom's 1865 store and Herman Stricker's 1900 mansion have been . . . — Map (db m31521) HM
Idaho (Washington County), Cambridge — 185 — Brownlee Ferry
Guiding Oregon Trail emigrants and a party of prospectors who had discovered gold in Boise Basin, Tim Goodale opened a new miners' trail through here in August 1862. A gold rush followed that fall, and John Brownlee operated a ferry here from . . . — Map (db m23227) HM
Kansas (Douglas County), Kanwaka — Coon PointOregon Trail — 1842
A Camping Ground Lecompton Territorial Capital of Kansas 1855-1861 Three miles north — Map (db m50757) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Gardner — 6 — Overland Trails
Here US-56 lies directly on the route of the Oregon-California and Santa Fe trails. Nearby, the trails branched. On a rough sign pointing northwest were the words, "Road to Oregon." Another marker directed travelers southwest along the road to Santa . . . — Map (db m21669) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — A Most Desirable Spot For Camping
The Lone Elm Campground The land here at Lone Elm met the three requirements for a stopover for travelers on the trail...wood, water, and grass. Wood for campfires and wagon repairs, water for the support of people and animals, and grass for . . . — Map (db m34342) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Elm Grove Campground
For over three decades starting in 1827, Elm Grove Campground, one mile east of near the bridge on Cedar Creek, was an important frontier camp site. Thousands of Santa Fe traders, Oregon and California emigrants, missionaries, mountain men, soldiers . . . — Map (db m20093) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Lone Elm Campground
Lone Elm is one of the most historic and important frontier trail camp sites in America and was used as a campground and rendezvous point for all three of our nation's great western roads to the frontier.....the Santa Fe, Oregon, and California . . . — Map (db m34334) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Lone Elm Park
"Travelers came to look upon it as an old friend - they felt an attachment for the tree that had so often sheltered and shaded them from storm and sun..." W.W.H. Davis (1853) Lone Elm Park was purchased by the City of Olathe in 2000 to . . . — Map (db m34339) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Roads To The West
The Santa Fe Trail The Santa Fe Trail began in 1821 when William Becknell led a small group of men on a trading expedition from frontier Missouri to colonial Santa Fe. Mexico had recently declared its independence from Spain and abolished . . . — Map (db m34340) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — The Travelers
The Travelers For more than four decades, tens of thousands of travelers camped here. The Lone Elm campground was one or two nights out from the frontier "jumping off" points on the Missouri River. The great lone elm tree that gave this . . . — Map (db m34355) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Trail Campground..To Farm..To Park
In 1857, Newton Ainsworth claimed this land and allowed the trail travelers to continue camping here. A decade later, the railroads began to make their way west and the great overland trails became a part of history. The need for camping at Lone . . . — Map (db m34357) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Trails Westby Eldon Tefft
The oxen and Conestoga wagon sculpture was originally commissioned in 1994 for use at the Kansas Visitors Center at 119th & Strang Line Road. When the Center closed in 2002 the sculpture was awarded to the City of Olathe. The sculpture has been . . . — Map (db m34337) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Opening the Floodgates

[Inset] "from 'Sappling Grove' where there is an excellent fountain spring & a very good place to camp.. The road runs a little round on the high ridge."

The Santa Fe Trail began in 1821 when William Becknell and a . . . — Map (db m100228) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Santa Fe and Oregon Trails
Both the Santa Fe and Oregon Trails crossed here, northeast to southwest, beginning 1821. The trails took separate courses farther west. A route through Kansas Territory was opened north of here in the 1830's after the founding of Westport, Mo. Long . . . — Map (db m20213) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Two Routes from Westport

The Santa Fe Trail forked into two routes as it headed south from Westport. Along the routes were campgrounds for trail travelers — to the northeast of the junction was Sapling Grove and the southwest was a campground called Flat Rock or . . . — Map (db m100264) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Two Ways West from Westport

Imagine seeing Santa Fe Trail wagon trains coursing through Overland Park! Around you swirls the sights and sounds of wagons creaking, oxen braying, and wagon masters shouting commands. You are standing between two historic branches of the . . . — Map (db m99307) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Voices from the Trail

