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The Washington-Rochambeau Route Historical Markers

In 1781 the two Generals met in White Plains, New York, crossed the Hudson River and marched 450 miles south to Yorktown in Virginia where their and Lafayette’s armies defeated the British, ending the war.
 
Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Marker image, Touch for more information
By Michael Herrick, March 22, 2014
Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau’s . . . — Map (db m72560) HM
2Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — The Rochambeau Route 1781 – 82
The Rochambeau Route 1781 – 82 In the Vicinity French Troops Under Duc De Lauzon Enroute From Newport To Yorktown Encamped During June 29 Through July 1st 1781 Erected by The Sons of the American Revolution Gen. . . . — Map (db m26098) HM
3Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — In Commemoration
1732 ---- 1932 In Commemoration Of The Two Hundredth Birthday Of George Washington ---- Rochambeau Established a Camp Here June 28 To July 1, 1781 ---- Soldiers Commanded By Lafayette Camped At This Spot Placed by Mary . . . — Map (db m26914) HM
4Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — Rochambeau
. . . — Map (db m42367) HM
5Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary RouteHousatonic Crossing
French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau’s . . . — Map (db m26915) HM
6Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Ridgebury Congregational Church
Gathered       Built 1760            1851 This property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior < Second Plaque: > Connecticut Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary . . . — Map (db m23423) HM
7Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary RouteRidgefield
French General Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, Comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau’s . . . — Map (db m23416) HM
8Connecticut (Hartford County), Farmington — Lest We Forget
Lest We Forget In honor and grateful remembrance of our French Allies in the Revolution, whose army, under the command of General Count de Rochambeau, marched past this spot enroute from Newport and Providence, R.I., to join General Washington on . . . — Map (db m33769) HM
9Connecticut (Hartford County), Farmington — Rochambeau Route 1781-82
. . . — Map (db m33012) HM
10Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — George Washington
George Washington was entertained by Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth in his home on this site on June 30, 1775 when on his way to Cambridge to assume command of the Army. On September 21, 22, 23, 1780 with Lafayette, General Knox and Governor . . . — Map (db m151930) HM
11Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — The First Meeting of Washington and Rochambeau
This tablet commemorates the historic first meeting of General George Washington and General Comte de Rochambeau, commander-in-chief of the French army in America, which took place September 20, 1780. On that occasion and in a subsequent meeting . . . — Map (db m52914) HM
12Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — The Wadsworth BarnThis tablet marks the location of the Wadsworth Barn built in 1733
Jeremiah Wadsworth was Commissary-General in the Continental Army. His house which stood at the present site of the Wadsworth Atheneum was the meeting place for many leaders of the American Revolution, among them Washington, Lafayette, and . . . — Map (db m151929) HM
13Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Hartford French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans . . . — Map (db m43739) HM
14Connecticut (Hartford County), Marion — Rochambeau
Rochambeau Lieut. General Commanding The Auxiliary French Armies Under Washington July 10, 1780     Jan 11, 1783 Rochambeau's letter to Congress "We are your brothers. We shall conduct ourselves as such with you. We shall fight . . . — Map (db m33706) HM
15Connecticut (Hartford County), Plantsville — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
Southington French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in . . . — Map (db m165804) HM
16Connecticut (Hartford County), Wethersfield — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Wethersfield French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the . . . — Map (db m46299) HM
17Connecticut (New Haven County), Middlebury — Rochambeau Route 1781 – 82
