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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Oregon Trail Historical Markers

The Oregon Trail was the only practical corridor to reach the entire western United States from 1836 – 1869. Over half a million people went west during the Oregon Trail’s “glory years.”310 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 110
 
Oregon Trail Marker image, Touch for more information
By Barry Swackhamer, December 1, 2014
Oregon Trail Marker
Colorado (Sedgwick County), Julesburg — Oregon Trail
South of river Old Julesberg Stage and Pony Express Station, 5 mi. S.W. Trail and station marked 1931 — Map (db m79879) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — "Our Road Was Very Steep..."
"... we found a gap in the bluffs of Boise valley, where we turned down and succeeded in reaching the valley in safety, although our road was very steep and stony, and long..." -- P.V. Crawford, 1851 P.V. Crawford may have written . . . — Map (db m125856) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — 359 — Beaver Dick's Ferry
In 1863 and 1864, overland packers hauling supplies from Salt Lake City to Idaho City crossed here and took a direct route northward to More's Creek. They cut a steep grade from the Oregon Trail down to Beaver Dick's Ferry, which served a . . . — Map (db m22641) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — Bonneville Point — The Oregon Trail
From the high ridge above the Boise River 5 miles southwest of here, westward-bound travelers got their first view of the Boise Valley. In 1811, Wilson Price Hunt and the Overland Astorians' party were the first white sojourners to enjoy the scene. . . . — Map (db m119002) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — Ezra Meeker — The Oregon Trail
In 1906, at the age of seventy-five, Ezra Meeker began a journey east from his home in Puyallup, Washington, to retrace the route of the Oregon Trail over which he originally traveled in 1852 with his wife and young son. He traveled the route with a . . . — Map (db m118993) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — Idaho's Emigrant Trails — The Oregon Trail
Westward-bound emigrants entered Idaho after crossing Thomas Fork Valley. They soon encountered the climb and descent of Big Hill, witnessed nature's curiosities at Soda Springs, and discovered willing traders at Fort Hall. In 1843 wagons . . . — Map (db m118992) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — Kelton Road — The Oregon Trail
After the transcontinental railroad was completed on May 10, 1869, new stage and freight routes were established to connect southwester Idaho with newly established railheads. Kelton, Utah, soon became the main shipping point for Boise, when John . . . — Map (db m118996) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — Old Oregon Trail
Along this historic trail, from 1841 to 1861, traveled the greatest land migration in history. Nearly half a million pioneers came to settle America's Northwest. One out of every eight would perish along the way. — Map (db m125859) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — Old Oregon Trail - West Boise
Between 1843 and 1869 over 300,000 emigrants fulfilled Americas's Manifest Destiny by voluntarily relocating to Oregon and California. Their nearly 2,000 mile journey along game trails long used by the early Native Americans would become known as . . . — Map (db m119239) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — 375 — Oregon Trail
Indians, trappers, and emigrants who came this way before 1900 used a more direct route to get between Boise and Glenns Ferry. Their road still can be seen at Bonneville Point 5 miles from here. Following close to a line of hills bordering a . . . — Map (db m22181) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — 10 — Site 10 ★ Blacks Creek Road Crossing
Wednesday September 15th "Today we traveled up a long hill some 4 miles. Road good, ascent very gradual. When we arrived at the top we got a grand view of the Boise River Valley. It is all filled or covered with dry grass and a few trees . . . — Map (db m125787) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — 151 — The Oregon Trail
The Oregon Trail is still clearly visible coming off the rimrock across the river. Here the west bound emigrants after 1840 came gratefully down into this green valley. The first cart passed here with Spalding and Whitman, pioneer missionaries, . . . — Map (db m22639) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — Wheels of Change
"When we first came in sight of Boise City and valley we were upon a hill seven miles distant." -- Julius Caesar Merrill, 1864 Creaking, groaning wheels, the dust so thick that the hunch-back oxen ahead looked more like tawny . . . — Map (db m125861) HM
Idaho (Ada County), Boise — Whitman Overlook
(Three Panels are found at this overlook:) "The River Boise..." "Descending some steep hills we came down on the river 'Boisee,' which deserved its appellation from the dense fringes of cottonwood and willow trees that . . . — Map (db m125862) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Bloomington — 319 — British Settlers — Bear Lake — LDS Church
Most early Bear Lake settlers came from Britain. One was the first woman convert to the LDS church in Europe.

Born in Preston, England, Aug. 24, 1806. Ann Elizabeth Walmsley Palmer was baptized July 30, 1837. An invalid, she was carried into the . . . — Map (db m99318) HM

Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — 335 — Big Hill
On their way west to Oregon and California, emigrant wagons often crossed high ridges in order to avoid gullies and canyons. When he came here in 1843, Theodore Talbot noted that he "had to cross a very high hill, which is said to be the . . . — Map (db m90807) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — Big Hill
"... the greatest impediment on the whole route from the United States to Fort Hall." - Theodore Talbot, 1843 Near the Wyoming/Idaho border the pioneers face Big Hill, on of the most challenging obstacles of their journey. The dusty . . . — Map (db m90854) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — Big Hill...
"the steepest and longest ascent we have made on the route..." - James Wilkins Looking east across the fields is Big Hill, one of the most difficult obstacles along the 2,000-mile Oregon/California Trail. The trail crosses the Thomas . . . — Map (db m90851) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — Hot, Cold, Dry, Wet, Dusty, 2,000-Mile Trail
Beginning in Independence, Missouri, the Oregon/California Trail passes through present-day Missouri, Kansas, Wyoming, and Idaho. it ends in Oregon, California or Utah - depending on the destination of the pioneers. While the . . . — Map (db m90876) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — Idaho's Emigrant Trails
Westward-bound emigrants entered Idaho after crossing Thomas Fork Valley. They soon encountered the climb and descent of Big Hill, witnessed nature's curiosities at Soda Springs, and discovered willing traders at Fort Hall. In 1843 wagons first . . . — Map (db m90852) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — 456 — McAuley's Road
Coming west with Ezra Meeker in 1852, Thomas McAuley decided to build a road to let emigrants bypass Big Hill. Worst of all Oregon Trail descents, Big Hill needed replacement. Eliza McAuley reported that her brother Tom "fished awhile, . . . — Map (db m90808) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — One Continual Stream
"One continual stream of honest looking open harted people going west" - James Cayman, mountain man, captured this sentiment in his diary as he watched pioneers heading west in 1846. Between 1841 and 1869 nearly 300,000 farmers, . . . — Map (db m90853) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — 159 — Smith's Trading Post
In 1848, Pegleg Smith established a trading post on the Oregon Trail at Big Timber somewhere near here on the river. Some travelers called it "Fort Smith", though it had only four log cabins and some Indian lodges. Packing a plow and tools . . . — Map (db m90805) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — The McAuley Cutoff
On April 7, 1852, seventeen-year-old Eliza Ann McAuley, with her older brother Thomas and sister Margaret, left Mount Pleasant, Iowa, to travel overland to California. For a time they were accompanied by the "Eddyville Company," led by William Buck . . . — Map (db m90850) HM
Idaho (Bear Lake County), Montpelier — 157 — Thomas Fork
A bad ford gave trouble to wagon trains crossing this stream on the trail to California and Oregon in 1849. In that year, gold-seeking 49'ers developed a shortcut that crossed here. Then emigrants built two bridges here in 1850. But an . . . — Map (db m90804) HM
Idaho (Blaine County), Bellevue — Timmerman Junction Oregon Trail Kiosk
(Five panels in the kiosk deal with the history of Goodale's Cutoff and the surrounding area) Idaho's Emigrant Trails Westward-bound emigrants entered Idaho after crossing Thomas Fork Valley. They soon encountered the climb . . . — Map (db m110138) HM
Idaho (Blaine County), Carey — 305 — Goodale's Cutoff
An old emigrant road headed west across Camas Prairie and then descended to the valley below on its way to rejoin the Oregon Trail 28 miles west of here. This route, discovered by Donald Mackenzie's fur trade party in 1820, came into use for . . . — Map (db m123920) HM
Idaho (Canyon County), Caldwell — 455 — Emigrant Crossing
After reaching Boise River, emigrant wagons had to travel 30 miles to find a good crossing about 1/4 mile north of here. They had to avoid a wide zone of shifting channels, so they descended Canyon Hill where the route is still visible. In . . . — Map (db m22326) HM
Idaho (Canyon County), Middleton — 75 — The Ward Massacre
Only 2 young boys survived the Indian attack on Alexander Ward's 20 member party, Oregon bound on August 20, 1854. Military retaliation for the slaughter so enraged the Indians that Hudson's Bay Co. posts Fort Boise and Fort Hall had to be . . . — Map (db m22328) HM
Idaho (Canyon County), Parma — 85 — Old Fort Boise
An important Hudson's Bay Company fur trade post was established in 1834 four miles west of here on the bank of the Snake River. Fur trading declined, but this British post became famous for its hospitality to American travellers on the Oregon . . . — Map (db m21992) HM
Idaho (Caribou County), Bancroft — 161 — Hudspeth's Cutoff
In the summer of 1849, the California Gold Rush was diverted this way in search of a more direct route to the mines. Stampeding 49'ers would try anything to save miles and time in their rush for California's gold: the regular Oregon and . . . — Map (db m106774) HM
Idaho (Caribou County), Bancroft — 324 — Oregon Trail Campsite
After the arrival of the first settlers of Chesterfield in 1875, covered wagon trains continued to use the Old Oregon Traill of 1846 which passed this point. Tired discouraged and ill, travelers arrived here from early spring to late autumn. Local . . . — Map (db m124580) HM
Idaho (Caribou County), Soda Springs — Fort Hall
For over two decades (1834-1856), fur trappers and Oregon Trail wagon trains passed by the doors of this adobe fort. Nathaniel Wyeth, an ambitious Bostonian, built the post in 1834 but soon sold his holdings to the Hudson's Bay Company, whose staff . . . — Map (db m106849) HM
Idaho (Caribou County), Soda Springs — Guiding Landmark... — Sheep Rock
Towering 1200 feet above the waters of Bear River is Sheep Rock, a prominent landmark described in emigrant diaries and journals as they traveled west on the Oregon and California trails. Trapper and mountain men, in the early 1830s, indicate that a . . . — Map (db m106737) HM
Idaho (Caribou County), Soda Springs — Hudspeth Cutoff
Native Americans traveled and camped in the Soda Springs area for centuries before emigrants traveled the Oregon Trail. Sheep Rock (Soda Point) marked the junction of the main route of the Oregon-California Trail and the Hudspeth Cutoff and was . . . — Map (db m106850) HM
Idaho (Caribou County), Soda Springs — Idaho's Emigrant Trails
Westward-bound emigrants entered Idaho after crossing Thomas Fork Valley. They soon encountered the climb and decent of Big Hill, witnessed nature's curiosities at Soda Springs, and discovered willing traders at Fort Hall. In 1843 wagons first . . . — Map (db m106845) HM
Idaho (Caribou County), Soda Springs — 219 — John Bidwell
In 1840, John Bidwell began to assemble emigrants from Missouri to open a road to California; and a year later, he set out with a party of 69 Pacific Coast pioneers. When they reached here, August 12, 1841, half of this group decided to go . . . — Map (db m106729) HM
Idaho (Caribou County), Soda Springs — Sheep Rock Geology
Lava eruptions west of Sheep Rock at least 140,000 years ago blocked the Bear River from draining into the Snake River system. Instead, the Bear was forced to drain into what was then Lakes Thatcher and Bonneville to the south. The Bear River's . . . — Map (db m106847) HM
Idaho (Caribou County), Soda Springs — The Value Of A Shortcut — Hudspeth's Cutofff
When they left the main trail leading to Fort Hall, emigrants heading to California thought that Hudspeth's Cutoff would save them considerable time and miles in the race to the gold fields. To their surprise, they were still in Idaho's Raft River . . . — Map (db m106772) HM