The Santa Fe, Oregon, and California trails proved to be both challenging and exhilarating for the travelers in the caravans passing through this junction along one of the Westport routes. Letters and diaries are filled with adventures and . . . — Map (db m100260) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Shawnee — Gum Springs
Located today at 59th Terrace and Bluejacket in the city of Shawnee, Gum Springs was the site of the Shawnee Indian church and meeting house, as well as the location of several excellent springs, all near the intersection of the Fort Leavenworth . . . — Map (db m50693) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Shawnee — The Development of the Kansas City area Frontier Trails NetworkTrail Map
The Santa Fe Trail went through two decades of change in the Kansas City area before evolving into it's final form by about 1840. In the early years of that decade it also became the route of the Oregon Trail and California Trail. 1821 - . . . — Map (db m50679) HM
Kansas (Leavenworth County), Fort Leavenworth — Santa Fe and Oregon Trails
This cut is part of the old Santa Fe Trail. Many years ago the Missouri River came near this site and thousands of early settlers were ferried here. Their wagons and teams climbed this hill and headed west toward Santa Fe and the Oregon . . . — Map (db m66712) HM
Kansas (Leavenworth County), Fort Leavenworth — The Oregon and Santa Fe Trails
The stone monuments to the west mark the trace of the original road leading up from the river. For many pioneers, traders, settlers and soldiers, this was the beginning of the Oregon and Santa Fe Trails leading to the Far West. The steamboat and . . . — Map (db m66713) HM
Kansas (Marshall County), Blue Rapids — A Quiet and Restful Place
To cross the high western mountains before the fall snow storms arrived, many emigrant wagon trains headed for the Oregon or California territories left Independence, Missouri, in mid April to early May. The downside to leaving too early often . . . — Map (db m79152) HM
Kansas (Marshall County), Blue Rapids — A Respite In The WildernessAlcove Spring
The water is of the most excellent kind. The spring is surrounded with Ash Cotton wood and Cedar trees. It is an excellent place to camp for a day or two to wash, recruit the cattle etc. I this day cut the name of the spring in the rock on . . . — Map (db m79134) HM
Kansas (Marshall County), Blue Rapids — Alcove Spring Park
Alcove Spring Park consists of more than 200 acres of native prairie and timber land maintained for the preservation of this historic camping ground on the Oregon-California trail and for the enjoyment of our visitors. The park is owned . . . — Map (db m79116) HM
Kansas (Marshall County), Blue Rapids — 26 — Alcove Springs & the Oregon Trail
Six miles northwest is Alcove Springs, named in 1846 by appreciative travelers on the Oregon trail who carved the name on the surrounding rocks and trees. One described the Springs as "a beautiful cascade of water... altogether one of the most . . . — Map (db m79113) HM
Kansas (Marshall County), Blue Rapids — The 1840s American DreamAlcove Spring
Stranded by heavy flood waters on the bank of the Big Blue River, 100 members of the Donner and Reed Wagon Train waited for several days anticipating that the spring runoff would begin to subside. Sarah Keyes, James Reed's mother-in-law, . . . — Map (db m79137) HM
Kansas (Pottawatomie County), St. Marys — Site of the Oregon Trail1830 - 1876
Over 300,000 persons passed along this trail in the years of its use to build an empire beyond our western frontier. — Map (db m34795) HM
Kansas (Pottawatomie County), St. Marys — 18 — St. Marys
This city and college take their name from St. Mary's Catholic Mission founded here by the Jesuits in 1848 for the Pottawatomie Indians. These missionaries, who had lived with the tribe in eastern Kansas from 1838, accompanied the removal to this . . . — Map (db m34785) HM
Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — Burial Site of Oregon Trail Traveler

Here lies an early traveler who lost his life in quest of riches in the West. — Map (db m80960) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — One Step at a Time

The Oregon Trail was the main street of the west from the 1830's to the completion of the first transcontinental railroad in 1869. Farmers, townsmen and restless Americans from all walks of life moved along this route seeking a better life in a . . . — Map (db m80948) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — Route of the Oregon Trail

Historians have estimated that between 250,000 and 300,000 emigrants used the Oregon Trail between 1840 and 1869. At least 30,000 emigrants died along the Oregon Trail, leaving an average of 15 graves for every mile of the trail. Disease, . . . — Map (db m80946) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — Scott Spring

The reservoir before you taps into the famous Scott Spring. The original outlet emanates from the base of a steep rock hill to the east. The refreshing water of Scott Spring offered abundant drinking water to many travelers on the Oregon Trail . . . — Map (db m80945) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — 20 — The California - Oregon Trail

From the 1830's to the 1870's, the 2,000-mile road connecting Missouri river towns with California and Oregon was America's greatest transcontinental highway. Several routes led west from the river, converging into one trail by the time the . . . — Map (db m80927) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — The Long Journey

The long journey overland to Oregon took about six months. Time, distance, and hardships seasoned the emigrants. They had the ability and had earned the right to mold their own destiny in the new land. The Oregon Trail became a vital part of . . . — Map (db m80949) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — The Wagon & Team • Supplies Needed

Wagons for trail travel were of the simplest construction. They cost $85.00 each. They were light, strong and carried on sturdy wheels. It was recommended that wheels be made of bois-d-oro, osage of orangewood or white oak. Bolt ends should be . . . — Map (db m80947) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — Wagons Fording Rock Creek

There were many unpredictable hazards on the trail as the wagon trains moved westward. The trail itself presented the worst problems. Streams had no bridges and had to be forded. Their shifting bottoms with pockets of quicksand were dangerous. . . . — Map (db m80959) HM

