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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Historically Black Colleges and Universities Historical Markers

This series is intended for markers describing historical events, persons, and buildings related to the 100+ Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). A list of HBCUs can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_historically_black_colleges_and_universities.644 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 444
 
José Alejandro Peña Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. Makali Bruton, March 11, 2018
José Alejandro Peña Marker
Dominican Republic, Distrito Nacional, Santo Domingo — José Alejandro Peña
José Alejandro Peña Nació en el preludio de aquella revolución abrileña en la capital dominicana. Logró su título en Estudios Internacionales y Ciencias Políticas en West Virginia State University, donde también estudió dirección . . . — Map (db m118377) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — 1 — Southern Railway Station AttackJanuary 2, 1961 — Anniston Civil Rights Trail —
Local "Jim Crow" laws in the first half of the 20th century enforced racial segregation in public transportation facilities throughout the South. The U.S. Supreme Court decision in Boynton v. Virginia (1960) upheld that segregation in these . . . — Map (db m106602) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — Trailways AttackSeeking Justice
1st Panel Two busloads of Freedom Riders arrived in Alabama on Sunday, May 14, 1961, bound for New Orleans. It was an organized effort by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) to challenge the South's continued defiance of U. S. . . . — Map (db m106721) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Carlton — Mt. Nebo Death Masks
Side 1 Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Mt. Nebo Cemetery is home to the unique folk art of African American inventor and artist, Issac "Ike" Nettles, who used concrete to make images of living people's faces for . . . — Map (db m101576) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Thomasville — Williams’ Temple CME Church
Founded by the CME (Christian Methodist Episcopal) Church as the only school for black students in the area in the early 1900’s, Williams’ Temple eventually consolidated with another school in Booker City to form Miles College near Birmingham. . . . — Map (db m101596) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Lime Hill — Reverend Hillary James Hawkins, D.D.1905-1995
Side 1 Doctor Reverend Hillary James Hawkins, who was affectionately known throughout the community as “Brown,” dedicated most of his adult life to providing spiritual guidance to blacks in Evergreen and surrounding . . . — Map (db m81292) HM
Alabama (Dale County), Ozark — D. A. Smith High School/ Professor D. A. Smith, PrincipalDale County
D. A. Smith High School Dale County The first school building on this site for African Americans was constructed in 1939 and was named Ozark Negro High School. It was replaced during the “separate but equal” period in 1952 and . . . — Map (db m132087) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Tabernacle Baptist ChurchDallas County
Side 1 In January 1885, Dr. Edward M. Brawley, President, Alabama Baptist Normal and Theological School (now Selma University) formed Tabernacle Baptist Church to be an integral part of the students' Christian formation and education. . . . — Map (db m82034) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Gallion — Freetown
In 1867 a group of African American men and women laid the foundations for Freetown. William, John, Albert, George, Richard, and Peter Collins; Susan and Lawrence Moore; Thomas Jeffries; the children of John Jeffries; and Louisa Conway and her . . . — Map (db m38192) HM
Alabama (Jackson County), Stevenson — Averyville
During the Reconstruction Period following the Civil War, a freedmen’s community was established in this area called Averyville, named for the Pennsylvania minister and successful businessman Charles Avery, a longtime and faithful champion of Negro . . . — Map (db m108803) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Emory Overton Jackson1908 - 1975
Emory Overton Jackson was born on September 8, 1908 in Buena Vista, Georgia to Will Burt and Lovie Jones Jackson. E. O. Jackson and his seven siblings were raised in the middle-class Birmingham enclave of Enon Ridge, located on the west side of town . . . — Map (db m64736) HM
Alabama (Limestone County), Athens — Fort Henderson / Trinity School - 1865-1970
Fort Henderson Built on this site in 1863 by federal forces occupying Athens. It was a five-sided earthen fort with some frame buildings and underground bomb-proofs. Abatis lined the fifteen-foot deep perimeter ditch, a small portion of which . . . — Map (db m41787) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Franklin — Franklin's Educational Legacy
Franklin School, originally constructed on this lot, was in operation as early as the 1890s teaching grades 1-11. By the mid 1930s, it was downsized to grades 1-6. There were northern and southern classrooms adjoined by a common auditorium. The . . . — Map (db m68028) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Notasulga — Birthplace of Zora Neale HurstonNotasulga, Alabama — Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) —
Side 1 Celebrated author Zora Neale Hurston was born in Notasulga on January 7, 1891. Her parents, John Hurston and Lucy Potts met here, at the Macedonia Baptist Church. but moved to Eatonville, Florida where Zora grew up. Through . . . — Map (db m95110) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Shorter — Prairie Farms Resettlement Community
(obverse) Beginning in the mid-1930s during the Great Depression, the federal New Deal promoted Land Resettlement to move farmers across the nation off worn out soil to new farmland. The Resettlement Administration, and its successor the . . . — Map (db m68000) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 9 — "Trade With Your Friends"The Tuskegee Boycott — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