In this vicinity French Troops under Rochambeau enroute to Yorktown encamped during June 1781 Erected by the state and Mattatuck Branch, Sons Amer. Rev. Cooperating — Map (db m19690) HM
18Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — deLauzun Encampment
. . . — Map (db m35311) HM
19Connecticut (New Haven County), Southbury — Rochambeau Route 1781-82
In 1781 and 1782 Jean Baptiste Count de Rochambeau and his French Troops marched by here enroute to and from Yorktown, Va. — Map (db m6429) HM
20Connecticut (New Haven County), Southbury — Where Rochambeau Crossed the Housatonic River1781   *   1954
Near this point Le Comte de Rochambeau crossed the Housatonic River leading the French Army enroute to victory at Yorktown. — Map (db m6432) HM
21Connecticut (New Haven County), Waterbury — Memorial To Two French Soldiers1781 - 1914
This memorial was erected by Patriotic Citizens and Statesmen to commemorate two French Soldiers of Rochambeau's Army who volunteered to fight for American Independence under Washington, enroute from Newport to Yorktown, died and were buried here, . . . — Map (db m36024) HM
22Connecticut (New Haven County), Waterbury — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Waterbury, Middlebury, Southbury French General Jean Baptiste Donation de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 . . . — Map (db m36023) HM
23Connecticut (New London County), Lebanon — Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
Winter Encampment in Lebanon French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After . . . — Map (db m99041) WM
24Connecticut (Tolland County), Bolton — Rochambeau Encampment
In this Vicinity French Troops Under Rochambeau Enroute to Yorktown Encamped During June 1781 Erected by the State and Oxford Parish Chapter D.A.R. Cooperating — Map (db m142365) HM WM
25Connecticut (Tolland County), Bolton — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary RouteBolton
Bolton French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces Arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, . . . — Map (db m140691) HM WM
26Connecticut (Windham County), Scotland — Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary RouteEastern Connecticut
Eastern Connecticut French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces Arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in . . . — Map (db m140334) HM
27Connecticut (Windham County), Sterling — Rochambeau Encampment
In this Vicinity French Troops Under Rochambeau Enroute from Yorktown Encamped During November 1782 Erected by the State and Deborah Avery Putnam Chap. D.A.R. Cooperating — Map (db m140728) HM WM
28Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
A Victorious Allied Army Passed Here-1781 was a momentous year for the United States. A French Army, led by General Rochambeau, had arrived in Rhode Island in July 1780. By June 1781, it was ready to join the U.S. Continental Army against the . . . — Map (db m140088) HM
29Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — A French Legion Kept Watch HereWashington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
During the American Revolution Lauzun's Legion spent the winter and spring of 1782-1783 in Wilmington to help guard Philadelphia and Baltimore from British attack. The troops were housed in the Wilmington Academy, located where the Grand Opera . . . — Map (db m166673) HM
30Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — NCC-246 — Brandywine Village and the Road to Yorktown
On September 4-7, 1781, residents of Brandywine Village watched as thousands of American and French troops marched through their community along the King’s Highway on their way to Yorktown, Virginia. The combined forces, under the commands of . . . — Map (db m140593) HM WM
31District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — General Comte Jean de Rochambeau Memorial — Lafayette Square National Historic Landmark District —
[front, south face:] Rochambeau [back, north face:] "We have been contemporaries and fellow labourers in the cause of liberty, and we have lived together as brothers should do, in harmonious friendship," . . . — Map (db m32973) HM
32Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — On to YorktownWashington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail
On February 20, 1781, George Washington ordered the Marquis de Lafayette with 1,200 men of the newly-established Light Infantry Corps to Virginia to counter Benedict Arnold's raids around Richmond. Lafayette arrived at the Head of Elk on March 3 . . . — Map (db m165791) HM
33Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Crownsville — Belvoir(Scott’s Plantation)
French troops under Count de Rochambeau made their 36th camp here September 16-17, 1781, enroute to Yorktown, Virginia. Most of the troops embarked from Annapolis, but the artillary marched to Georgetown to cross the Potomac River. — Map (db m2928) HM
34Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Crownsville — Count de Rochambeau’s
Count de Rochambeau’s troops marched over this road from Spurrier’s Tavern to “Scott’s Plantation” (Belvoir) on Sept. 16, 1781 on the way to Yorktown. Washington and Rochambeau had gone ahead Sept. 10–11 on the way to Mt. Vernon. — Map (db m2890) HM
35Maryland (Baltimore), Downtown — George Washington Bicentennial Marker
This elm has watched the growth of "Baltimore Towne" for over 100 years, on former estate of John Eager Howard, Revolutionary and 1812 Officer and fifth governor of Maryland. Here, in "Howard's Woods", Count De Rochambeau's troops camped, 1782, . . . — Map (db m5563) HM
36Maryland (Baltimore), Jonestown — On to YorktownWashington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Historic Tail — Road to Victory —
Coming from their camp at White Marsh in the early afternoon of Wednesday, 12 September 1781, the First Brigade of French forces, consisting of the infantry regiments Bourbonnais and Royal Deux-Ponts marched into Baltimore on Pulaski Highway [US . . . — Map (db m166667) HM
37Maryland (Baltimore), Mount Vernon — On To YorktownWashington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route — National Historic Trail —
Our nation never had more at risk than it did in September 1781. The American Revolutionary War—the War for independence—had raged for nearly six years. More than 4,000 American and French troops, allied in their fight against the . . . — Map (db m166497) HM
38Maryland (Baltimore), Stadium Area — On to YorktownWashington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail
Our nation never had more at risk than it did in September 1781. The American Revolutionary War—the War for Independence—had raged for nearly six years. More than 4,000 American and French troops, allied in their fight against the . . . — Map (db m166496) HM
39Maryland (Baltimore County), White Marsh — “Whitemarsh”
Rochambeau’s Troops camped here September 11, 1781 where the baggage train and heavy artillery rejoined them. After the victory at Yorktown the French Troops, in five divisions, camped here again on their way northward, at the end of August 1782. — Map (db m2135) HM
40Maryland (Cecil County), Conowingo — Bald Friar Ford & Ferry
Near Pilot, two and one-half miles northwest of this point, lies the site of a Susquehanna fording used by Indians before the coming of the white man. By 1695, a barge provided ferry service to the colonists. The Conowingo Lake now covers the . . . — Map (db m127912) HM
41Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — ElktonOriginally called “Head of Elk”
Lafayette embarked his troops March 8, 1781 to capture Benedict Arnold. Returned April 9, began overland march to Virginia April 12, 1781. Washington and Rochambeau with their combined forces stopped Sept. 6-7, 1781 on way to . . . — Map (db m154172) HM
42Maryland (Cecil County), Perryville — Count de Rochambeau’s Troops
Crossed the Susquehanna River in five divisions and made their 23rd camp here at the end of August 1782 on the return from Yorktown victory to the north. — Map (db m145428) HM
43Maryland (Cecil County), Port Deposit — Cummings Tavern
Count de Rochambeau’s heavy artillery and baggage train camped here September 9, 1781 before fording the Susquehanna at Bald Friar and proceeding to join the main army on the Philadelphia Road. — Map (db m145653) HM
44Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — On to YorktownWashington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail — Road to Victory —
Upon arrival of French forces in Newport, Rhode Island in July 1780, Baron Ludwig von Closen, a captain in the Royal Deux-Ponts Regiment, was selected by General Rochambeau as one of his aides-de-camp. Closen accompanied Rochambeau on most of his . . . — Map (db m62756) HM
45Maryland (Harford County), Abingdon — Harford Townor Bush
The French Troops of Count de Rochambeau in five divisions camped here at the end of August 1782—the 22nd camp on the return march from the Yorktown victory to the north. — Map (db m1248) HM
46Maryland (Harford County), Churchville — ChurchvilleFormerly called "Lower Cross Roads"