Kansas (Shawnee County), Topeka — 15 — Capital of Kansas
Topeka was founded in 1854 at the site of Papan's Ferry where a branch of the Oregon Trail crossed the Kansas river as early as 1842. Anti-slavery leaders framed the Topeka Constitution, 1855, in the first attempt to organize a state government. The . . . — Map (db m20479) HM
Missouri (Buchanan County), Saint Joseph — The California - Oregon Trail1840s & 1850s
Each spring thousands of emigrants camped in these hills and meadows waiting for new grass to support their teams along the trail. Wagons lined St. Joseph streets to the east waiting for two to three days to be ferried from this point. The settlers . . . — Map (db m47467) HM
Missouri (Buchanan County), Saint Joseph — The Journey West
After the 1848 discovery of gold in California, more than 100,000 sturdy Americans passed through St. Joseph on their way west in quest of wealth, opportunity and better lives. The "Gold Rush" began and those who followed the "Star of Empire" . . . — Map (db m47479) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Independence — Here the Oregon Trail Began
This monument honors the pioneer spirit of those courageous men and women who by their heroic trek across the continent established homes and civilization in the Far Northwest — Map (db m34753) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — McCoy's Trading Post
Near this point John McCoy built a log trading post in 1833 which launched the settlement of Westport, with the town becoming the westernmost point of American civilization. From Westport, the Santa Fe, California, and Oregon Trails reached out as . . . — Map (db m21064) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — New Santa Fe / Trail Remnants
(black marker) New Santa Fe, also known as Little Santa Fe, was not much more than an Indian settlement when the first wagon trains passed through on the Santa Fe Trail in the early 1820's. A popular stopping place because of its grass, . . . — Map (db m20724) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — The Albert G. Boone Store
(Main Marker) Originally used as an outfitting store for wagon trains, this building was completed in 1850 by Indian traders George and William Ewing and was sold in 1854 to Albert Gallatin Boone for $7,000. Boone operated the store . . . — Map (db m20921) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — Where Wagons Rolled / Wieduwilt Swales
Thousands of wagon wheels, animal hooves, and human feet once passed this way – creating the deep depression in front of you. The swale, now worn by erosion, is grassed-over evidence of three trails once connecting frontier Missouri to . . . — Map (db m87293) HM
Nebraska (Buffalo County), Kearney — Old Oregon Trail
. . . — Map (db m58815) HM
Nebraska (Deuel County), Big Springs — The Big Spring
Pioneers traveling west on the Oregon Trail discovered this spring that Plains Indians had frequented for centuries. It provided an oasis for man and beast alike in the “Great American Desert.’ In 1867, Union Pacific railroad workers named it . . . — Map (db m51461) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — 15 — Ash Hollow
Ash Hollow was famous on the Oregon Trail. A branch of the trail ran northwestward from the Lower California Crossing of the South Platte River a few miles west of Brule, and descended here into the North Platte Valley. The hollow, named for a . . . — Map (db m2503) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Windlass Hill entrance to Ash Hollow — Map (db m86674) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Trail 30 feet east — Map (db m86675) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — The Oregon Trail
      Travelers reached this point over the trail you see stretching out across the prairie to the southeast. They left the last real settlement at Westport Landing or at Independence, some 600 miles from here. Most of them took about 40 days to . . . — Map (db m87332) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — Wagon Ruts
      This ravine started as a set of wagon ruts cut through the grass and soil by heavy iron-shod wheels. It is but one example of the long interaction between man and the environment in this region.       This walk to the top of the hill has . . . — Map (db m87337) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — 130 — Windlass Hill Pioneer Homestead
The stones surrounding this marker are the remains of the homestead dwelling of Reverend Dennis B. Clary, a pioneer Methodist Minister, who received final patent for his homestead Mar 22, 1899. Mr. Clary was born September 1st 1822, in Maryland and . . . — Map (db m2501) HM
Nebraska (Keith County), Brule — 313 — California HillNebraska Historical Marker
The large hill to the north, which became known as “California Hill,” was climbed by thousands of covered wagon emigrants heading west between 1841 and 1860. Many were bound for Oregon. California became the destination of the majority . . . — Map (db m51229) HM
Nebraska (Keith County), Brule — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Old California River Crossing South 14 Degrees East — Map (db m51230) HM
Nebraska (Keith County), Ogallala — 7 — California Hill
Many emigrants to Oregon or California had to ford the South Platte River to continue their trek up the North Platte River to South Pass. The most important ford, known as the Old California Crossing, was a few miles west of present-day Ogallala. . . . — Map (db m50790) HM
Nebraska (Morrill County), Bayard — Chimney Rock Station
Seal of the National Pony Express Centennial Association Chimney Rock Station on the route of the Pony Express, was located near here between Chimney Rock and the North Platte River. This was an important Pony Express stop between . . . — Map (db m79423) HM
Nebraska (Morrill County), Bayard — The Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Chimney Rock S 56º 56’ W. 9041 Ft. — Map (db m86714) HM
Nebraska (Morrill County), Bridgeport — Oregon Trail
Oregon Trail Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 — Map (db m79390) HM
Nebraska (Platte County), Columbus — North Branch, Oregon Trail
Gratefully dedicated to early pioneers — Map (db m53149) HM
Nebraska (Scotts Bluff County), Gering — Oregon Trail Memorial
Honoring these and all the thousands who lie in nameless graves along the trail. Faith and courage such as theirs made America. May ours preserve it. — Map (db m78704) HM
Nebraska (Scotts Bluff County), Lyman — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Nebraska-Wyoming Monument N. 57º 40' W. 2086 ft — Map (db m98346) HM
Nebraska (Scotts Bluff County), Mitchell — Fort Mitchell, 1864-18671864 - 1867
In 1909 Nebraska State Surveyor Robert Harvey surveyed the Fort Mitchell site documenting the location of the fort for the Nebraska State Historical Society. Mr. Harvey’s site sketch is partially shown to the right. The granite Oregon Trail . . . — Map (db m79436) HM
Nebraska (Scotts Bluff County), Mitchell — 17 — Scott's Bluff Pony Express StationIn Search of the Pony Express Stations
Text is found on both sides of this marker Dedicated October 5, 2013 Scott’s Bluff Original Station Apr. 3, 1860 - Nov. 20. 1861 by James Stretesky Joseph L. Schroeder Panhandle Monument Gordy & Linda . . . — Map (db m79437) HM
Nebraska (Scotts Bluff County), Scottsbluff — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Trail passed 37 feet north of this Point. Mitchell Pass — Map (db m86670) HM
Nebraska (York County), York — Nebraska City Cut-Off of the Oregon Trail

This boulder marks the Nebraska City Cut-Off of the Oregon Trail — Map (db m79844) HM

Nebraska (York County), York — 174 — Nebraska City-Fort Kearny Cut-Off

Massive freighting of supplies by ox and mule trains was a direct result of the establishment of Fort Kearny and other western military posts. The Mormon War and the discovery of gold in the territories of Colorado and Montana increased this . . . — Map (db m79830) HM

