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National Cemeteries Historical Markers

The human carnage of the American Civil War led Congress in 1862 to authorize President Lincoln to purchase cemetery grounds to be used as national cemeteries. By 1870, the remains of nearly 300,000 Union dead had been buried in 73 national cemeteries. As of late 2018, there are 150 National Cemeteries, with the Department of Veterans Affairs' National Cemetery Administration maintaining most, while the US Army and the US Department of the Interior maintain several, with more than four million veterans of all US wars interred.
 
Company K, 150th Ohio National Guard Infantry Marker image, Touch for more information
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2014
Company K, 150th Ohio National Guard Infantry Marker
District of Columbia (Washington), Manor Park — Company K, 150th Ohio National Guard Infantry
Memorial to Co. K. 150th O.N.G.I. Which took part In the defense of Fort Stevens, D. C. July 12, 1864 — Map (db m76118) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Manor Park — Roll Call — Rock Creek Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
As the gallant soldiers that are interred at the cemetery marched onto the battlefield on July 11-12, 1864 during the Battle of Fort Stevens, their regimental flags accompanied then into the fight. Battleground National Cemetery honors these . . . — Map (db m64225) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Manor Park — The 122nd New York Volunteer Infantry
To the gallant sons of Onondaga County, N.Y. who fought on this field July 12, 1864 in defence of Washington and in the presence of Abraham Lincoln 122 N.Y.V — Map (db m76093) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Manor Park — The 25th New York Cavalry
. . . — Map (db m76117) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Takoma — 98th Pennsylvania Infantry
In Memory of Our Comrades Killed and Wounded in Battle on This Field July 11th & 12th 1864 98th Reg't. P.V. 1st Brig., 2nd Div., 6th Corps — Map (db m76116) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Takoma — Battleground National Cemetery — Rock Creek Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
During the late evening of July 12, 1864, 40 Union soldiers that perished while defending Washington DC from a two day Confederate attack (known as the Battle of Fort Stevens) were laid to rest here in what was once an apple orchard. President . . . — Map (db m63644) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Takoma — 13 — Battleground National Cemetery — Battleground to Community — Brightwood Heritage Trail —
After the rebels were turned back as the Battle of Fort Stevens ended in 1864, scores of Union Soldiers lay cold and silent. Forty-one of them are buried here in this tiny plot dedicated to their sacrifice. President Abraham Lincoln, who . . . — Map (db m72825) HM
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union . . . — Map (db m127668) HM
Florida (St. Johns County), St. Augustine — St. Augustine National Cemetery
Civil War St. Augustine Florida seceded from the Union in January 1861. Confederate troops then captured Fort Marion, which was built in St. Augustine in the late 1600s as Castillo de San Marcos. By early 1862, the fall of Nashville, . . . — Map (db m127667) HM
Illinois (Madison County), Alton — Alton National Cemetery
Civil War Alton In spring, 1861, pro-Confederate militia in St. Louis, Missouri, threatened to capture the U.S. arsenal there. Union forces in Illinois commandeered the steamboat City of Alton, sailed south, and and at midnight on . . . — Map (db m133299) HM
Illinois (Madison County), Alton — The Cost of Freedom
More people died during the Civil War than during any other war in U.S. history. An estimated 200 Union soldiers are buried at the Alton Cemetery. More than three million fought in the Civil War. Two percent of the population—more . . . — Map (db m133300) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — A National Cemetery System

Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union . . . — Map (db m108813) HM

Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Fort Scott National Cemetery
This National Cemetery has been listed in The National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m61520) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Fort Scott National Cemetery

Civil War Fort Scott Fort Scott, founded 1842, was named for former commander-in-chief of the U.S. Army, Gen. Winfield Scott. The army abandoned the fort in 1853, but the Civil War prompted federal troops to return in 1862. Fort Scott . . . — Map (db m108814) HM