Council of Safety met here 5 April 1775. Considered as site for county seat 1781 George Washington passed 6 May 1775 on way to be made Commander-in-Chief of Army Lafayette and his troops marched past 15 April 1781 on the way to . . . — Map (db m1243) HM
47Maryland (Harford County), Darlington — “Indian Spring”
Count de Rochambeau’s heavy artillery and baggage train camped near this point September 10, 1781. After fording the Susquehanna River at Bald Friar they proceeded to Bush to join the main troops. — Map (db m1283) HM
48Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Count Rochambeau’s TroopsOld Post Road — Established 1666 —
Count Rochambeau’s troops camped here September 9, 1781 after having crossed the Susquehanna River on their way to the siege of Yorktown, VA. — Map (db m146941) HM
49Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Rochambeau Plaza
Named for the French General whose troops passed through here in 1781 en route to Yorktown. Records of the French Army noted plans were underway for a town at this place when the troops returned from Yorktown in 1782. — Map (db m1274) HM
50Maryland (Prince George's County), Beltsville — Site of Van Horn's Tavern
An important stopping place in colonial days. Mentioned by Washington, Lafayette and other noted men after the Revolution. Count de Rochambeau's troops camped here in June 1782 on the return march from the victory at Yorktown. — Map (db m3574) HM
51New Jersey (Bergen County), Mahwah — American Brake Shoe Foundry& Ramapo Valley Road Bridge
          On August 25, 1781 during the historic 600-mile march to what was the Revolutionary War’s decisive Battle of Yorktown, Gen. Rochambeau’s army was forced to ford this river because the bridge that was here was in poor shape. The bridge of . . . — Map (db m165837) HM
52New Jersey (Mercer County), Princeton — “The Washington-Rochambeau Historic Route”
On this site, the allied American and French troops of Generals Washington and Le Comte de Rochambeau encamped August 29 to September 1, 1781 enroute to their Victory at Yorktown American independence was assured there in Virginia by the defeat . . . — Map (db m64117) HM
53New Jersey (Mercer County), Princeton — Campsite of The Army of Louis XVI, King of France
Commanded by General de Rochambeau during their march to victory at Yorktown August 31, 1781 — Map (db m5382) HM
54New Jersey (Mercer County), Princeton — W 3 R
Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail www.w3r-us.org — Map (db m62296) HM
55New Jersey (Mercer County), Trenton — “… a Town laid out called Lamberton …” [1773]
        Historically, Lamberton was the loose-knit fishing village and port that extended along the left bank of the Delaware River from Ferry Street to Riverview Cemetery. The heart of the community lay between Landing and Lalor Streets, exactly . . . — Map (db m165803) HM
56New Jersey (Mercer County), Trenton — Ferries across the Delaware
Two ferries across the Delaware River in the Trenton area date from the late 17th century – the Yardley Ferry and the Trenton or Middle Ferry. Two more – the Upper and Lower Ferries – were added later in the 18th century. The . . . — Map (db m166091) HM
57New Jersey (Morris County), Chatham — Chatham Historic District
Scene of Washington’s Headquarters and massing of Continental troops prior to march on Yorktown August 27 – 29, 1781. — Map (db m8877) HM
58New Jersey (Morris County), Hanover Township — A Good Place for a Halt
“ . . . Whippany will be a good place for a halt . . . ” Washington to Rochambeau On August 27 and 28, 1781, a 5,000-man French Army under General Count Rochambeau encamped on grounds extending northeast from here toward the . . . — Map (db m36418) HM
59New Jersey (Morris County), Pequannock Township — Mandeville Farm Encampment Site
          King Louis XVI’s French Army under the command of General Count de Rochambeau camped here on the Mandeville Farm in August 1781.           The troops were marching from Rhode Island to join General Washington and the Continental Army . . . — Map (db m165914) HM
60New Jersey (Morris County), Towaco — Henry Doremus House
Circa 1760 Dutch Stone House where George Washington and Alexander Hamilton stayed June 25-27, 1780, following the Battle of Springfield. French forces under Gen. Rochambeau rested in the orchard August 27, 1781, en route to Yorktown. . . . — Map (db m165838) HM
61New Jersey (Somerset County), Griggstown — Historic River Road and River Crossing