Oregon (Multnomah County), Troutdale — Sandy River Bridge
On October 30, 1792 off the point in the Columbia River where the Sandy empties its waters, the boat crew from the H.M.S. Chatham (Vancouver's Voyages) were the first white men to sight the snowclad peak which Lt. Wm. R. Broughton named Mt. Hood in . . . — Map (db m38388) HM
Oregon (Sherman County), Wasco — Deschutes River Crossing
The Oregon Trail crossed the hazardous Deschutes River at this point by floating the prairie schooners and swimming the livestock. An island at the river mouth was often utilized when the water was high and the ford dangerous. Pioneer women and . . . — Map (db m34575) HM
Utah (Rich County), Garden City — The First Oregon Trail
The first covered wagons came into the Rocky Mts. in 1830, they made their way as far west as Fort Washakie in Wyoming. Efforts were made to find passable wagon trails through the Mountains to the Pacific Coast, which goal was finally reached. At . . . — Map (db m99320) HM
Washington (Clark County), Vancouver — A River of Settlers
Before 1846 American immigrants traveling the Oregon Trail to Fort Vancouver had to make a choice at The Dalles (80 miles upriver from here). They could navigate their own handmade raft or take a Hudson's Bay Company boat down the Columbia River to . . . — Map (db m12295) HM
Washington (Pierce County), Puyallup — Old Oregon Trail
Front of Marker: Monument Expedition Camp One 29 Jan 1906 Left Side of Marker: This stone is donated by Gregory L. Meeker Cousin to Ezra In honor of Bobby and Helen Meeker who taught their son the love of . . . — Map (db m39786) HM
Washington (Thurston County), Olympia — Marking the End of the Oregon Trail 1844
(Marker title is inscription.)Map (db m88854) HM
Washington (Walla Walla County), Walla Walla — Wai-i-lat-pu
A short distance to the south, near the Walla Walla River, is Wai-i-lat-pu, "The Place of the People of the Rye Grass,” a mission founded among the Cayuse Indians of the Walla Walla Valley in 1836 by Dr. Marcus Whitman and his wife, Narcissa. . . . — Map (db m3766) HM
Wyoming (Converse County), Douglas — Junction of the Oregon Trail
This Monument marks the junction of the Oregon Trail and road to Old Ft. Fetterman nine miles north of this spot. Established July 10, 1867. Abandoned May 25, 1882. — Map (db m92111) HM
Wyoming (Converse County), Douglas — Natural Bridge and the Oregon Trail
The Oregon Trail crosses LaPrele Creek about one mile downstream from Natural Bridge. Before the modern road was built into the gorge, Natural Bridge was difficult to access, and it was only rarely visited by emigrants of the covered wagon era. From . . . — Map (db m71495) HM
Wyoming (Converse County), Douglas — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Wyoming 1913 — Map (db m92112) HM
Wyoming (Converse County), Douglas — The Oregon Trail
The Oregon Trail 1841 four miles south Ft. Fetterman 1867 seven miles north Highway crosses Fetterman Trail route here. — Map (db m92110) HM
Wyoming (Converse County), Glenrock — Ada Magill
Caleb and Nancy Magill with their six children were part of a wagon train traveling fro Brown County, Kansas, to Dallas, Oregon, in 1864. After leaving Fort Laramie their three-year-old daughter Ada was taken sick with dysentery. At Deer Creek . . . — Map (db m92079) HM
Wyoming (Converse County), Glenrock — Alah H. Unthank
Nineteen-year-old Alvah Unthank was one of a group of young men who left Newport, Wayne County, Indiana, for the goldfields of California in 1850. On June 23 the wagon train passed Register Cliff, south of Guernsey. There Alvah inscribed his name: . . . — Map (db m92083) HM
Wyoming (Converse County), Glenrock — Deer Creek Station
Deer Creek Station, which once stood on the site of present- day Glenrock near the confluence of Deer Creek and the North Platte River, became a familiar landmark along the Oregon-California-Mormon Trail between 1857 and 1866. The station began . . . — Map (db m92081) HM
Wyoming (Converse County), Glenrock — Rock in the Glen
On July 26, 1842 John C. Fremont's first expedition to the far west guided by Kit Carson with Joseph Bissonette as interpreter, also L. Maxwell as hunter, camped in this rocky glen. Names and dates of many of the 300,000 travelers of the . . . — Map (db m92080) HM
Wyoming (Converse County), Glenrock — Sharp, Franklin and Taylor,
Three men named Sharp, Franklin, and Taylor, and one unknown man were killed by Indians July 12, 1864 where the Oregon Trail crosses Little Box Elder Creek 2 1/2 miles S.W. of here. They were buried 4 miles S.W. by the grave . . . — Map (db m92087) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Jeffrey City — Ice Slough
Ice Slough is a small stream that flows into the Sweetwater River five miles east of here. In front of this point is a slough (i.e. a marsh or shallow un-drained depression). This slough gave the name to the stream east of here. In the "Ice Slough" . . . — Map (db m62076) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Jeffrey City — Split Rock
Originally called the Emigrant Road, the Oregon Trail was the main route of westward expansion from 1812 to 1869. An estimated 500,000 people journeyed past here in search of new lands and new lives in the West. Because of its unique shape, . . . — Map (db m62092) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Jeffrey City — Split Rock
Split Rock was a relay station during the turbulent 18 month life of the Pony Express. The Express operated at a gallop, speeding mail across the West in only 10 days. However, because of the "talking wire," its days were numbered. The telegraph . . . — Map (db m69603) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Jeffrey City — Split Rock Meadows
Shoshone, Arapaho, Crow and Sioux Indians occupied this pleasant valley long before the Oregon Trail, which changed their cultures and life styles forever. This led to tragic warfare and the eventual loss of country they had called their own. . . . — Map (db m69602) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Jeffrey City — Trails to Opportunity
The Oregon Trail was American’s main street west. Building upon American Indians footpaths, emigrants bound for the Pacific Northwest used the trail. They were soon followed by Mormons fleeing persecution, gold seekers rushing to California and the . . . — Map (db m95744) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Lander — Narcissa Prentiss WhitmanEliza. Hart Spalding