Idaho (Caribou County), Soda Springs — Trails, Rails and Highways
This is an east-west travel corridor of the earliest emigrant trails that continued even after the arrival of railroads and highways. Early explorers, such as John Fremont, Jedediah Smith, Osborne Russell, and missionary Narcissi Whitman were among . . . — Map (db m106846) HM
Idaho (Caribou County), Soda Springs — William Henry Harrison
Oregon Trail Memorial Erected 1931 Restored 1978 Caribou County 4H Builders Club In honor of William Henry Harrison of Massachusetts who lost his life on the Oregon Trail about 1850. Erected by his niece Mrs. Alura F. . . . — Map (db m106732) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — "A Most Dangerous Crossing"
"...we rode as much as half mile in crossing and against the current too, which made it hard for the horses, the water being up to their sides. Husband had considerable difficultly in crossing the cart. Both cart and mules were turned upside . . . — Map (db m125673) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — Motor Homes Without Motors
Contrary to popular belief, the emigrant wagon was not the large heavy Conestoga that is represented by the Idaho Bicentennial Wagon. Instead, many people used wagons from their farms or purchased smaller, lighter wagons at the start of their . . . — Map (db m125727) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — 198 — Oregon Trail
A perilous ford at Three Island State Park was a formidable Oregon Trail barrier. Those who could not cross here faced a longer, more difficult southern route. No other ford between Missouri and Oregon troubled them so much. This was their largest . . . — Map (db m31677) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — Over 500 Miles Step-by-Step — The Oregon Trail in Idaho
Stretching from Independence, Missouri, to Oregon City, the two thousand mile Oregon Trail lured over 300,000 pioneers on a long six month journey. When pioneers entered present-day Idaho, many had traveled more than one thousand miles of hot, dusty . . . — Map (db m125674) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — 1 — Site 1 ★ Two Island Crossing — Main Oregon Trail Back County Byway
Thursday July 24 "Traveled 13 miles struck the river 2 miles above the ford. Here we found a company ferrying in wagon beds we unloaded two our best wagon beds and commenced calking them got them finished and ferried their loads that . . . — Map (db m125677) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — 2 — Site 2 ★ Old Oregon Trail Road Crossing — Main Oregon Trail Back County Byway
Thursday August 14 "...We had a squally time ascending the bluffs, which are severaly hundred feet high. We passed from a hill to the side of a bluff, upon a high narrow ridge of just sufficient width upon the top for the wagon road, the . . . — Map (db m125733) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — 3 — Site 3 ★ Hot Springs Creek — Main Oregon Trail Back County Byway
Sunday July 27 "Traveled 15 miles 5 miles brought us to a marshy hollow (Hot Springs Creek) which wound to right of the direction were traveling. Traveled in this marsh 3 miles then drove out leaving this marsh to our right..." -- Susan . . . — Map (db m125751) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — The Oregon Trail
Directly in front of you, the Oregon Trail descends the steep bluff to the Snake River. The trail lies parallel to and directly above the major road scar that is easily seen. On sunny days, the trail is visible to the keen eye. While the . . . — Map (db m125725) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — The Three Island Ford
Located on an old Indian and fur trade route, the Three Island Ford presented a difficult challenge to the emigrants. Those who dared attempted this crossing using the southern two islands and connecting sand bars to cross the river. Those who were . . . — Map (db m125726) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Glenns Ferry — To All Pioneers
To all pioneers who crossed over Three Island Crossing and helped to win the west. Erected 1931 by Troop One Boy Scouts of America Roslyn, New York Scoutmaster E.K. Pietsch Reproduced 1990Map (db m31679) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Mountain Home — 353 — Castle Rock
Up toward Camas Prairie, a road goes by Castle Rock and other eroded granite outcrops that were landmarks on Goodale's Cutoff, an Oregon Trail route that came this way. Emigrants generally had not seen large granite rock formations of this . . . — Map (db m110143) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Mountain Home — 305 — Goodale's Cutoff
An old emigrant road headed west across Camas Prairie and then descended to the valley below on its way to rejoin the Oregon Trail 28 miles west of here. This route, discovered by Donald Mackenzie's fur trade party in 1820, came into use for . . . — Map (db m125603) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Mountain Home — Oregon Trail 1864 — Site of Old Mountain Home Station
Map (db m125753) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Mountain Home — 4 — Site 4 ★ Hot Springs — Main Oregon Trail Back County Byway
Saturday August 16 "...we passed a hot springs near the foot of the same range, the water of which was nearly at a boiling temperature, so that one could not hold is finger in it, and a dog careless stepping across it put one foot in and ran . . . — Map (db m125752) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Mountain Home — 5 — Site 5 ★ Rattlesnake Creek — Main Oregon Trail Back County Byway
Friday September 10th "...Traveled along the foot of the mountain about 5 miles to another creek and stopped for the night. Plenty of dry bunchgrass. No timber, but willows and sage. Found eight graves here. Made fifteen miles." Parthenia . . . — Map (db m125754) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Mountain Home — 6 — Site 6 ★ Kelton Road — Main Oregon Trail Back County Byway
August the 13th "...the road to day way level but very rocky A long chain of mountains on our right and we travel close to them to day..." -- Absolom B. Harden, 1847 After the transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869, . . . — Map (db m125755) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Mountain Home — 7 — Site 7 ★ Canyon Creek — Main Oregon Trail Back County Byway
August 4th "This day we traveled nineteen miles over tolerably rough road ... After watering, we traveled eight and a half miles, which brought us to a barrel creek (Canyon Creek). Here we found a small creek running through a barrel-shaped . . . — Map (db m125756) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Mountain Home — Site 8 ★ Ditto Creek
Monday October 9th "This evening yellowish granite appeared in needle form fragments and masses. Country mountainous, good grass, water in the creek on which we are camped partially dried up. We struck a large and much travelled Banak trail . . . — Map (db m125785) HM
Idaho (Elmore County), Mountain Home — Site 9 ★ Bowns Creek
August 5th "This morning our road was very hilly for three miles. Here we found water and grass plenty, and brush for fire wood. Having had no water since we left Barrel creek we halted here for a rest. We halted here till 1 o'clock in the . . . — Map (db m125786) HM
Idaho (Franklin County), Preston — BB ID-4 — Bidwell/Bartleson Trail - Small Brook
First Overland Emigrant Party "Left the river on account of the hills which obstructed our way on it, ... Road uncommonly broken, did not reach the river, distance about 4 miles" -- John Bidwell, Saturday, August 14, 1841 "We traveled about . . . — Map (db m105832) HM
Idaho (Owyhee County), Homedale — Oregon Trail — 1842-1863