Route of Continental Army of Morristown after Battle of Princeton, Jan. 3, 1777. Route also of armies marching from New York to Yorktown, VA. Aug. 30-31, 1781. — Map (db m16700) HM
62New Jersey (Somerset County), Liberty Corner — French Army Encampment
General Rochambeau's troops camped here in August 1781 en route to the Battle of Yorktown. — Map (db m20152) HM
63New Jersey (Somerset County), Liberty Corner — The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
On this site French Troops under Le Comte De Rochambeau encamped August 29, 1781 en route to meeting Gen. George Washington and achieving their victory at Yorktown, American independence was assured there in Virginia by the defeat and surrender of . . . — Map (db m11580) HM
64New York (Dutchess County), Fishkill — Continental Army CrossroadsWashington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail
During the Revolutionary War, the Van Wyck Homestead served as headquarters for the Fishkill Supply Depot, a supply center for Washington’s Continental Army. At this bustling “city” of industry, hammers clanged, and smoke rose from many . . . — Map (db m88752) HM
65New York (Dutchess County), Fishkill — The Path to VictoryWashington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail
In 1781, the American and French allies combined their armies at a pivotal turning point in the Revolutionary War. Under the command of General George Washington and French General Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, the armies . . . — Map (db m88758) HM
66New York (Rockland County), Stony Point — A Crucial Crossing
Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail During the American Revolution, King’s Ferry was the most secure Hudson River crossing north of British-held New York City. It was the key connecting New England with the rest . . . — Map (db m165722) HM
67New York (Rockland County), Stony Point — King’s Ferry
. . . — Map (db m8227) HM
68New York (Rockland County), Stony Point — The Path to Victory
Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail In 1781, the American and French allies combined their armies at a pivotal turning point in the Revolutionary War. Under the command of General George Washington and French . . . — Map (db m165738) HM
69New York (Rockland County), Suffern — Rochambeau’s Encampment1781 – 1782
After crossing the Hudson, Commander-in-chief of the French army in America, General Jean-Baptiste Rochambeau, encamped here with his 5000 troops en route from Newport, R.I. to Virginia. Joining with Gen. Washington, the two armies hurried to . . . — Map (db m25761) HM
70New York (Westchester County), Verplanck — In Grateful Remembrance
Dedicated to the soldiers of the Continental and French armies who crossed the Hudson River here at King’s Ferry August 20-26, 1781 on their march to Victory at Yorktown, Va. May their sacrifices and hardships never be forgotten, the Liberty and . . . — Map (db m166067) HM
71New York (Westchester County), Verplanck — King’s Ferry Offered a Safe CrossingWashington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Nat’l Hist Trail
You will be pleased on the receipt of this, to order One hundred and fifty Men to bring thirty of the aforesaid Boats to Kings Ferry . . . ” Washington to Alexander McDougall, August 18, 1781 In August 1781, the . . . — Map (db m101118) HM
72New York (Westchester County), Verplanck — The Path to VictoryWashington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Nat’l Hist Trail
In 1781, the American and French allies combined their armies at a pivotal turning point in the Revolutionary War. Under the command of General George Washington and French General Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, the armies . . . — Map (db m101116) HM
73New York (Westchester County), Yorktown Heights — French Hill — The Road to Victory During the American Revolution —
French Hill - The Road to Victory During the American Revolution Background: During the American Revolution, the Americans needed the help of the French to secure their hopes of independence. In 1778, thanks to the efforts of Ben . . . — Map (db m165929) HM
74Rhode Island (Newport County), Newport — Mary Ferrazzali Park
Mary Ferrazzoli (1928-1994) was the visionary leader who founded the Friends of the Waterfront in 1982. She vigorously championed public access and stood firmly opposed to the commercial overdevelopment of the Newport waterfront blocking public . . . — Map (db m59981) HM
75Rhode Island (Newport County), Newport — Rochambeau