Narcissa Prentiss Whitman. Eliza. Hart Spalding. First white women to cross this Pass July 4, 1836 — Map (db m80500) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Lander — Old Oregon Trail
Old Oregon Trail 1843-57 — Map (db m80503) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Lander — Oregon Buttes
To the south stand the Oregon Buttes, a major trail landmark. The name is significant because the Buttes were roughly the beginning of the Oregon Territory and also helped keep emigrants encouraged, even though there were still hundreds of miles of . . . — Map (db m80499) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Lander — South PassOn Top of the World
From where you're standing South Pass doesn't look all that remarkable. But compared to the rugged Wind River Mountains, it can easily be recognized as a type of gateway. Nevertheless, crossing the Continental Divide into "Oregon Country" was a . . . — Map (db m67020) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Lander — South Pass
Even after the discovery of South Pass in 1824, it was years before the route was used extensively. Fur trapper/trader William Sublette brought a small caravan of wagons to South Pass in 1828. While his party did not take wagons over the pass, they . . . — Map (db m67021) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Lander — South Pass
South Pass was discovered in 1812 by a small band of Astorians led by Robert Stuart as they traveled east with dispatches for John Jacob Astor. It was “rediscovered” in 1824 by a party led by Jedediah Smith as they searched for a winter . . . — Map (db m80501) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Lander — The Corridor West
The trail over South Pass is a transportation corridor which served many purposes. In addition to being the route to Oregon and California, it was used by Mormon pioneers and by the Pony Express. A great exodus to the Salt Lake Valley in 1847 . . . — Map (db m67019) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Lander — The Fur Trade
The demand for beaver pelts in the early 1800s led to the exploration and eventual settlement of the American West. South Pass was part of a major thoroughfare through the Rockies and its discovery is significant to the era known as the fur trade. . . . — Map (db m67022) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Lander — The Oregon Trail
The Oregon Trail In memory of those who passed this way to win and hold the West Plaque placed by the Historical Landmark Commission of Wyoming 1950 — Map (db m80504) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Lander — The Way West
With South Pass behind them, Oregon and California-bound travelers faced the second half of their journey. The roughest travel was yet to come. From Missouri to South Pass, emigrants were able to follow rivers. But from South Pass to Oregon and . . . — Map (db m67018) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), South Pass City — Lander Cut-Off on the Oregon Trail
In 1858, this ancient path, which had been used by Indians, explorers and mountain men as a short cut to the Snake River country was developed by Frederick Lander in to an alternate route on the Oregon Trail. What is commonly called the Lander Trail . . . — Map (db m80161) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), South Pass City — Pacific Springs
For many emigrants, the first tangible evidence that the had crossed South Pass was Pacific Springs, "the fountain source of the Pacific streams," according to pioneer Joseph Goldsborough Bruff. The broad expanse of the pass from Pacific Springs . . . — Map (db m96660) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), South Pass City — South Pass CityWyoming
Founded 1868 A Great Gold Camp Part of Wyoming’s historical heritage. Acquired for preservation May 18, 1966, with funds raised by Wyoming;s 75th Anniversary Commission Inc., its advisers, county committees and people of . . . — Map (db m80162) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Sweetwater Station — Oregon Trail1841
Continental Divide at South Pass 35 miles West — Map (db m95775) HM
Wyoming (Fremont County), Sweetwater Station — The Sweetwater Valley
The Sweetwater Valley is the mid-section of the 2000 mile-long Oregon Trail. West of Casper, Wyoming, branches of that trail, meld into a single transportation corridor and here, paralleling the serpentine Sweetwater River, the trail approaches the . . . — Map (db m95776) HM
Wyoming (Goshen County), Fort Laramie — Fort LaramieFort Laramie National Historic Site
A military post on the Oregon Trail June 16, 1849-March 2, 1890. This monument is erected by the State of Wyoming and a few interested residents — Map (db m100065) HM
Wyoming (Goshen County), Fort Laramie — Mary Elizabeth Homsley
Mary Elizabeth Homsley was born near Lexington, Kentucky, July 20, 1824. She move with her parents, Jacob and Sarah Oden, to Truxton, Missouri, where she was married to Benjamin Franklin Homsley in 1841. In April 1852, accompanied by Mary's parents . . . — Map (db m98361) HM
Wyoming (Goshen County), Fort Laramie — 49 — Mormon Pioneers at Fort Laramie
Between the years 1847 and 1868, most of the approximate 80,000 Mormon Pioneers passed through Fort Laramie. This was the first stop for the vanguard company after leaving Winter Quarters, (near Omaha) Nebraska. In June, 1847, after following a . . . — Map (db m79776) HM
Wyoming (Goshen County), Fort Laramie — The Journey West Continues
"We proceeded (westward from Fort Laramie) and encamped outside the boundaries of Uncle Sam." So wrote Dr. J.S. Shepard in 1851 as he began the second leg of his journey west. "To leave Fort Laramie was to cast off all ties with civilization. It was . . . — Map (db m98360) HM
Wyoming (Goshen County), Lingle — Oregon Trail
Oregon Trail Marked by the State of Wyoming 1914 — Map (db m79741) HM
Wyoming (Goshen County), Lingle — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Wyoming 1914 — Map (db m98359) HM
Wyoming (Goshen County), Lingle — To All Pioneers
To all Pioneers who passed this way to win and hold the West Trail crossed one mile South — Map (db m79742) HM
Wyoming (Goshen County), Torrington — Cold Springs
3/4 mile east from this point Cold Springs was a popular camping ground on the Overland Trail to California, Oregon, Utah and other points in the far west. It was a stage station along the Overland Stage Route 1854-1862 and also a Pony Express . . . — Map (db m79702) HM
Wyoming (Goshen County), Torrington — Oregon Trail