In 1957, local government officials in Tuskegee, Alabama sought to gerrymander the city's limits in an attempt to diminish the number of black votes in upcoming elections. Alabama state senator Sam Engelhardt sponsored Act 140, which transformed . . . — Map (db m139876) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 7 — Area Churches That Hosted Important Civil Rights Meetings — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Churches within the African American community played an important role during the civil rights movement. They were places beyond control of white power structure, as well as locations where people could express themselves without reprisal. They . . . — Map (db m139884) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — Brief History of Tuskegee, Alabama
Tuskegee consists of 80 square miles and is the county seat of Macon County, Alabama. Tuskegee rests in the heart of the rural Alabama Black Belt and is 40 miles east of Montgomery. Tuskegee was founded by General Thomas S. Woodward in 1833 after he . . . — Map (db m99679) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 13 — Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church developed out of the Tuskegee Baptist Church, originally organized in 1842. Although both whites and blacks (slaves) initially worshipped at the same location, the white congregants built a new facility in 1858, . . . — Map (db m139880) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 10 — Rosa Parks — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (1913 – 2005) was an iconic activist during the mid twentieth century civil rights movement. Born in Tuskegee, Parks later moved with her mother to Pine Level located near Montgomery, Alabama. She was encouraged by . . . — Map (db m134670) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 12 — Samuel "Sammy" Leamon Younge, Jr. — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Samuel "Sammy" Leamon Younge, Jr. (1944-1966), a civil rights and voting rights activist, was the first African American university student killed during the civil rights movement. A Tuskegee native, Younge was attending Tuskegee University when . . . — Map (db m139875) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — The Tuskegee Veterans Administration Hospital
The Tuskegee Veterans Administration Hospital (VA), established in 1923, is significant as the first VA hospital in the nation to be administered by an all African American medical staff. After WWI, African American veterans found it difficult . . . — Map (db m101900) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 11 — Tuskegee High School — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
In August of 1963, the United States District Court M. D. Alabama sided with the plaintiff in Lee v. Macon County Board of Education. This pivotal civil rights case involved the integration of, the all-white Tuskegee High School (located on . . . — Map (db m139878) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 8 — William P. Mitchell(1912-1986) — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Following World War II, Tuskegee's black population began to grow, and many sought to register to vote. Perceiving a threat to their political power, white politicians tried to control the black vote through a variety of techniques. These actions . . . — Map (db m139877) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — New Vistas
Moton Field was built by Tuskegee Institute, now Tuskegee University, in 1941 after the school contracted with the U.S. Army to provide primary flight training for the nation's first African American military pilots. By the end of World War II . . . — Map (db m99940) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — The Control TowerTuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
From Moton Field’s Control Tower, controllers directed flight operations and signaled landing instructions to pilots through a system of flashing colored lights. Dispatchers called cadets for their flights. The tower overlooked the busy – . . . — Map (db m64363) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 1 — Amelia Boynton Robinson — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Amelia Boynton Robinson (1911 2015) was a voting rights activist and civil rights icon. Born on August 18, 1911, in Savannah, Georgia, she received her bachelor's degree in home economics from Tuskegee University in 1927. In 1934, Mrs. Boynton . . . — Map (db m139890) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Birth of Trades Program — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site —
We shall prosper . . . as we learn to dignify and glorify labor and put brains and skills into the common occupations of life. —Booker T. Washington Tuskegee Institute's vocational training program began in this . . . — Map (db m101934) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Campus Architect — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site —
. . . I should consider it a far-reaching calamity for us to lose Mr. Taylor at Tuskegee. —Booker T. Washington Look at the buildings around the main quadrangle. Much of what you see is the work of Robert R. Taylor, . . . — Map (db m101929) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Carver's Laboratory — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site —