Kentucky (Fayette County), Lexington — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union troops. . . . — Map (db m123526) HM
Kentucky (Fayette County), Lexington — Address by President Lincoln — At the Dedication of The Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, . . . — Map (db m138998) HM WM
Louisiana (East Baton Rouge Parish), Baton Rouge — Baton Rouge National Cemetery
Civil War Baton Rouge Control of the Mississippi River and New Orleans was vital to the Union war effort. In April 1862, Union gunboats steamed up the river. The vessels evaded the guns of Confederate-held forts located below New Orleans, . . . — Map (db m131637) HM
Louisiana (East Baton Rouge Parish), Baton Rouge — National Cemetery
Federal soldiers killed in the Battle of Baton Rouge, August 5, 1862, were buried on this site which became a National Cemetery in 1867. Among soldiers buried here is General Philemon Thomas, remembered for his attack on the Spanish fort at Baton . . . — Map (db m87226) HM
Louisiana (East Baton Rouge Parish), Zachary — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. Government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union . . . — Map (db m93325) HM
Louisiana (East Baton Rouge Parish), Zachary — Port Hudson National Cemetery
Fall of Port Hudson In May 1863, Union Gen. Nathaniel Banks landed 30,000 soldiers at Bayou Sara north of Port Hudson. A force of 7,500 men commanded by Confederate Gen. Franklin Gardner held the Mississippi River stronghold. General Banks' . . . — Map (db m129210) HM
Louisiana (Rapides Parish), Pineville — Address by President Lincoln — November 19, 1863
Address by President Lincoln At the dedication of The Gettysburg National Cemetery November 19, 1863

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and . . . — Map (db m137261) HM WM

Louisiana (Rapides Parish), Pineville — Alexandria National Cemetery
The Alexandria National Cemetery, Pineville, was authorized by an Act of Congress on February 22, 1867, and the United States, through the Secretary of War, took possession April 1871 of this property from the Succession of Franco Poussan. The . . . — Map (db m110587) HM
Louisiana (Rapides Parish), Pineville — Alexandria National Cemetery
Civil War AlexandriaAlexandria, Louisiana, served briefly of the Confederate Department of the Trans-Mississippi, as the headquarters a vast area encompassing states and territories west of the Mississippi River.

In spring 1863, the . . . — Map (db m136134) HM

Louisiana (St. Bernard Parish), Chalmette — Chalmette National Cemetery
Chalmette National Cemetery was established in 1864 as a burial place for Union soldiers who died in the gulf area during the Civil War. It also served as the site for reburials of soldiers from battlefield cemeteries in the region. This plot of . . . — Map (db m97175) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union . . . — Map (db m114568) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Address by President Lincoln — At the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that . . . — Map (db m114674) WM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Annapolis National Cemetery
Civil War Annapolis In April 1861, Gen. Benjamin Butler and his Massachusetts troops entered the Maryland capital to ensure the state remained in the Union. The U.S. Army then reformed the Department of Annapolis, headed by Butler, to . . . — Map (db m114566) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — From The Bivouac of the Dead — By Theodore O'Hara
The muffled drum's sad roll has beat The soldier's last tattoo; No more on life's parade shall meet That brave and fallen few. On Fame's eternal camping-ground Their silent tents are spread, And Glory guards, with solemn round, . . . — Map (db m125122) WM
Maryland, Baltimore — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union troops. . . . — Map (db m135083) HM WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Address by President Lincoln — At the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, . . . — Map (db m135087) HM WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Loudon Park National Cemetery
National Cemetery (center panel) In December 1861, the U.S. Sanitary Commission designated a small area of Loudon Park Cemetery for the burial of Union soldiers who died in Baltimore hospitals. The half-acre lot in the northeast corner . . . — Map (db m135081) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Maryland Naval Monument
(east side) Maryland’s tribute to her loyal sons who served in the United States Navy during the War for the Preservation of the Union. (north side) Port Royal • November 7th, 1861 Monitor & Merrimack • March 9th, 1862 New Orleans . . . — Map (db m135097) WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Maryland Sons Monument
(west side) To the Sons of Maryland who perished in preserving to us and posterity the “Government of the People, by the People for the People,” secured by our fathers, through the Union. This memorial is erected by her . . . — Map (db m135094) WM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — Address by President Lincoln — At the Dedication of The Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, . . . — Map (db m134999) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — Baltimore National Cemetery — National Register of Historic Places
This National Cemetery has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Department of the Interior 2016 — Map (db m134998) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — World War II Marine Divisions Memorial
Dedicated to the U.S. Marine Divisions (FMF) World War II To all those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the service of their country by the Maryland Chapter First Marine Division Association 1996 Flag Pole Erected by William Fosnaught, Jr. . . . — Map (db m135100) WM
Massachusetts (Barnstable County), Bourne — Address by President Lincoln — At the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, . . . — Map (db m136466) HM
Missouri (St. Louis County), Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery — 82nd Airborne Infantry Division US Army

To our honored dead and to all soldiers who have served their country in the 82nd Airborne Infantry Division.