[Title is text] — Map (db m106938) HM

Idaho (Payette County), Fruitland — 263 — Snake River
The valley of the Snake, historic passage from the Midwest to the Northwest, has been a primary route for travel since the days of Indians and fur traders. The Oregon Trail forded the river at Old Fort Boise, the Hudson's Bay Company 12 miles . . . — Map (db m23195) HM
Idaho (Power County), American Falls — Coldwater Hill Rest Area Oregon Trail Kiosk — The Oregon Trail
(There are five historical panels in this kiosk:) Idaho's Emigrant Trail Westward-bound emigrants entered Idaho after crossing Thomas Fork Valley. They soon encountered the climb and descent of Big Hill, witnessed nature's . . . — Map (db m124029) HM
Idaho (Power County), American Falls — Massacre Rock - A Clashing of Cultures
These reported incidents of Shoshone Indian attacks on emigrant wagon trains in this gap and surrounding area between 1851 and August 10, 1862, led to the naming of these rock outcrop as "Massacre Rocks." The granite marker was dedicated by the . . . — Map (db m124160) HM
Idaho (Power County), American Falls — Massacre Rocks on Old Oregon Trail
In this defile on August 10, 1862 a band of Shoshone Indians ambushed an Immigrant Train bound for Oregon killing nine white men and wounding six. — Map (db m124159) HM
Idaho (Power County), American Falls — Oregon Trail — 1842 - 1883
Map (db m124076) HM
Idaho (Power County), American Falls — Oregon Trail — 1842 - 1883