The primary idea in all of my work was to help the farmer and fill the poor man's empty dinner pail . . . —George Washington Carver George Washington Carver taught classes and developed new products from peanuts, . . . — Map (db m101938) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 2 — Charles Goode Gomillion — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Charles Goode Gomillion (1900-1995) was born on April 1, 1900, in Johnston, South Carolina. He joined the faculty at Tuskegee University in 1928, where he served as dean of students and chair of the social sciences department. He was president of . . . — Map (db m140006) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Dining and Social CenterTuskegee Institute National Historic Site — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The young women all seated first, and then the young men march in. But no conversation is allowed until . . . a simple grace is chanted by the chorus of a thousand voices. —Booker T. Washington, The Working . . . — Map (db m101926) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Enhancing Health Care — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site —
Let our societies spend less money in taking care of the sick, and much more money in promoting the health of the race . . . . Let us make health contagious in every community rather than disease. —Booker T. Washington, Address . . . — Map (db m101940) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Frederick Douglass Hall1904
Named for Frederick Douglass, famed runaway slave, abolitionist and statesman. Douglass came to Tuskegee in 1892 and delivered the 11th Annual Commencement address in which he "urged economy, thrift and common sense." Those words of Douglass . . . — Map (db m101908) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Great PhilanthropistsTuskegee Institute National Historic Site — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
I will be very glad to pay the bills for the library building . . . and I am glad of this opportunity to show the interest I have in your noble work. —Andrew Carnegie Carnegie Hall is named for Andrew Carnegie, . . . — Map (db m101923) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Huntington Hall1900
Built as a girls dormitory with funds donated by the widow of Collis P. Huntington, philanthropist, and president of the C & O (Chesapeake & Ohio) Railroad. Huntington Hall was designed by architect, Robert R. Taylor, the first African American . . . — Map (db m101907) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 6 — Jessie Parkhurst Guzman — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Jessie Parkhurst Guzman (1898-1996) was born in Savannah, Georgia, educated at Howard University (BA, 1919) and Columbia University (MA, 1924), and worked at Tuskegee University for over forty years. During Guzman's time at Tuskegee University, she . . . — Map (db m139885) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 4 — Julius Rosenwald — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Julius Rosenwald (1862-1932) was a Jewish multimillionaire merchant and one of the founders (1906) of Sears, Roebuck, and Company, then the largest department store in the United States. Rosenwald was a member of the Tuskegee University Board of . . . — Map (db m134671) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Managing the School — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site —
. . . the school is not dependent upon the presence of any one individual. The whole executive force . . . is so organized . . . that the machinery of the school goes on day by day like clockwork. —Booker T. Washington, . . . — Map (db m101922) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Porter Hall 1883 / Huntington Academic Building 1905
Porter Hall 1883 Porter Hall was the first building erected on the Tuskegee campus. The building housed administrative offices, library reading and recitation rooms, chapel, kitchen, dining room, living quarters and laundry. It . . . — Map (db m101915) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Site of Olivia Davidson HallMen's Dormitory
Site of Olivia Davidson Hall Men's Dormitory 1886 – 1954 Originally Samuel Armstrong Hall 1886 - 1892 — Map (db m101914) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — The Burnt Place — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site —
At the time we occupied the place there were standing upon it a cabin, formerly used as the dining room, an old kitchen, a stable, and an old hen-house. Within a few weeks we had all of these structures in use.   —Booker T. . . . — Map (db m101916) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — The Tuskegee Airmen's Plaza
This plaza is dedicated to the memory of the Tuskegee Airmen, including General Daniel "Chappie" James, whose training at Tuskegee University and the Tuskegee Army Air Field enabled them to prove for all time the competence and bravery of Black . . . — Map (db m20076) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 3 — The Tuskegee Institute Advancement League — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
The Tuskegee Institute Advancement League (TIAL) was a student-based organization started in 1963 and reorganized in 1965 during the school integration crises. It originally sought to gain a measure of academic freedom through input with the . . . — Map (db m139886) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Thrasher Hall
Thrasher Hall, renovated in 1983. Was built in 1893 by teachers and students using brick they made. Only the exterior walls remain from the original building. The bell above rang for class changes. It was located in the building's bell tower until . . . — Map (db m101905) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 5 — Tuskegee Civic Association — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
The Tuskegee Civic Association, whose offices were located here, started out of The Men’s Meeting of the 1920s and the Tuskegee Men’s Club of the 1930s. On April 13, 1941, in order to increase its effectiveness and to embrace all segments of the . . . — Map (db m139923) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Tuskegee UniversityF-4C Phantom
This U.S. Air Force F-4C Phantom Jet Fighter was flown by General "Chappie" James, Tuskegee University graduate and first Black Four-Star General in the U.S. Armed Services, on his last combat mission--Operation Bold--over Southeast Asia. It flies . . . — Map (db m101902) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Up From Slavery — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site —