[ Left Marker : ]On June eighteenth, 1781, General Rochambeau left Newport with his army to join the American forces on the Hudson, and on August nineteenth, 1781, the combined armies under command of General Washington began their . . . — Map (db m48054) HM
76Rhode Island (Providence County), Providence — Rochambeau's Army in Rhode Island
A turning point in the American Revolution came in February 1780, when the King of France approved a plan to send an army to help the Americans. A French fleet carrying thousands of soldiers arrived fie months later in Newport, where they spent . . . — Map (db m151723) HM
77Virginia (Alexandria), Historical District — E-106 — Washington-Rochambeau RouteAlexandria Encampment
Most of the American and French armies set sail from three ports in Maryland—Annapolis, Baltimore, and Head of Elk—in mid-Sept. 1781 to besiege the British army in Yorktown. The allied supply-wagon traln proceeded overland to Yorktown, . . . — Map (db m8570) HM
78Virginia (Fairfax County), Lorton — E-107 — Colchester
Colchester, founded in 1753 at the location of a ferry crossing, was the second town established in Fairfax County. Located on the main post road from Boston to Charleston, and at the end of the Ox Road leading west to the Blue Ridge, the town . . . — Map (db m206) HM
79Virginia (Fairfax County), Mount Vernon — The Washington-Rochambeau Route to Victory
On August 14, 1781, Generals Washington and Rochambeau received news that a large French fleet under the command of Admiral de Grasse was headed for the Chesapeake Bay carrying 3,000 French soldiers. There the British general, Cornwallis, was . . . — Map (db m902) HM
80Virginia (Fairfax County), Mount Vernon — Washington-Rochambeau Route
General Washington, in 1781, rode 60 miles in one day from Baltimore to Mount Vernon, which he had not visited for over 6 years. General Rochambeau arrived next day with his and Washington’s staff. They spent Sept. 10 and 11 at Mount Vernon before . . . — Map (db m883) HM
81Virginia (Hanover County), Hanover — Washington-Rochambeau Route
General Washington and General Rochambeau passed here on Sept. 13, 1781 on their way to victory at Yorktown. One mile south, they turned east on state route 605. The marking of this route is a gift from the French Government. Committee of the . . . — Map (db m166341) HM
82Virginia (James City County), Toano — W-33 — Burnt Ordinary
First called John Lewis's Ordinary and then Fox's, Burnt Ordinary received its name in Jan. 1780 when, according to the Virginia Gazette, Fox's Ordinary burned to the ground. Later, in Oct. 1781, when the French army's wagon train passed by, . . . — Map (db m16846) HM
83Virginia (James City County), Williamsburg — W-49 — Trebell's Landing
At Trebell's Landing on the James River a mile southwest of here, the artillery and stores of the American and French Armies were located in September 1781. They were then conveyed overland some six miles to the siege lines at Yorktown. The troops . . . — Map (db m9501) HM
84Virginia (New Kent County), New Kent — WO-16 — New Kent Courthouse
Lord Cornwallis's army was here, moving eastward, June 22, 1781; Lafayette, in pursuit, June 25; Washington, Rochambeau and Chastellux, on their way to Yorktown, September 14, 1781. A part of Joseph E. Johnston's army, retiring to Richmond, passed . . . — Map (db m17738) HM
85Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Potomac Path
The Potomac Path, or King’s Highway, was a major transportation route linking the northern and southern colonies in colonial America. Following an ancient Indian trail, the road assumed great importance for overland travel between the colonies and . . . — Map (db m5365) HM
86Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — E-53 — Revolutionary War Campaign of 1781
The roads through Prince William County were important routes for the Revolutionary War campaign of 1781. In April, the Marquis de Lafayette passed through the county on the King's Highway with a portion of Gen. George Washington's Continental Army. . . . — Map (db m166461) HM
87Virginia (Prince William County), Triangle — Road to YorktownThe King’s Highway
In the late 18th century, armies made the most use of the King’s Highway. Merchants preferred to move goods such as tobacco over the Potomac River since land travel was difficult. The road became a main transportation route after the Revolutionary . . . — Map (db m4890) HM
88Virginia (Prince William County), Triangle — Road to YorktownThe Kings Highway