To all the pioneers who passed this way to win and hold the West — Map (db m98344) HM
Wyoming (Goshen County), Torrington — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Wyoming 1914 — Map (db m98345) HM
Wyoming (Goshen County), Torrington — The Oregon Trail
Entered Wyoming at this point 1841 Main trail 3 miles South — Map (db m79699) HM
Wyoming (Lincoln County), Cokeville — Old Oregon Trail
used from 1812 to 1912 Monument erected by Ezra Meeker — Map (db m90452) HM
Wyoming (Lincoln County), Kemmerer — Oregon Trail Memorial
To All Pioneers Who Passed This Way To Win and Hold The West Erected By Popular Subscription Citizens of Kemmerer 1931 — Map (db m36650) HM
Wyoming (Lincoln County), La Barge — Names Hill State Historic Site
Names Hill is one of three prominent sites in Wyoming where travelers inscribed their names into stone along the emigrant trails. The other sites are Register Cliff and Independence Rock. After crossing a 40 miles stretch of waterless desert, wagon . . . — Map (db m80533) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Alcova — A Tribute to Hardship
Thousands of pioneers journeyed over 1,000 miles to reach this point. Illness and death were common. Everywhere along the trail people died and were buried. It is estimated that one out of ten emigrants who started on the trail died before . . . — Map (db m95503) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Alcova — Devil's Gate
The Legend of Devil’s Gate American Indian legend says a powerful evil spirit in the form of a tremendous beast with enormous tusks ravaged the Sweetwater Valley, preventing the Indians from hunting and camping. A holy man told the . . . — Map (db m95488) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Alcova — Following the River
From here to Split Rock, a day's journey west, the Oregon Trail followed two routes; one close to the Sweetwater River, and the other a little further from it but more direct. Capt. Howard Stansbury commented August 1, 1852: "...Frost . . . — Map (db m95515) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Alcova — Frederick Richard Fulkerson
The grave of F.R. Fulkerson was noted by forty-niner J.G. Bruff on July 26, 1849, as he traveled through what he termed "Pass of the Rattle-Snake Mountain to the left of Devil's Gate." The survival of the large granite boulder used as the Fulkerson . . . — Map (db m66997) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Alcova — Independence Rock
Thousands who traveled the Oregon Trail in central Wyoming were unaware that they were the beneficiaries of a long series of geological events. The granite peaks around you are mountains that rose, sank and then were buried in sand and ashy . . . — Map (db m62149) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Alcova — Independence Rock
Probably discovered by returning Astorians, 1812. Given its name by emigrants who celebrated Independence Day here July 4, 1825. Capt. Bonneville passed here with first wagons 1832. Whitman and Spalding, missionaries with their wives stopped here . . . — Map (db m95548) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Alcova — Oregon Trail
Marked by State of Wyoming 1914 — Map (db m95549) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Alcova — The Emigrant Road
The Oregon Trail passed over the ridge to the east of Devil's Gate. Good grass, water and the shelter of the hills made this a popular campsite. Explorer Brevet-Captain John C. Fremont, 1842: "In about three miles, we reached the . . . — Map (db m95504) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Alcova — The Oregon Trail1841
Devil's Gate One-fourth Mile East. Split Rock 20 miles Northwest. — Map (db m95481) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Alcova — The Ox-Team Monument Expedition
In 1852 an estimated 50,000 pioneers passed Independence Rock on their way west. Among this number was the family of 21-year-old Ezra Meeker, recently of Eddyville, Iowa, but natives of Indiana. Meeker, his wife Eliza, and their infant son, arrived . . . — Map (db m95546) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Alcova — The Preservation of Independence Rock
An important landform like Independence Rock is protected and preserved only through the efforts of many people and organizations. Not all attempts at preservation and commemoration are acceptable by current standards, however, and some actions left . . . — Map (db m95551) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Bessemer Bend — A Look Back
Daunting to some, invigorating to others, the view from here gave emigrants a sense of the dramatic beauty and grand scale of the West. Many pioneers, tired after having climbed four hundred feet above Willow Springs, were humbled by this panorama. . . . — Map (db m95598) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Bessemer Bend — And On the Horizon...
"Sunday Jun 15. Traveled 25 miles, about one mile from the springs is Prospect Hill. It is a delightful view, and here you can see the range of Sweet water mountains..." Excerpt from the 1851 journal of Amelia Hadley in Covered Wagon . . . — Map (db m95597) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Bessemer Bend — First Among Many
Throughout history, humans have followed river banks in search of resources to support commerce. Rivers made possible the exploration and mapping of North America. Major waterways served as trade routes for native peoples, corridors for European . . . — Map (db m91949) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Bessemer Bend — Lure of the West
The eighteenth century brought competition among Spain, France, England and the fledgling Unites States for control of North America. Domain over the continent's rivers, seaports, forests, rich soils, and wildlife resources was key to the growth of . . . — Map (db m95596) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Bessemer Bend — Red Buttes
of Oregon Trail fame, where westward travelers left the North Platte River. A Tribute to Pioneer Emigrants from Casper Literary Club 1930 — Map (db m91946) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Bessemer Bend — Reluctant Farewells
In this location wagons, carts, livestock, and emigrants forded the North Platte River during organized migrations through the Rocky Mountain West. Congressional prodding to occupy the Oregon Territory in the early 1840s, and the lure of fertile, . . . — Map (db m91971) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Bessemer Bend — The Oregon Trail1841