I determined when quite a small child . . . I would in some way get enough education to enable me to read common books and newspapers. —Booker T. Washington, Up From Slavery Booker T. Washington changed the . . . — Map (db m101932) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — White Hall1910
Named in honor of Alexander Moss White of Brooklyn, New York, with funds donated by his children. This structure opened fall 1909. The building was officially dedicated in January 1910 was a dormitory for women. A bronze tower with clock was added . . . — Map (db m101906) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Oakwood CollegeFounded 1896
Oakwood College, which began as an industrial school, was founded by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1896 to educate African Americans in the South. The school was erected on 380 acres purchased during the previous year for $6,700. Additional . . . — Map (db m34953) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Oakwood CollegeFounded 1896
Oakwood College, which began as an industrial school, was founded by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1896 to educate African Americans in the South. The school was erected on 380 acres purchased during the previous year for $6,700. Additional . . . — Map (db m34955) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Original Site of Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University
(Front) Original site of Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (now located at Normal, Alabama) Legislature approved 9 December 1873 "a normal school for the education of colored teachers" in Huntsville. Ex-slave William Hooper . . . — Map (db m85546) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Rev. Dr. Joseph E. Lowery Boyhood Home Site(Dean of Civil Rights Movement)
Side A Dr. Joseph Echols Lowery was born in Huntsville on Oct 6, 1921, to Dora and Leroy Lowery. He grew up in Lakeside (Methodist) church. He began his education in Huntsville, spent his middle school years in Chicago, and returned to . . . — Map (db m85550) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Normal — Alabama A&M University former names / Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical UniversityNormal, Alabama
Alabama A&M University former names 1873 - Colored Normal School at Huntsville 1885 - The Huntsville State Colored Normal and Industrial School 1896 - The State Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes 1919 - The State Agricultural and . . . — Map (db m39760) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Normal — Councill Training School(1919 - 1970)
In 1919, the first building was erected nearby with funds provided locally and supplemented with a Julius Rosenwald Foundation grant. Named for William H. Councill, Alabama A&M University founder, the three-room structure was built for black . . . — Map (db m39761) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Normal — William Hooper CouncillFounder — Alabama A&M University —
"...A tower of knowledge, of strength, of power ...Let us build..." Dr. William Hooper Councill served as President of Alabama A&M University and was the catalyst for its early development from its founding in 1875 until his death in 1909. . . . — Map (db m39763) HM
Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — 1 — Andrew N. Johnson
Andrew N. Johnson, born 1865 in Marion, Alabama, graduated from Talladega College in 1886, and taught in rural Alabama. On this site in 1894, he established the Mobile Weekly Press, a voice for African-Americans, "A.N.", a powerful member of the . . . — Map (db m111347) HM
Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — 6 — Caldwell School
Opened in 1887 as Broad Street Academy, this was the site of Mobile's first public high school for African Americans. The building was razed in 1947, and a new elementary school was constructed and named in recognition of William Caldwell, the first . . . — Map (db m111353) HM
Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — 15 — Dr. Thomas N. Harris
Dr. Harris, born April 6, 1868, in Montgomery, Alabama was one of the earliest black physicians to practice medicine in Mobile. He graduated in 1899 from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee with dual degrees in dentistry and medicine. To . . . — Map (db m86400) HM
Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — 17 — Dunbar/Central High School
Dunbar School was built on this site in 1924. Dr. W.A. Caldwell was its first principal. In 1947, the Old Medical College on St. Anthony Street was remodeled and became Central High School. Dr. Benjamin Baker was named principal. In 1955, the . . . — Map (db m111386) HM
Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — 35 — St. Louis Street Missionary Baptist Church
The church was organized in 1853 by ten African-Americans who were former members of Stone Street Baptist Church. It is the second oldest Missionary Baptist Church in Alabama. The first three pastors were Caucasian; however, following passage of the . . . — Map (db m86578) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Alabama State University / Tatum Street
Side 1 Alabama State University The Early Years Founded in 1867, the Lincoln School in Marion, Alabama became the first state-assisted normal school for African Americans in 1874. The school prospered in that location for 13 . . . — Map (db m71345) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Alabama State University / Tullibody
Side A Founded 1866 as the Abraham Lincoln Normal School in Marion, Alabama by nine former slaves. Operated from 1868 until 1874 by the American Missionary Association. The school began to receive state funding in 1874, making it the first . . . — Map (db m86061) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Aurelia Eliscera Shines BrowderCivil Rights Pioneer