In the late 18th century, armies made the most use of the King’s Highway. Merchants preferred to move goods such as tobacco over the Potomac River since land travel was difficult. The road became a main transportation route after the Revolutionary . . . — Map (db m92678) HM
89Virginia (Prince William County), Triangle — The Potomac PathThe King’s Highway
The King’s Highway was the first north-south route through Virginia. The road began in Boston and ended in Williamsburg. It may have followed one or more trails that American Indians used before European colonization. The route was first . . . — Map (db m4891) HM
90Virginia (Prince William County), Woodbridge — 6 — Potomac Path
To the east is the only preserved segment of the Potomac Path, the earliest north-south route in northern Virginia. Following an ancient Indian trail, the road, later known as the King's Highway, assumed great importance for overland travel between . . . — Map (db m2164) HM
91Virginia (Prince William County), Woodbridge — The Potomac PathThe King's Highway
The King’s Highway was the first north-south route through Virginia. The road began in Boston and ended in Williamsburg. It may have followed one or more trails that American Indians used before European colonization. The route was first . . . — Map (db m5959) HM
92Virginia (Prince William County), Woodbridge — Washington-Rochambeau Wagon Route
In September 1781, General George Washington directed the repair and clearing of roads leading to and from Wolf Run Shoals, the main ford of the Occoquan River, located seven miles upstream from the main ferry at Colchester. Prince William and . . . — Map (db m40209) HM
93Virginia (Stafford County), Stafford — E-79 — Peyton’s Ordinary
In this vicinity stood Peyton’s Ordinary. George Washington, going to Fredericksburg to visit his mother, dined here, March 6, 1769. On his way to attend the House of Burgesses, he spent the night here, October 31, 1769, and stayed here again on . . . — Map (db m2187) HM
94Virginia (Virginia Beach), Fort Story — Battle of the Capes
On the morning of September 5, 1781, a line of 19 British warships appeared off this cape, headed for Chesapeake Bay. Surprised at anchor in the mouth of the bay, the crews of 24 French warships scrambled out to challenge them. Both fleets sailed . . . — Map (db m23139) HM
95Virginia (Virginia Beach), Fort Story — Battle of the Capes 1781
In September 1781, a naval engagement between two powerful fleets denied British forces access to the Chesapeake Bay and trapped Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown. This little known battle helped end British domination in America. What led to this . . . — Map (db m138094) HM
96Virginia (Virginia Beach), Fort Story — François Joseph Paul de Grasse — Cape Henry Memorial, Colonial National Historical Park —
This statue, a gift from France is placed here, overlooking the waters where Admiral Comte de Grasse successfully engaged the British Fleet on September 5, 1781. The “Battle of the Capes” prevented crucial reinforcements from reaching . . . — Map (db m32983) HM
97Virginia (Virginia Beach), Fort Story — French British Naval Engagement Off the Virginia CapesSeptember 5, 1781
"…I wish it was in my power to express to Congress how much I feel myself indebted to the Count of deGrasse and his fleet…" G. Washington Oct 19, 1781 "…I consider myself infinitely happy to have been of some service to the United . . . — Map (db m138085) HM
98Virginia, Williamsburg — Washington–Rochambeau Route
Generals Washington and Rochambeau and their staffs arrived in Williamsburg on September 14, 1781. Here they gathered their troops and supplies prior to laying siege to Cornwallis at Yorktown 12 miles away on September 28, 1781. The . . . — Map (db m10123) HM
99Virginia (York County), Yorktown — American Encampment1781 Siege of Yorktown — Colonial National Historical Park —
“The American troops encamped in a wood within a mile of the Enemy’s left line – and the French troops encamped on their right.” Lieutenant William Feltman, Pennsylvania Battalion, September 28, 1781 On September 28, . . . — Map (db m10862) HM
100Virginia (York County), Yorktown — Comte de Rochambeau1781 Siege of Yorktown — Colonial National Historical Park —
I hasten to impart to you the happiness I feel at the welcome news of your arrival; and as well in the name of the American army as my own name to present you with an assurance of our warmest sentiments for allies who have so generously come to . . . — Map (db m11071) HM

102 entries matched your criteria. The first 100 are listed above. The final 2 ⊳
 
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Feb. 28, 2021