Oregon Trail approximately four miles north, on bend of North Platte visible to the north. Robert Stuart in 1812 erected the first white man's cabin in Wyoming. — Map (db m92014) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Bessemer Bend — Willow SpringsWillow Springs Pony Express Station
After the last crossing of the North Platte River in the present Casper area, twenty to twenty-five miles east of here, wagons followed the Oregon-California Trail entered a dry, dreary alkali area where fresh water was scarce. Willow Springs was . . . — Map (db m95592) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Casper — Guinard Bridge
The center piece of the Platte Bridge Station and Fort Caspar was the bridge built here by Louis Guinard in 1859-1860 and used until Fort Caspar was abandoned in 1867. The bridge superstructure stood on 28 timber cribbings filled with rock and . . . — Map (db m91712) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Casper — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Wyoming 1914 — Map (db m91661) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Casper — Oregon-California TrailC.H. King and Company
Two plaques and a medallion are located at this site: Oregon- California Trail During the years 1841-1867 over 350,000 persons passed through Casper on their way West. The majority of them traveled through what is now the lobby . . . — Map (db m92022) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Casper — Richard Bridge and Military Complex
The military camps and Richard Bridge were located in the bend of the North Platte River about one-half mile north of Evansville, Wyoming. Locally known as Reshaw’s Bridge, the area is marked by a historical sign. John Richard (Reshaw) . . . — Map (db m91811) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Casper — Site of Old Platte Bridge
Built by Louis Gurnard 1858-59 Immediately south and west are the sites of Platte Bridge Station, First Overland Telegraph, Stage, and Pony Express Stations on the Old Oregon Trail opposite side: One half mile north and . . . — Map (db m91710) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Mills — Emigrant Gap Historical Site
Many emigrant pioneers passed through this gap, or opening, in Emigrant Ridge between the 1840’s and the 1880’s as they traveled the Oregon-Mormon Trail by oxen-drawn wagons, on horseback, or on foot. The trail generally followed the North Platte . . . — Map (db m92013) HM
Wyoming (Natrona County), Mills — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Wyoming 1914 Lieutenant Caspar W. Collins killed by Sioux Indians near this spot July 26, 1865 — Map (db m92011) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Glendo — Horseshoe Creek Pony Express Station
530 yards south east of this monument on the Oregon Trail was the site of Horseshoe Creek Pony Express and U.S. Military telegraph and stage station built in 1860. — Map (db m92130) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Glendo — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Wyoming 1913 — Map (db m92128) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Encampments in the Guernsey Area
By wagon, encampments in the Guernsey area, are a day's trek from Fort Laramie. Emigrants had three choices of camp sites in the Guernsey area: Register Cliff, Warm Springs or Cold Springs, the farthest encampment. Lieutenant John C. Fremont's . . . — Map (db m85773) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Firewood & Cool Water
Called Bitter Cottonwood Creek because of the groves of cottonwood trees growing there, this location was a welcome relief for emigrant pioneers as they traveled along the relatively treeless road to the west in the 1840s, 50s, & 60s. Many pioneer . . . — Map (db m98377) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Forts, Stations, and Camps
Two plaque, under the same name, described military forts and stations on the Wyoming's Platte River section of the Oregon Trail. Panel 1:
There were four forts, numerous stations, and camps along the Oregon-California-Mormon . . . — Map (db m85769) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Historic Guernsey Area
Platted and established by the Lincoln Land Company of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, Guernsey garners its name from Charles A. Guernsey, noted legislator, rancher, and investor in early Wyoming. The historic Guernsey area . . . — Map (db m79807) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Lock and Roll Down a Rocky Road
The historic Oregon Trail descends from the benchlands across the valley to the river bottom below. Brigham Young’s 1847 Company of Mormon Pioneers crossed the south side of the North Platte River near Fort Laramie to follow the Oregon Trail past . . . — Map (db m79834) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Oregon Trail
. . . — Map (db m79833) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Wyoming 1913 — Map (db m98376) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Oregon Trail
At this point the Oregon Trail crossed. — Map (db m98378) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Oregon Trail RutsRegistered National Historic Landmark
Wagon wheels cut solid rock, carving a memorial to Empire Builders. what manner of men and beasts impelled conveyances weighting on those griding wheels? Look! A line of shadows crossing boundless wilderness. Foremost, nimble mules drawing . . . — Map (db m5748) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Oregon Trail Ruts State Historic SiteThe Trail West — A Difficult Journey
Three panels are found at the Park Kiosk near the parking lot. The Trail West During the mid-1800s, more than 500,000 pioneers journeyed west. Never more than a rocky, rutted trail, the road west began in Missouri, crossing . . . — Map (db m85924) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Register Cliff
The wayfarer's penchant for inscribing names and dates on prominent landmarks excites the interest of his descendants. Regrettably, marks of historic value are often effaced by later opportunists. Along the Oregon Trail, famed transcontinental . . . — Map (db m5749) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Register Cliff State Historic Site
Three panels are located at the Register Cliff State Historic Site kiosk. Register Cliff State Historic Site West of Register Cliff the landscape changes, presenting new challenges for the emigrants. Limited water and rugged . . . — Map (db m79836) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — Rifle Pit HillCold Springs Camping Ground