Side 1 Aurelia Eliscera Shines Browder was born January 29, 1919, in Montgomery, Alabama. She graduated with honors in 1956 from Alabama State Teachers College (now Alabama State University). In April 1955, Browder's refusal to give up . . . — Map (db m71349) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Beulah Baptist ChurchOrganized 1880
Beulah Baptist Church was organized in the home of Monday and Dora Duvall, on the corner of Hull and Winnie Streets. Rev. William (Billy) Jenkins served as the pastor when the first church building was erected on Norton Street. Beulah served as the . . . — Map (db m71377) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Birth of Montgomery Bus BoycottBoycott planned & publicized here at ASU's Councill Hall
Side 1 On Dec. 1, 1955, at Alabama State College (now Alabama State University) in a basement room in Councill Hall, the Montgomery Bus Boycott was planned and publicized after the arrest that day of Rosa Parks, who refused to give up . . . — Map (db m91279) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Centennial Hill
This neighborhood evolved around historic First Congregational Church established through the American Missionary Association (AMA) October 6, 1872, by Pastor George Whitfield Andrews. In 1867 the AMA and the Freedmen's Bureau, headed by General . . . — Map (db m86067) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Charlie and Lucille TimesCivic Leaders and Civil Rights Activists
Lucille and Charlie (d. 2/7/78) Times were married on February 3, 1939. Shortly after, the Times' joined the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Mr. Times received several medals and a Commendation for his service in . . . — Map (db m81804) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Elijah Cook / City of Montgomery v. Rosa Parks
Elijah Cook Educator, Businessman, Lawmaker Born a slave in Wetumpka in 1833, Elijah Cook became a leader in Montgomery’s African American community. Credited with helping to establish the city’s first school for blacks in the basement . . . — Map (db m69222) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — First Baptist Church(Brick-A-Day Church)
Organized in 1866, this pioneering congregation grew out of First Baptist Church, now on Perry Street, where early parishioners had worshipped as slaves. The first building, facing Columbus Street, was erected in 1867. Nathan Ashby served as first . . . — Map (db m36499) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Historic Sites Near Fairview Environmental Park
Role of MIA The Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) was founded on December 5, 1955, to implement the 382-day Montgomery Bus Boycott that jumpstarted the 20th-century Civil Rights Movement. The MIA, as its name suggests, remains dedicated . . . — Map (db m129484) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Home of Ralph David Abernathy(March 11, 1926-April 30, 1990)
This was the home of Dr. Ralph David Abernathy, a central leader of the historic events of the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. Abernathy graduated from Alabama State University in 1950 and from Atlanta University in 1951. He and his family lived . . . — Map (db m71232) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Loveless School/Henry Allen Loveless
(side 1) Loveless School Montgomery's first junior and senior high schools for African American students began in Loveless School. Built in 1923 and enlarged in 1930, this building first housed seven grades; the opening of Carver . . . — Map (db m71082) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Marshall J. Moore House
In 1900, Marshall Moore and his wife, Agnes V. McClain commissioned Joseph G. Nesbitt, Sr., an African-American contractor/builder, to construct this Victorian period cottage. The Moores, among the first graduates and early faculty members of . . . — Map (db m86130) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Old Ship A.M.E. Zion Church
This congregation was organized by the Court Street Methodist Church in the early 1850s. The latter group offered their 1835 wood frame building to the black members if they would relocate it. In 1852 the church was moved to this site under the . . . — Map (db m72170) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Rosa Parks Branch Library / Bertha Pleasant Williams
Side 1 Rosa Parks Branch Library Second public library for blacks in City of Montgomery, this building opened in 1960 as Montgomery Branch Library on Cleveland Avenue. Designed by architect James Miller Davis, it served the black . . . — Map (db m71388) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — South Jackson Street / Victor Hugo Tulane
Side 1 South Jackson Street Long a home to African-American professionals, politicians, and businessmen, South Jackson Street is in the heart of Centennial Hill, a neighborhood which developed in the 1870s. One block north at . . . — Map (db m71354) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — St. Paul A.M.E. Church
By the turn of the twentieth century, African Americans were gathering on Hardaway Street in a brush arbor to worship. In 1907, they incorporated what is now known as St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church, with Rev. Felix Strum serving as the . . . — Map (db m127279) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — The Frank M. Johnson, Jr. Federal Building and US Courthouse
Side 1 Named in honor of Judge Frank M. Johnson, Jr. (1918-1999), who served here as U.S. District Judge from 1955-1979, as U.S. Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit July 12, 1979 - October 1, 1981, and . . . — Map (db m71266) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — The Hon. Rufus A. Lewis1906 - 1999
Lewis began an earnest voting rights drive in the early 1940s. Credited with registering 4 generations of Montgomery voters. He established Citizenship Schools that tutored prospective black voters to fill out the literacy text, a barrier before the . . . — Map (db m86429) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Pike Road — Georgia Washington School