[Title is text] — Map (db m124140) HM

Idaho (Power County), American Falls — 338 — Oregon Trail
Immediately west of here you will cross a small canyon that Oregon Trail emigrants regarded as their most dangerous exposure to Indians. After 1854, they had good reason to be alarmed. Wagon traffic has ruined important traditional Indian . . . — Map (db m124148) HM
Idaho (Power County), American Falls — Register Rock
After their meals were cooked and their livestock grazed, eany (sic)(Many?) pioneers took time to record their presence on this and other rocks in the area. The land around Register Rock was a common camping area along the Oregon and California . . . — Map (db m124166) HM
Idaho (Power County), American Falls — Snake River Rest Area Oregon Trail Kiosk — The Oregon Trail
(There are five historical panels in this kiosk:) Idaho's Emigrant Trails Westward-bound emigrants entered Idaho after crossing Thomas Fork Valley. They soon encountered the climb and descent of Big Hill, witnessed . . . — Map (db m124037) HM
Idaho (Twin Falls County), Hagerman — 206 — Payne's Ferry
A scow powered by oarsmen let Oregon Trail wagons cross Snake River here from 1852 to 1870. Then Overland Stage service from Boise to a rail terminal in Kelton, Utah was moved to this crossing, and M.E. Payne installed a large (14 by 60 foot) new . . . — Map (db m31653) HM
Idaho (Twin Falls County), Hagerman — 204 — Salmon Falls
In 1812, Joseph Miller found 100 lodges of Indians spearing thousands of salmon each afternoon at a cascade below here. Each summer they dried a year's supply. After 1842, they also traded salmon to Oregon Trail emigrants. John C. Fremont marveled . . . — Map (db m31597) HM
Idaho (Twin Falls County), Hansen — 342 — Rock Creek Station
An 1864 overland stage station at Rock Creek, 5 miles south and a mile west of here, offered a desert oasis for 40 years before irrigated farming transformed this area. James Bascom's 1865 store and Herman Stricker's 1900 mansion have been . . . — Map (db m31521) HM
Idaho (Washington County), Cambridge — 185 — Brownlee Ferry
Guiding Oregon Trail emigrants and a party of prospectors who had discovered gold in Boise Basin, Tim Goodale opened a new miners' trail through here in August 1862. A gold rush followed that fall, and John Brownlee operated a ferry here from . . . — Map (db m23227) HM
Kansas (Douglas County), Kanwaka — Coon Point — Oregon Trail — 1842
A Camping Ground Lecompton Territorial Capital of Kansas 1855-1861 Three miles north — Map (db m50757) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Gardner — 6 — Overland Trails
Here US-56 lies directly on the route of the Oregon-California and Santa Fe trails. Nearby, the trails branched. On a rough sign pointing northwest were the words, "Road to Oregon." Another marker directed travelers southwest along the road to Santa . . . — Map (db m21669) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — A Most Desirable Spot For Camping
The Lone Elm Campground The land here at Lone Elm met the three requirements for a stopover for travelers on the trail...wood, water, and grass. Wood for campfires and wagon repairs, water for the support of people and animals, and grass for . . . — Map (db m34342) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Elm Grove Campground
For over three decades starting in 1827, Elm Grove Campground, one mile east of near the bridge on Cedar Creek, was an important frontier camp site. Thousands of Santa Fe traders, Oregon and California emigrants, missionaries, mountain men, soldiers . . . — Map (db m20093) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Lone Elm Campground
Lone Elm is one of the most historic and important frontier trail camp sites in America and was used as a campground and rendezvous point for all three of our nation's great western roads to the frontier.....the Santa Fe, Oregon, and California . . . — Map (db m34334) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Lone Elm Park
"Travelers came to look upon it as an old friend - they felt an attachment for the tree that had so often sheltered and shaded them from storm and sun..." W.W.H. Davis (1853) Lone Elm Park was purchased by the City of Olathe in 2000 to . . . — Map (db m34339) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Roads To The West
The Santa Fe Trail The Santa Fe Trail began in 1821 when William Becknell led a small group of men on a trading expedition from frontier Missouri to colonial Santa Fe. Mexico had recently declared its independence from Spain and abolished . . . — Map (db m34340) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — The Travelers
The Travelers For more than four decades, tens of thousands of travelers camped here. The Lone Elm campground was one or two nights out from the frontier "jumping off" points on the Missouri River. The great lone elm tree that gave this . . . — Map (db m34355) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Trail Campground..To Farm..To Park
In 1857, Newton Ainsworth claimed this land and allowed the trail travelers to continue camping here. A decade later, the railroads began to make their way west and the great overland trails became a part of history. The need for camping at Lone . . . — Map (db m34357) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Trails West — by Eldon Tefft
The oxen and Conestoga wagon sculpture was originally commissioned in 1994 for use at the Kansas Visitors Center at 119th & Strang Line Road. When the Center closed in 2002 the sculpture was awarded to the City of Olathe. The sculpture has been . . . — Map (db m34337) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Opening the Floodgates

[Inset] "from 'Sappling Grove' where there is an excellent fountain spring & a very good place to camp.. The road runs a little round on the high ridge."

The Santa Fe Trail began in 1821 when William Becknell and a . . . — Map (db m100228) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Santa Fe and Oregon Trails
Both the Santa Fe and Oregon Trails crossed here, northeast to southwest, beginning 1821. The trails took separate courses farther west. A route through Kansas Territory was opened north of here in the 1830's after the founding of Westport, Mo. Long . . . — Map (db m20213) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Two Routes from Westport

The Santa Fe Trail forked into two routes as it headed south from Westport. Along the routes were campgrounds for trail travelers — to the northeast of the junction was Sapling Grove and the southwest was a campground called Flat Rock or . . . — Map (db m100264) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Two Ways West from Westport

Imagine seeing Santa Fe Trail wagon trains coursing through Overland Park! Around you swirls the sights and sounds of wagons creaking, oxen braying, and wagon masters shouting commands. You are standing between two historic branches of the . . . — Map (db m99307) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Voices from the Trail

The Santa Fe, Oregon, and California trails proved to be both challenging and exhilarating for the travelers in the caravans passing through this junction along one of the Westport routes. Letters and diaries are filled with adventures and . . . — Map (db m100260) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Shawnee — Gum Springs
Located today at 59th Terrace and Bluejacket in the city of Shawnee, Gum Springs was the site of the Shawnee Indian church and meeting house, as well as the location of several excellent springs, all near the intersection of the Fort Leavenworth . . . — Map (db m50693) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Shawnee — The Development of the Kansas City area Frontier Trails Network — Trail Map
The Santa Fe Trail went through two decades of change in the Kansas City area before evolving into it's final form by about 1840. In the early years of that decade it also became the route of the Oregon Trail and California Trail. 1821 - . . . — Map (db m50679) HM
Kansas (Leavenworth County), Fort Leavenworth — Santa Fe and Oregon Trails
This cut is part of the old Santa Fe Trail. Many years ago the Missouri River came near this site and thousands of early settlers were ferried here. Their wagons and teams climbed this hill and headed west toward Santa Fe and the Oregon . . . — Map (db m66712) HM
Kansas (Leavenworth County), Fort Leavenworth — The Oregon and Santa Fe Trails
The stone monuments to the west mark the trace of the original road leading up from the river. For many pioneers, traders, settlers and soldiers, this was the beginning of the Oregon and Santa Fe Trails leading to the Far West. The steamboat and . . . — Map (db m66713) HM
Kansas (Marshall County), Blue Rapids — A Quiet and Restful Place
To cross the high western mountains before the fall snow storms arrived, many emigrant wagon trains headed for the Oregon or California territories left Independence, Missouri, in mid April to early May. The downside to leaving too early often . . . — Map (db m79152) HM
Kansas (Marshall County), Blue Rapids — A Respite In The Wilderness — Alcove Spring
The water is of the most excellent kind. The spring is surrounded with Ash Cotton wood and Cedar trees. It is an excellent place to camp for a day or two to wash, recruit the cattle etc. I this day cut the name of the spring in the rock on . . . — Map (db m79134) HM
Kansas (Marshall County), Blue Rapids — Alcove Spring Park
Alcove Spring Park consists of more than 200 acres of native prairie and timber land maintained for the preservation of this historic camping ground on the Oregon-California trail and for the enjoyment of our visitors. The park is owned . . . — Map (db m79116) HM
Kansas (Marshall County), Blue Rapids — 26 — Alcove Springs & the Oregon Trail
Six miles northwest is Alcove Springs, named in 1846 by appreciative travelers on the Oregon trail who carved the name on the surrounding rocks and trees. One described the Springs as "a beautiful cascade of water... altogether one of the most . . . — Map (db m79113) HM
Kansas (Marshall County), Blue Rapids — The 1840s American Dream — Alcove Spring
Stranded by heavy flood waters on the bank of the Big Blue River, 100 members of the Donner and Reed Wagon Train waited for several days anticipating that the spring runoff would begin to subside. Sarah Keyes, James Reed's mother-in-law, . . . — Map (db m79137) HM
Kansas (Pottawatomie County), St. Marys — Site of the Oregon Trail — 1830 - 1876
Over 300,000 persons passed along this trail in the years of its use to build an empire beyond our western frontier. — Map (db m34795) HM
Kansas (Pottawatomie County), St. Marys — 18 — St. Marys
This city and college take their name from St. Mary's Catholic Mission founded here by the Jesuits in 1848 for the Pottawatomie Indians. These missionaries, who had lived with the tribe in eastern Kansas from 1838, accompanied the removal to this . . . — Map (db m122966) HM
Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — Burial Site of Oregon Trail Traveler