Activated 25 August 1917 as the 82nd "All American" Infantry Division. Participated in the Lorraine, St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne . . . — Map (db m124968) HM WM

Missouri (St. Louis County), Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery — To The Confederate Dead 1861 - 1865
Who knows but it may be given to us, after this life, to meet again in the old quarters, to play chess and draughts, to get up soon to answer the morning roll call, to fall in at the tap of the drum for drill and dress parade and again to hastily . . . — Map (db m124979) WM
Missouri (St. Louis County), St. Louis — Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery — Missouri's Civil War 1861 - 1865
The Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery was established by joint resolution of Congress in 1866, among the first burial grounds officially designated in the wake of the Civil War. Under the care of the Veterans Administration, the facility is open . . . — Map (db m124986) HM
Pennsylvania (Bucks County), Newtown — Address by President Lincoln — At the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, . . . — Map (db m136467) HM
Pennsylvania (Cumberland County), Carlisle — 500 U.S. Soldiers of the Civil War are Here Interred
500 U.S. Soldiers of the Civil War are here Interred John Barney • John P. Beirne • John C. Biglow • William H. Brown John Conway • Albert D. Dailey • Charles David • John Driskell George Earlenbough • Marmaduke Foster • Soloman Francis John . . . — Map (db m135200) WM
Pennsylvania (Cumberland County), Carlisle — Ashland Soldiers' Lot
Carlisle At War (center panel) After Confederate forces fired on Fort Sumter, South Carolina, in April 1861, the men of Carlisle responded to the national calls to put down the southern rebellion. Four companies of Pennsylvania infantry . . . — Map (db m135169) HM WM
Pennsylvania (Lebanon County), Annville — Address by President Lincoln — At the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, . . . — Map (db m135099) HM WM
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia County), Philadelphia — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union troops. . . . — Map (db m136474) HM
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia County), Philadelphia — Address by President Lincoln — At the Dedication of The Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, . . . — Map (db m136476) HM WM
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia County), Philadelphia — Confederate Burials in the National Cemetery
The Confederate Section All of the Confederate prisoners of war buried here died in a Civil War military hospital in or near Philadelphia. All were originally interred near the hospital where they died. In the late 1880s, the dead were moved . . . — Map (db m136479) HM
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia County), Philadelphia — Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument
Erected by the United States to mark the burial place of 184 Confederate Soldiers and Sailors, As shown by the records, who, while prisoners of war, died either at Chester, Pa., and were there buried, or at Philadelphia and were buried in . . . — Map (db m136480) HM WM
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia County), Philadelphia — Mexican-American War Monument
(north side)To the soldiers of the Mexican War (east side)Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Huamantla, Puebla, Atlixco, Valley of Mexico. — Map (db m136481) WM
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia County), Philadelphia — Philadelphia National Cemetery
Civil War Philadelphia At the time of the Civil War, Philadelphia was the second-largest American city. Its factories supported the Union war effort by producing everything from blankets to gunboats. In less than three months, its navy yards . . . — Map (db m136477) HM
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia County), Philadelphia — U.S.C.T. Burials in the National Cemetery
U.S. Colored Troops Beginning in March 1863, the federal government began actively recruiting black men for the Union Army. A few months later, the War Department created the Bureau of United States Colored Troops (USCT). USCT regiments fought . . . — Map (db m136478) HM
Pennsylvania (York County), York — Prospect Hill Soldiers' Lot
York at War (center panel) On April 23, 1861, less than two weeks after Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, Gov. Andrew G. Curtin established Camp Scott at York, Pennsylvania. By early May, six regiments were . . . — Map (db m135168) HM WM
Rhode Island (Washington County), Exeter — Address by President Abraham Lincoln — November 19, 1863
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, . . . — Map (db m138220) HM WM
South Carolina (Beaufort County), Beaufort — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union troops. . . . — Map (db m134423) HM
South Carolina (Beaufort County), Beaufort — Beaufort National Cemetery
National Cemetery Beaufort National Cemetery was established in 1863. The U.S. Army Quartermaster General's Office laid out the 22 acres in sections that radiate outward from a central plaza to form a half circle. Of the 9,226 interments here . . . — Map (db m134421) HM
Vermont (Windham County), Brattleboro — Prospect Hill Soldier's Lot
Brattleboro at War (center panel) In May 1861, a month after the Confederate assault on Fort Sumter in South Carolina, the State of Vermont established a camp in the town of Brattleboro. The barracks and other buildings were used to . . . — Map (db m136427) HM
Virginia, Staunton — Staunton National Cemetery
National Cemetery Staunton National Cemetery was established in 1867. The remains of 753 Union soldiers, of which 521 are unknown, lie here. The remains came from Staunton and Waynesboro city cemeteries, and the battlefields at Cross Keys, . . . — Map (db m134427) HM
Virginia, Winchester — Address by President Lincoln — At the Dedication of The Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, . . . — Map (db m140371) HM WM

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