Miss Georgia Washington founded the Peoples Village School for black students on this site in 1893. Georgia Washington was born a slave November 23, 1851 in Virginia. As a student at Hampton Institute, Virginia, she met Dr. Booker T. Washington who . . . — Map (db m72010) HM
Alabama (Perry County), Marion — Lincoln Normal School
On July 17, 1867, nine ex-slaves (James Childs, Alexander H. Curtis, Nicholas Dale, John Freeman, David Harris, Thomas Lee, Nathan Levert, Ivey Pharish and Thomas Speed) formed and incorporated the “Lincoln School of Marion.” They soon . . . — Map (db m70096) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — First African Baptist ChurchTuscaloosa, Alabama
Organized November 1866, with 144 members. The Rev. Prince Murrell, first pastor, served until 1885. A church building located at corner of 4th Street and 24th Avenue was purchased and became place of worship during pastorate of the Rev. James . . . — Map (db m40408) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — First Presbyterian ChurchTuscaloosa
Organized 1820. Moved to this site 1830. Present structure erected 1921. Under the leadership of Dr. Charles A. Stillman, (Minister, 1869-1895) it sponsored the founding of Stillman College in 1876. Its bell was the subject of a poem by . . . — Map (db m35364) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — Stillman College
Founded as Tuscaloosa Institute 1876 by Presbyterian Church U.S. under leadership of Dr. Charles Allen Stillman, pastor of First Presbyterian Church, Tuscaloosa, to train Black ministers. Renamed Stillman Institute 1894 for Dr. Stillman, first . . . — Map (db m35676) HM
Alabama (Wilcox County), Snow Hill — Snow Hill Normal and Industrial Institute1893
(obverse) Snow Hill Institute was founded in 1893 by William James Edwards, a graduate of historic Tuskegee Institute established by Booker T. Washington in 1881. Snow Hill’s lineage extends back to Hampton Institute where Washington . . . — Map (db m68185) HM
Arkansas (Independence County), Batesville — Lafferty Memorial Church
Lafferty disbanded in 1969 and its members requested the church at 8th and Neeley be sold and funds divided between Philander Smith College and the First United Methodist Church of Batesville. The known history of Lafferty, organized in the . . . — Map (db m70560) HM
California (Los Angeles County), San Pedro — S.S. Lane Victory — Port of Los Angeles —
Panel 1: 1945: March: Lane Victory is named for the former slave, Isaac Lane, founder of Lane College, in Jackson, Tennessee. The Victory Ship was one of a class of cargo ships designed and built during World War II by the . . . — Map (db m131429) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Delaware State College
Established May 15, 1891, by an act of the Delaware General Assembly as the State College for Colored Students, by virtue of the 1890 Morrill Land-Grant Act under the provisions of the 1862 Morrill Act of Congress. Incorporated July 1, 1891. . . . — Map (db m39054) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-45 — Delaware State College High School
On June 17, 1921, the Board of Trustees of the State College for Colored Students, later known as Delaware State College, approved a resolution recommending the establishment of a high school for Negro students on its campus. This was the second . . . — Map (db m142491) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Dupont SchoolDelaware State University — Making our mark on the world —
From 1921 until 1952 this simple brick structure, named for its benefactor, Pierre S. Dupont, served as a laboratory-classroom for students enrolled in the teaching course at the State College for Colored Students (now DSU). The educational . . . — Map (db m142492) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — K-60 — Loockerman Hall
In 1723 Nicholas Loockerman purchased 600 acres of land known as “The Range.” Following his death in 1771, the property passed to his grandson Vincent Loockerman Jr. Evidence suggests that he built the Georgian-style mansion known today . . . — Map (db m39053) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — Archaeology in Adams MorganSurveying the Cemeteries in Walter Pierce Park, 2005-2013
In 2013, Howard University archaeologists, working with concerned citizens, completed a seven-year survey of Walter C. Pierce Community Park. Their goal: to identify and protect two 19th Century cemeteries--the Colored Union Benevolent . . . — Map (db m112588) HM WM
District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 4 — Life on the ParkRoads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
During the Civil War (1861-1865), the Union Army Carver Hospital and barracks occupied Meridian Hill. The facilities attracted African American freedom seekers looking for protection and employment. By war’s end, a Black community had put down . . . — Map (db m130705) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 18 — The Sage of AnacostiaAn East-of-the River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
This imposing property once belonged to Anacostia’s most famous resident: Frederick Douglass. After escaping slavery as a young man, Douglass rose to become a distinguished abolitionist, writer, publisher, and orator. By the 1860s Douglass was . . . — Map (db m88723) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Atlas District — 13 — Enterprising FamiliesHub, Home, Heart — Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail —
The small scale and low rents of H Street's oldest buildings have lured waves of immigrant entrepreneurs since the buildings were new in the 1880s. By 1930, alongside Greek, Italian, Irish, and other immigrant-owned shops, at least 75 . . . — Map (db m71690) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Bloomingdale — Barnett Aden GalleryAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 127 Randolph Place, NW —