Here lies an early traveler who lost his life in quest of riches in the West. — Map (db m80960) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — One Step at a Time

The Oregon Trail was the main street of the west from the 1830's to the completion of the first transcontinental railroad in 1869. Farmers, townsmen and restless Americans from all walks of life moved along this route seeking a better life in a . . . — Map (db m80948) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — Route of the Oregon Trail

Historians have estimated that between 250,000 and 300,000 emigrants used the Oregon Trail between 1840 and 1869. At least 30,000 emigrants died along the Oregon Trail, leaving an average of 15 graves for every mile of the trail. Disease, . . . — Map (db m80946) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — Scott Spring

The reservoir before you taps into the famous Scott Spring. The original outlet emanates from the base of a steep rock hill to the east. The refreshing water of Scott Spring offered abundant drinking water to many travelers on the Oregon Trail . . . — Map (db m80945) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — 20 — The California - Oregon Trail

From the 1830's to the 1870's, the 2,000-mile road connecting Missouri river towns with California and Oregon was America's greatest transcontinental highway. Several routes led west from the river, converging into one trail by the time the . . . — Map (db m80927) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — The Long Journey

The long journey overland to Oregon took about six months. Time, distance, and hardships seasoned the emigrants. They had the ability and had earned the right to mold their own destiny in the new land. The Oregon Trail became a vital part of . . . — Map (db m80949) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — The Wagon & Team • Supplies Needed

Wagons for trail travel were of the simplest construction. They cost $85.00 each. They were light, strong and carried on sturdy wheels. It was recommended that wheels be made of bois-d-oro, osage of orangewood or white oak. Bolt ends should be . . . — Map (db m80947) HM

Kansas (Pottawatomie County), Westmoreland — Wagons Fording Rock Creek

There were many unpredictable hazards on the trail as the wagon trains moved westward. The trail itself presented the worst problems. Streams had no bridges and had to be forded. Their shifting bottoms with pockets of quicksand were dangerous. . . . — Map (db m80959) HM

Kansas (Shawnee County), Topeka — 15 — Capital of Kansas
Topeka was founded in 1854 at the site of Papan's Ferry where a branch of the Oregon Trail crossed the Kansas river as early as 1842. Anti-slavery leaders framed the Topeka Constitution, 1855, in the first attempt to organize a state government. The . . . — Map (db m20479) HM
Missouri (Buchanan County), Saint Joseph — The California - Oregon Trail — 1840s & 1850s
Each spring thousands of emigrants camped in these hills and meadows waiting for new grass to support their teams along the trail. Wagons lined St. Joseph streets to the east waiting for two to three days to be ferried from this point. The settlers . . . — Map (db m47467) HM
Missouri (Buchanan County), Saint Joseph — The Journey West
After the 1848 discovery of gold in California, more than 100,000 sturdy Americans passed through St. Joseph on their way west in quest of wealth, opportunity and better lives. The "Gold Rush" began and those who followed the "Star of Empire" . . . — Map (db m47479) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Independence — Here the Oregon Trail Began
This monument honors the pioneer spirit of those courageous men and women who by their heroic trek across the continent established homes and civilization in the Far Northwest — Map (db m34753) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — McCoy's Trading Post
Near this point John McCoy built a log trading post in 1833 which launched the settlement of Westport, with the town becoming the westernmost point of American civilization. From Westport, the Santa Fe, California, and Oregon Trails reached out as . . . — Map (db m21064) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — New Santa Fe / Trail Remnants
(black marker) New Santa Fe, also known as Little Santa Fe, was not much more than an Indian settlement when the first wagon trains passed through on the Santa Fe Trail in the early 1820's. A popular stopping place because of its grass, . . . — Map (db m20724) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — The Albert G. Boone Store
(Main Marker) Originally used as an outfitting store for wagon trains, this building was completed in 1850 by Indian traders George and William Ewing and was sold in 1854 to Albert Gallatin Boone for $7,000. Boone operated the store . . . — Map (db m20921) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — Where Wagons Rolled / Wieduwilt Swales
Thousands of wagon wheels, animal hooves, and human feet once passed this way – creating the deep depression in front of you. The swale, now worn by erosion, is grassed-over evidence of three trails once connecting frontier Missouri to . . . — Map (db m87293) HM
Nebraska (Adams County), Kenesaw — Susan C. Haile Gravesite
Susan C. Haile was born December 20, 1817, in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. She was the youngest child of Joseph and Prudence (Bledsoe) Seawell, natives of Sumner County, Tennessee. Upon the death of Joseph in 1819, Prudence Seawell returned to Sumner . . . — Map (db m123807) HM
Nebraska (Buffalo County), Kearney — Old Oregon Trail
. . . — Map (db m58815) HM
Nebraska (Deuel County), Big Springs — The Big Spring
Pioneers traveling west on the Oregon Trail discovered this spring that Plains Indians had frequented for centuries. It provided an oasis for man and beast alike in the “Great American Desert.’ In 1867, Union Pacific railroad workers named it . . . — Map (db m51461) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — 15 — Ash Hollow
Ash Hollow was famous on the Oregon Trail. A branch of the trail ran northwestward from the Lower California Crossing of the South Platte River a few miles west of Brule, and descended here into the North Platte Valley. The hollow, named for a . . . — Map (db m2503) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Windlass Hill entrance to Ash Hollow — Map (db m86674) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Trail 30 feet east — Map (db m86675) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — The Oregon Trail
      Travelers reached this point over the trail you see stretching out across the prairie to the southeast. They left the last real settlement at Westport Landing or at Independence, some 600 miles from here. Most of them took about 40 days to . . . — Map (db m87332) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — Wagon Ruts
      This ravine started as a set of wagon ruts cut through the grass and soil by heavy iron-shod wheels. It is but one example of the long interaction between man and the environment in this region.       This walk to the top of the hill has . . . — Map (db m87337) HM
Nebraska (Garden County), Lewellen — 130 — Windlass Hill Pioneer Homestead
The stones surrounding this marker are the remains of the homestead dwelling of Reverend Dennis B. Clary, a pioneer Methodist Minister, who received final patent for his homestead Mar 22, 1899. Mr. Clary was born September 1st 1822, in Maryland and . . . — Map (db m2501) HM
Nebraska (Keith County), Brule — 313 — California Hill — Nebraska Historical Marker
The large hill to the north, which became known as “California Hill,” was climbed by thousands of covered wagon emigrants heading west between 1841 and 1860. Many were bound for Oregon. California became the destination of the majority . . . — Map (db m51229) HM
Nebraska (Keith County), Brule — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Old California River Crossing South 14 Degrees East — Map (db m51230) HM
Nebraska (Keith County), Ogallala — 7 — California Hill
Many emigrants to Oregon or California had to ford the South Platte River to continue their trek up the North Platte River to South Pass. The most important ford, known as the Old California Crossing, was a few miles west of present-day Ogallala. . . . — Map (db m50790) HM
Nebraska (Keith County), Ogallala — Oregon Trail
Oregon Trail Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 — Map (db m122901) HM
Nebraska (Morrill County), Bayard — Chimney Rock Station
Seal of the National Pony Express Centennial Association Chimney Rock Station on the route of the Pony Express, was located near here between Chimney Rock and the North Platte River. This was an important Pony Express stop between . . . — Map (db m79423) HM
Nebraska (Morrill County), Bayard — The Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Chimney Rock S 56Ί 56’ W. 9041 Ft. — Map (db m86714) HM
Nebraska (Morrill County), Bridgeport — Oregon Trail
Oregon Trail Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 — Map (db m79390) HM
Nebraska (Phelps County), Bertrand — The Plum Creek Massacre
On the morning of August 8, 1864, a war party of Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians attacked a Denver-bound freight wagon train killing thirteen men and taking captive Nancy Jane Morton of Sidney, Iowa, and nine-year old Daniel Marble of Council Bluffs, . . . — Map (db m107476) WM
Nebraska (Platte County), Columbus — North Branch, Oregon Trail
Gratefully dedicated to early pioneers — Map (db m53149) HM
Nebraska (Scotts Bluff County), Gering — Oregon Trail Memorial
Honoring these and all the thousands who lie in nameless graves along the trail. Faith and courage such as theirs made America. May ours preserve it. — Map (db m78704) HM
Nebraska (Scotts Bluff County), Lyman — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Nebraska-Wyoming Monument N. 57Ί 40' W. 2086 ft — Map (db m98346) HM
Nebraska (Scotts Bluff County), Mitchell — Fort Mitchell, 1864-1867 — 1864 - 1867
In 1909 Nebraska State Surveyor Robert Harvey surveyed the Fort Mitchell site documenting the location of the fort for the Nebraska State Historical Society. Mr. Harvey’s site sketch is partially shown to the right. The granite Oregon Trail . . . — Map (db m79436) HM
Nebraska (Scotts Bluff County), Mitchell — 17 — Scott's Bluff Pony Express Station — In Search of the Pony Express Stations
Text is found on both sides of this marker Dedicated October 5, 2013 Scott’s Bluff Original Station Apr. 3, 1860 - Nov. 20. 1861 by James Stretesky Joseph L. Schroeder Panhandle Monument Gordy & Linda . . . — Map (db m79437) HM
Nebraska (Scotts Bluff County), Scottsbluff — Oregon Trail
Marked by the State of Nebraska 1912 Trail passed 37 feet north of this Point. Mitchell Pass — Map (db m86670) HM
Nebraska (York County), York — Nebraska City Cut-Off of the Oregon Trail