Rock quarries, visible from several points near this location, were used beginning in 1849 to supply stone and lime for construction projects at Fort Laramie, about 15 miles east. Workers in the quarries were protected by soldiers stationed in . . . — Map (db m85753) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — The Oregon Trail1841
Cold Spring camping ground. Rifle pits on brow of hill 500 feet north. Erected by the Historical Landmark Commission of Wyoming 1943Map (db m86711) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — The United States Army and the Oregon Trail
The U.S. Army's Role in Protecting the Oregon Trail in Wyoming 1842 to 1870 Lieutenant John C. Fremont led an expedition west in 1842 to map a route to Oregon Territory. The scout, Kit Carson, guided the expedition. Lieutenant . . . — Map (db m85771) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Guernsey — The US Army’s Role in Protecting the Oregon Trail is Best Described by the Soldiers
Three plaques, under the same title, describe how the U.S. Army protected immigrants on the Oregon Trail. Panel 1: “If it is in contemplation to keep open communications with Oregon Territory, a show of military force in this . . . — Map (db m85766) HM
Wyoming (Platte County), Wheatland — Laramie Peak
As you journey through Wyoming, you are one of the countless travelers who has looked out to the west and seen the granite rising of Laramie Peak. Near Scottsbluff, Nebraska, approximately 80 miles east of Dwyer Junction, emigrants witnessed their . . . — Map (db m98380) HM
Wyoming (Sublette County), Farson — "Parting of the Ways"
This marks a fork in the trail, right to Oregon, left to Utah and California. 1812, Robert Stuart and eastbound Astorians used South Pass gateway. 1824, Eleven westbound Ashley-Henry men led by Jedediah Smith and Thomas Fitzpatrick. . . . — Map (db m67035) HM
Wyoming (Sublette County), Farson — Parting of the Ways
Trail ruts at this site were mistakenly identified as the Parting-of-the-Ways where emigrant parties separated on their journeys to Oregon, California, or Utah. The actual Parting-of-the-Ways is approximately 10 miles west of this spot. Where . . . — Map (db m67034) HM
Wyoming (Sublette County), Farson — Parting of the Ways
This point on the trail is called the Parting-of-the-Ways. The trail to the right is the Sublette or Greenwood Cutoff and to the left is the main route of the Oregon, Mormon, and California Trails. The Sublette Cutoff was opened in 1844 because it . . . — Map (db m96684) HM
Wyoming (Sublette County), Farson — The Parting of the Ways
In July 1844 the California bound Stevens-Townsend-Murphy wagon train, guided by Isaac Hitchcock and 81-year old Caleb Greenwood, passed this point and continued nine and one half miles southwest from here, to a place destined to become prominent in . . . — Map (db m67036) HM
Wyoming (Sweetwater County), Farson — "Graves" of the Unknown Emigrants
Graves were an all-to-frequent reminder of the dangers of overland travel. Most emigrant journals record death, burial, or passing graves during the day's travel. Most burials along the trail were hasty affairs. The official Company Journal of . . . — Map (db m67045) HM
Wyoming (Sweetwater County), Farson — Burial on the Trail
Death on the trail did not allow for the fineries of the funerals back home. Emigrants made do with materials available. Black would adorn the clothes of mourners, and care would be taken to provide the best funeral possible. The most travelers . . . — Map (db m67044) HM
Wyoming (Sweetwater County), Farson — Continuing the Journey West
Just a few miles from where you're standing, the emigrants would come to the first of several trail "splits" that would take them to a crossing on the Green River where they would camp for the evening. Even with South Pass behind them, Oregon . . . — Map (db m67043) HM
Wyoming (Sweetwater County), Farson — Crossing the Green RiverThe Oregon Trail
Crossing rivers was the most dangerous activity emigrants faced on their journey west. By the time weary pioneers enroute (sic) to Oregon, California, or Utah reached the east bank of the Green River, they had been on the trail for several months. . . . — Map (db m90015) HM
Wyoming (Sweetwater County), Farson — Death on the Trail
Death was a constant companion for emigrants headed west. It is estimated that 10,000 to 30,000 people died and were buried along the trails between 1843 and 1869. Cholera and other diseases were the most common cause of death. People didn't . . . — Map (db m67046) HM
Wyoming (Sweetwater County), Farson — Emigrant/Indian Relations
Relations between emigrants using the trails and the Indians were inconsistent during the migration period. While hostile acts and violent confrontation did occur, they have been overemphasized in trail history. During the early migration period of . . . — Map (db m67049) HM
Wyoming (Sweetwater County), Farson — Little Sandy Crossing
This spot where the old Oregon and Mormon Trails cross the Little Sandy River (or Creek) was a popular camping and resting place for travelers headed to Oregon, California and Utah. Indeed, this site is one of the most significant landmarks on the . . . — Map (db m96697) HM
Wyoming (Sweetwater County), Farson — One Day at a TimeThe Oregon Trail
For the hundreds of people heading west, life was one day at a time. The travelers had settled into the monotonous routine of life on the trail - up before dawn, an early breakfast, hitch up the stock, and begin the day's journey. Upon safely . . . — Map (db m90035) HM
Wyoming (Sweetwater County), Farson — Pilot Butte & "Graves" of the Unknown Emigrants
Welcome to the Pilot Butte Emigrant Trails Interpretive Site. The purpose of the site is to help you gain a sense of what life was like for the 400,000 emigrants who left their homes to seek a new life in the West. They were seeking wealth, . . . — Map (db m67042) HM
Wyoming (Sweetwater County), Farson — The Lombard Ferry
This site of the Lombard Ferry was one of the most used crossings on the Green River, lasting from about 1843 into the early 1900s. First established by mountain men, it was operated by Mormons in the 1850s during the peak years of the westward . . . — Map (db m88473) HM
Wyoming (Sweetwater County), Granger — Old South Bend Stage Station
. . . — Map (db m80309) HM

201 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers were listed. Next 1
Paid Advertisement