This boulder marks the Nebraska City Cut-Off of the Oregon Trail — Map (db m79844) HM

Nebraska (York County), York — 174 — Nebraska City-Fort Kearny Cut-Off

Massive freighting of supplies by ox and mule trains was a direct result of the establishment of Fort Kearny and other western military posts. The Mormon War and the discovery of gold in the territories of Colorado and Montana increased this . . . — Map (db m79830) HM

Oregon (Baker County), Baker City — Baker — Historic Oregon Trail
In October 1861, a group of prospectors in search of the mythical Blue Bucket Mine, made camp on a creek six miles southwest of here. That evening, Henry Griffin discovered gold in the gulch which bears his name. That started a stampede which . . . — Map (db m108152) HM
Oregon (Baker County), Baker City — Old Oregon Trail — 1843
Dedicated to the memory of the intrepid pioneers who blazed the way over the Old Oregon Trail with the first covered wagons in 1843 and won an empire for the United States. Erected by the American Legion July 4, 1925 — Map (db m108048) HM
Oregon (Baker County), Baker City — Oregon Trail Memorial — 1843 - 1943
Map (db m108127) HM
Oregon (Baker County), Baker City — Ruts of the Oregon Trail
Of the 2170 miles of the Oregon Trail, approximately 300 miles of ruts remain. Swales created by thousands of wagon wheels and the trampling of draft animals are deep in some areas, shallow in other places. Much of the trail has disappeared due to . . . — Map (db m108130) HM
Oregon (Baker County), Baker City — The Lone Tree of the Oregon Trail
Early Oregon Trail emigrants crested the south flank of Flagstaff Hill and, with the Blue Mountains looming to the west, saw a solitary tree in the valley below. Called l’arbre seul (the lone tree) by French-Canadian fur trappers, this large . . . — Map (db m108122) HM
Oregon (Baker County), Baker City — The Lure of Gold — Oregon Trail — Oregon History
Beginning in 1843, thousands of Oregon Trail emigrants trekked through this region toward new lives in the West. This epic journey indelibly etched the landscape with wagon ruts, such as those near by. When Henry Griffin, a prospector from . . . — Map (db m108128) HM
Oregon (Baker County), Baker City — The Oregon Trail — Route of Wagon Trains — from 1843 to the 1860's
Wagons and cattle of the Great Migration, led by Marcus Whitman in 1843, descended Sept. 25 into Lone Pine valley. After nearly a month of travel over the hot dry Snake river plains from Fort Hall near Pocatello, Idaho, the cool climate and lush . . . — Map (db m108157) HM
Oregon (Baker County), Durkee — Durkee — Historic Oregon Trail
This spot was famous in early days as Express Ranch an important relay station on the Umatilla-Boise Basin stage and freight route. It was also a favorite camping place for emigrants and teamsters. — Map (db m108121) HM
Oregon (Baker County), Huntington — Farewell Bend Oregon Trail Kiosk
(The Farewell Bend Oregon Trail kiosk houses seven panels which deal with the trials and tribulations on this arid portion of the Oregon Trail.) "Pathway to the "Garden of the World" Excitement filled the air May 22, . . . — Map (db m107276) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Government Camp — "Disparite Bad Beyond Discription" — Hardships of the Trail
This mountain pass in named for Samuel K. Barlow who opened the first wagon route over the Cascades in 1846 to complete the Oregon Trail. The route was far from easy. Emigrant Isom Cranfill (cabinet maker, farmer, and itinerant preacher) made the . . . — Map (db m112383) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Government Camp — "Sumate Prairie" — from an emigrant's journal original spelling
Imagine feeding your hungry children and skinny ox teams whottleberries here. Helping you spouse repair your tired wagon for tomorrow's dreaded drop down Laurel Hill. Rain clouds gather around Mount Hood's peak. More storms coming. And they say the . . . — Map (db m112373) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Government Camp — A Final Rest — For One Pioneer Woman, the Oregon Trail Ended Here
In 1924 engineers constructing the first Mt. Hood Highway discovered a gravesite here. The grave was marked with an old wooden wagon tongue buried beneath decades of overgrown brush. When they dug up the site, they found the remains of an emigrant . . . — Map (db m113603) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Government Camp — Barlow Road
First Road built over Cascade Range in 1845-1846 by Samuel K. Barlow (1792-1867) an Oregon Pioneer from Kentucky Wamic -- Miles 32 Dalles California Highway -- Miles 38 Maupin -- Miles 48 — Map (db m112396) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Government Camp — Government Camp
Village of Government Camp formerly a camp on the old Barlow Road, the village was named in 1849 when US Cavalry troops were forced to abandon wagons and supplies here. — Map (db m112337) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Government Camp — Government Camp
Village of Government Camp Formerly a camp on the old Barlow Road was named in the fall of 1849 when the first United States Mounted Rifles abandoned a large number of wagons here, while a detachment was traveling from The Dalles to . . . — Map (db m112338) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Government Camp — Samuel Kimbrough Barlow — Susannah Lee Barlow
There are two plaques mounted on a boulder. Samuel Kimbrough Barlow Oregon Pioneer from Kentucky Built the first wagon road across Cascade Mountains passing this spot 1845 - 1846 The building of railways . . . — Map (db m112339) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Oregon City — End of the Oregon Trail
Here the Pioneers Ended Their Journey West. Abernethy Green is the Official End of the Oregon Trail, As Designated by the U.S. Congress In 1978. Placed in Honor of the Pioneer Achievements of Dan Fowler Oregon . . . — Map (db m114198) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Oregon City — End of the Oregon Trail — 1845-46
Oregon City, Western Terminus of the Oregon Trail (about 2200 miles from Independence, MO) Here at Abernethy Green in the fall of 1845, members of the Barlow-Palmer-Rector Wagon Train entered Oregon City as best they could. Pioneering a . . . — Map (db m114199) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Oregon City — Gardens — Living History of the Oregon Trail
"We pitched our tent... remaining at this camp for about one week, feasting on watermelons and good, fresh vegetables right from the garden, which are brought in by the Clackamas County farmers in great abundance." E.W. Conyers on arrival in . . . — Map (db m114201) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Oregon City — George Abernethy's Historical Significance — You are currently standing on Abernethy Green!
George Abernethy who arrived at Willamette Falls in 1840 by ship, took a land claim that stretched from the Willamette River to Holcomb Hill. The neck of land that followed Abernethy Creek acrosss Green Point became known as Abernethy Green. Oregon . . . — Map (db m114032) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Oregon City — Medorem Crawford — Wagon Master
"A few of us (went) to the Falls of Willamut where we found many people & considerable of business." Medorem Crawford, Journal, October 3, 1842 An emigrant of 1842, Medorem Crawford worked for nearly a decade hauling freight around . . . — Map (db m114760) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Oregon City — Old Oregon Trail — 1846
Erected by Willamette Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution Portland, Oregon 1917 — Map (db m114200) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Oregon City — To The Banks Of The Willamette
"Past on twelve miles or more, took the (w)rong road and arrived at the Willammette bottoms about dark a little below the City." -- Samuel Dexter Francis, October 14, 1852 In September and October, and early November the meadows at the . . . — Map (db m114136) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Oregon City — Wagons — Homes Away From Home
Letters in newspapers, emigrant guide-books, and word of mouth gave counsel on overland travel. Emigrants commonly used farm wagons - simple, well-made, and utilitarian. Many were home-made or commission-built by local wagon makers. Some had custom . . . — Map (db m114761) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Rhododendron — Laurel Hill — Historic Oregon Trail.
The pioneer road here detoured the Columbia River rapids and Mount Hood to the Willamette Valley. The road at first followed an old Indian trail. The later name was Barlow Road. Travel was difficult. Wagons were snubbed to trees by ropes on held . . . — Map (db m112372) HM
Oregon (Clackamas County), Rhododendron — The Oregon Trail — 1845

[Title is text] — Map (db m112340) HM

Oregon (Clackamas County), Welches — Emigrant's Final Steps — The Barlow Road — Oregon Trail Mile 1891
In the shadow of the tall trees, a stream of travelers crossed ash flows, talus slopes and boggy wetlands along this last stretch of the trail. Some emigrants were forced to abandon their wagons with the death of livestock and walk, carrying their . . . — Map (db m112341) HM
Oregon (Gilliam County), Arlington — Arlington Oregon Trail Kiosk
(Seven panels dealing with the Columbia Plateau and Columbia River portions of the Oregon Trail are found at this kiosk) Pathway to the "Garden of the World" Excitement filled the air May 22, 1843 as nearly one thousand Americans left . . . — Map (db m111946) HM
Oregon (Malheur County), Adrian — The South Alternate Route of the Oregon Trail
During the late 19th century thousands of Americans left farms, families and friends to trek the Oregon Trail toward new lives in the West. The trail was nearly 2,000 miles across prairies, mountains and parched deserts. Contrary to popular belief, . . . — Map (db m106941) HM
Oregon (Malheur County), Nyssa — Old Oregon Trail — 1843 - 57
Map (db m106945) HM
Oregon (Malheur County), Vale — Cutoff Fever — Oregon History
Eager to save time on the Oregon Trail, emigrants often attempted shortcuts. Between 1845 and 1854, three wagon trains left this campsite seeking a cutoff to the Willamette Valley. The Meek Cutoff of 1845 Frontiersman Stephen . . . — Map (db m107076) HM
Oregon (Morrow County), Ione — Fourmile Canyon — Blazing heat, bitter cold and blustery winds
Fourmile Canyon witnessed the westward passage of wagons across the Columbia Plateau during the late summer and early fall. By this time on their journey, the emigrants had alternately been exposed to blazing heat, bitter cold and blustery winds. In . . . — Map (db m111943) HM
Oregon (Morrow County), Ione — Rocks, Sand & Wind
Testing stamina and patience, the wagons were hurried to maintain constant motion across seemingly barren terrain. Facing trampled and scarce resources, the emigrants were often forced to wander miles off the established trail in search of water, . . . — Map (db m111944) HM
Oregon (Morrow County), Ione — Willow Creek Campground
The Oregon Trail crossing of Willow Creek was an important site on the trail. There was water and forage for the pioneers and their livestock. This was often a location for a layover to rest and equipment repair before pushing on to The Dalles and a . . . — Map (db m111942) HM
Oregon (Multnomah County), Troutdale — Sandy River Bridge
On October 30, 1792 off the point in the Columbia River where the Sandy empties its waters, the boat crew from the H.M.S. Chatham (Vancouver's Voyages) were the first white men to sight the snowclad peak which Lt. Wm. R. Broughton named Mt. Hood in . . . — Map (db m38388) HM
Oregon (Sherman County), Biggs Junction — First Sight of the Columbia River
Near This Point, from 1843 - to - 1863 West Bound Emigrants Caught Their First Sight of the Columbia River — Map (db m111982) HM
Oregon (Sherman County), Wasco — Deschutes River Crossing
The Oregon Trail crossed the hazardous Deschutes River at this point by floating the prairie schooners and swimming the livestock. An island at the river mouth was often utilized when the water was high and the ford dangerous. Pioneer women and . . . — Map (db m34575) HM
Oregon (Sherman County), Wasco — Deschutes River Crossing Oregon Trail Kiosk
(Seven panels dealing with the Deschutes River Crossing portion of the Oregon Trail are found at this kiosk) Truly Heart-Breaking! Oregon Trail emigrants reached the Columbia River after an arduous trek across the dry and . . . — Map (db m111990) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Adams — Deadman Pass Oregon Trail Kiosk
(Six panels dealing with the Deadman Pass portion of the Oregon Trail are found at this kiosk) Wagon Ruts  More than 50,000 emigrants traveled west on the Oregon Trail between 1840 and 1850. The constant stream of wagons . . . — Map (db m111563) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Echo — Covered Wagon Museum
The Wagon and Team Wagons for trail travel were of the simplest construction, they cost $85.00 each. They were light, strong, and carried on sturdy wheels. It was recommended that wheels be made of bois-d'arc, osage orangewood or white . . . — Map (db m111926) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Echo — David R. Koontz
David R. Koontz was a born in Gallia County, Ohio on September 20, 1829, and was buried here about September 10, 1852. He was the seventh child and youngest son of Martin V. Koontz, bridge builder and carpenter, and Lydia Rickabaugh. The Koontz . . . — Map (db m111938) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Echo — The Lower Crossing
This morning after going one mile, we left the river, five mile over the ridge we crossed the river and encamped for the day in order to recruit our cattle as they were much fatigued by crossing the Blue Mountains. -- William J. Watson, August . . . — Map (db m111924) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Meacham — Emigrant Springs Oregon Trail Kiosk
(Six panels dealing with the Emigrant Springs portion of the Oregon Trail are found beneath this kiosk) Lost Livestock Water is scarce in the steep, forested slopes of the Blue Mountains and is often found only at . . . — Map (db m111537) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Meacham — Emigrant Springs State Park
In the first week of January, 1812, a party of trappers and traders, members of the Astor Overland Expedition, crossed the Blue Mountains in this area. Traveling afoot in bitter cold, often waist deep in snow, they were the first white men in this . . . — Map (db m111534) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Meacham — Oregon Trail Memorial
In Memoriam Erected 1925 by the Women's Community Club of Meacham, Oregon In honor of those who died Blazing the Old Oregon Trail — Map (db m111528) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Meacham — The Intrepid Pioneers
Dedicated to the memory of The Intrepid Pioneers Who came with the First Wagon Train In 1843 over the Old Oregon Trail And Saved the "Oregon County" To the United States. Erected by Old Oregon Trail Ass'n. July 4, . . . — Map (db m111533) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Pendleton — Aura Goodwin Raley — "Mother of Pendleton" — August 23, 1829 - July 21, 1913
Aura Morse Goodwin Raley was born in Kennebec County, Maine. At age 15 she move to Wisconsin, and in 1846 she married Moses Goodwin. In 1853 the couple joined a wagon train to Oregon, where they settled north of Vancouver, Washington. In 1864 the . . . — Map (db m111644) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Pendleton — Pendleton — Historic Trail
This location marks a travel corridor for Plateau Tribes moving seasonally from the Columbia River to the Blue Mountains. In 1811, members of the Astor Party under the leadership of Wilson Price Hunt camped here on their way west. They traded with . . . — Map (db m111565) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Pendleton — Pendleton Oregon Trail Kiosk
(Six panels dealing with the Pendleton area portion of the Oregon Trail are found at this kiosk) The Long Walk to Oregon Contrary to popular belief Oregon Trail emigrants rarely took the reins while seated in their . . . — Map (db m111578) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Pendleton — Umatilla County — Historic Oregon Trail.
Weary emigrants traveling westward on the Oregon Trail favored a campsite on the near bank of the Umatilla River at this point. On leaving they climbed the same hill the highway now traverses. Then recrossed the Umatilla River at Echo 20 hot dusty . . . — Map (db m111912) HM
Oregon (Umatilla County), Stanfield — Stansfield Rest Area Oregon Trial Kiosk
(Six panels dealing with the Umatilla River Crossing portion of the Oregon Trail are found at this kiosk) The Road Forks Early Oregon Trail emigrants crossed the Blue Mountains and traveled north to re-provision at the . . . — Map (db m111940) HM
Oregon (Union County), La Grande — A Native American Trail
Native peoples crossed the Blue Mountains long before the first explores and fur trappers. In 1834, John Kirk Townsend found the Cayuse and Nez Perce, very friendly towards us, each of the chiefs taking us by the hand with great . . . — Map (db m111490) HM
Oregon (Union County), Le Grande — A Beautiful Rough Road
"Commenced the ascent of the Blue Mountains It is a lovely morning, and all hands seem to be delighted with the prospect, of being so near timber again, after weary months of travel, on the dry dusty sage plants, with nothing to receive the eye; . . . — Map (db m111491) HM
Oregon (Union County), Le Grande — Hilgard Junction Oregon Trail Kiosk
(Six panels dealing with the Blue Mountian portion of the Oregon Trail are found beneath this kiosk) The Blue Mountains Oregon Trail emigrants crossed the Rocky Mountains through South Pass in Wyoming. The ascent and . . . — Map (db m111466) HM
Oregon (Union County), Le Grande — On This Ridge...
"... we traveled on for the Blue Mountains cutting our way through the fallen timber... We found it very laborious ... with our dull axes that we had not ground since we left Missouri having no grinding stone to grind them & our hands being very . . . — Map (db m111494) HM
Oregon (Union County), Le Grande — Parade of Survivors
On August 15, 1853 Henry Allyn wrote the following about his second day in the Blue Mountains: "Elizabeth and father still quite unwell ... We noon on the mountain and take our mules down into a doleful cavern and found a little grass and water, . . . — Map (db m111492) HM
Oregon (Union County), Le Grande — Wagon Wheels to Automobiles
During the mid-1800s, thousands of American emigrants labored along this ridge. Since then, stage coach, train and automobile roads have paralleled the Oregon Trail over these mountains. Only traces of the original road remain, yet the ideals of . . . — Map (db m111496) HM
Oregon (Wasco County), Mosier — Memaloose Rest Area Oregon Trail Kiosk
(Twelve panels dealing with Oregon Trail related topics are found at this kiosk) Pathway to the "Garden of the World" Excitement filled the air May 22, 1843 as nearly one thousand Americans left Missouri toward new . . . — Map (db m112193) HM

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