The Barnett Aden Gallery, which operated on the first floor of this house between 1943 and 1968, was the first privately owned black art gallery in the United States. It was founded by James Vernon Herring (1897-1969), chair of Howard University's . . . — Map (db m110518) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Bloomingdale — 8 — Court Nullifies Racial CovenantsWorthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
In the 1940s, Homeowners in the 100 block of Bryant Street breached a contract when they sold their houses to African Americans. Covenants, or agreements, in their real estate deeds prohibited "the sale of the house to anyone of the Negro race" . . . — Map (db m130828) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Bloomingdale — 14 — Great ExpectationsWorthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
Bloomingdale of the 1940s and '50s was a village of high expectations. Within a block of this sign lived four young women who grew up to be judges. Anna Diggs Taylor rose to chief judge of the U.S. District Court in Michigan. The daughter . . . — Map (db m130843) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Bloomingdale — 13 — Home to HeadlinersWorthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
Edward Brooke, who represented Massachusetts in the U.S. Senate from 1967 to 1979, was the first African American elected to the Senate in the 20th century. Brooke was born at 1938 Third Street and later lived with his family at 1730 First . . . — Map (db m130842) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Bloomingdale — 7 — Separate SchoolsWorthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
The Nathaniel Gage School for white children opened here in 1904, when Washington's public school system was segregated. By the 1930s, even though LeDroit Park was an African American neighborhood, Gage remained white only. "I had to walk by the . . . — Map (db m130839) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 6 — School DaysBattleground to Community — Brightwood Heritage Trail —
The School Building Just Ahead of You Opened In 1912 as the Military Road School, the area's third public elementary for African Americans. For decades it was the only public school serving black children in Upper Northwest and nearby . . . — Map (db m110235) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brookland — Charles Richard Drew Memorial Bridge
. . . — Map (db m6262) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brookland — Lois Mailou Jones ResidenceAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1220 Quincy Street, NE —
Lois Mailou Jones (1905-1998), internationally acclaimed artist and teacher, lived here from the 1950s into the 1970s. Born and educated in Boston, Jones joined the Howard University Art Department in 1930 and stayed for nearly 50 years. She began . . . — Map (db m111784) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brookland — Sterling A. Brown ResidenceAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1222 Kearny Street, NE —
Sterling Brown (1901-1989) was a central figure of the New Negro Renaissance of the 1920s and '30s and the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and '70s. Brown's work includes Southern Road (1932), The Negro in American Fiction (1937), and . . . — Map (db m111799) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — Mary McLeod Bethune
Mary McLeod Bethune 1875–1955 Let her works praise her. I leave you love. • I leave you hope. • I leave you the challenge of developing confidence in one another. • I leave you a thirst for education. • I leave you a . . . — Map (db m5505) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Carver Langston — Langston Terrace Dwellings/Hilyard RobinsonAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 21st Street and Benning Road, NE —
Langston Terrace Dwellings, opened in 1938, was the first federally funded public housing project in Washington and among the first in the nation. It honors John Mercer Langston (1829-1897), abolitionist, founder of Howard University Law School, and . . . — Map (db m112792) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Colonial Village — Frank D. ReevesAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 7760 16th Street, NW —
Frank D. Reeves (1916–1973), a lawyer and civil rights activist, was part of the team that shaped the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case outlawing school segregation. He advised Senator John F. Kennedy on minority . . . — Map (db m24679) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — Campus to Army Camps and Back AgainMeridian Hill Park, National Historic Landmark — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
President Monroe singed a charter in 1821 that established Columbian College on a site north of Florida Avenue between 14th and 15th Streets, Columbian College moved to Foggy Bottom in 1912 and became George Washington University, but the original . . . — Map (db m63771) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — Charles R. Drew and Lenore Robbins DrewAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 3324 Sherman Avenue, NW, Apartment 1 —
Dr. Charles R. Drew (1904-1950), renowned for his blood plasma research, was associated with Howard University College of Medicine during most of his career. In 1941 Drew joined a national effort to set up a blood banking process but left because . . . — Map (db m65523) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 15 — College HillCultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail —
Wayland Seminary opened in Foggy Bottom just after the Civil War to train formerly enslaved people and others as “preachers and teachers for the South” and as missionaries to evangelize Africa. In 1875 it moved here, later merging . . . — Map (db m130745) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 8 — Girard Street ElitesCultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail —
The 1100 and 1200 blocks of Girard Street once were home to a “Who’s Who” of African American leaders. This and nearby “double-blocks” are the heart of John Sherman’s Columbia Heights subdivision. By placing all houses . . . — Map (db m130747) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 7 — Nob HillCultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail —
For Nearly 50 Years, this corner was home to Nob Hill Restaurant, one of the nation's first openly gay bars for-and run by-African Americans. Started in the 1950s as a private social club, Nob Hill went public in 1957. Patrons enjoyed . . . — Map (db m86014) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Deanwood — 5 — A Whirl on the Ferris WheelA Self Reliant People — Greater Deanwood Heritage Trail —
To your right it is the former Merritt Educational Center which operated from 1943 to 2008. However, if you were standing here in the 1920s or '30s, in its place you would have seen exuberant crowds of fashionably dressed African Americans . . . — Map (db m130780) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — 5850-2019 — Elizabeth Keckley1818 - 1907
Elizabeth Hobbs Keckley (1818-1907), born into slavery in Virginia, was hired out as a seamstress. With money from clients, she bought her own and her son's freedom in 1855. She gained renown as a dressmaker after moving to Washington, where First . . . — Map (db m141279) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Dupont Circle — Alma Thomas ResidenceAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1530 15th Street, NW —
Alma Thomas (1891-1978), the nationally acclaimed abstract artist, lived in this house from 1907 until her death. In 1924 she became the first graduate of Howard University's Art Department — and possibly the first black woman in the country . . . — Map (db m110908) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Dupont Circle — Charles Hamilton Houston ResidenceAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1744 S Street, NW —
Charles Hamilton Houston (1895-1950) was a legal theorist and mentor to an entire generation of African American lawyers. As Howard University School of Law's vice dean, the Harvard-educated Houston helped transform the school into an accredited . . . — Map (db m97798) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Dupont Circle — Historic Kappa HouseAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1708 S Street, NW —
Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity was founded at Indiana University in 1911. The ten founders determined from the start that membership would be based solely on achievement. In 1949 the fraternity's Washington Alumni Chapter worked with undergraduate . . . — Map (db m93390) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Dupont Circle — 326 — Myrtilla MinerDupont Circle — Diverse Visions | One Neighborhood —
Myrtilla Miner (1815-1864), born near Brookfield, NY, was an idealistic white teacher who came to Washington to teach African Americans. In 1853, with funding from northern abolitionists, she paid $4,000 for a three-acre site at 20th and N Sts. . . . — Map (db m89607) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Dupont Circle — 10 — Strong Families and Eminent CitizensCity Within a City — Greater U Street Heritage Trail —
The fine rowhouses in this part of the Shaw neighborhood, such as those on this street, were once home to many of the community’s old families and most distinguished citizens. Charles Hamilton Houston, a national leader in civil rights, was . . . — Map (db m130795) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Dupont Circle — Todd Duncan ResidenceAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1600 T Street, NW —
Internationally renowned baritone Todd Duncan (1903-1998) lived here from about 1935 until about 1960. Duncan originated the role of Porgy in George Gershwin's opera Porgy and Bess on Broadway. He later refused to perform the role at DC's . . . — Map (db m97801) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Forest Hills — "Music of the Spheres"
[Top plaque:] "Music of the Spheres" Artist: Martha Jackson Jarvis Commissioned by Fannie Mae Dedicated July 10, 2003 [Center plaque:] Fannie Mae: Van Ness Sculpture Project Martha Jackson-Jarvis The . . . — Map (db m114358) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Early African American Georgetown
Georgetown's first African Americans were brought as slaves to labor for the tobacco industry and for domestic service in the houses of wealthy tobacco merchants. Others came as freed men and women before and after the Civil War. Over time, in the . . . — Map (db m113639) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Margaret Peters and Roumania Peters WalkerRose Park Tennis Courts
The families of the Peters Sisters, Friends of Rose Park, DC Department of Parks & Recreation, and the City of Washington, DC are proud to name the Rose Park Tennis Courts after the Peters Sisters who grew up in this neighborhood on O Street, NW. . . . — Map (db m97732) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — 3 — A Voice from the SouthWorthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomington Heritage Trail —
This Circle Honors Anna Julia Haywood Cooper the educator and civil and women's rights advocate who lived in the gracious house at 201 T Street from 1916 until her death in 1964 at age 105. Born into slavery, Cooper graduated from Oberlin . . . — Map (db m130832) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — 6 — Best in the CountryWorthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
Poet May Miller once remarked that unlike New York's Harlem, LeDroit Park “didn't have to have a renaissance.” In fact, before they joined the cultural movement of the 1920s and '30s, most Harlem Renaissance intellectuals spent time . . . — Map (db m130838) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — Freedmen's HospitalAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington DC — 520 W Street, NW —
Freedmen's Hospital was established by the federal government in 1862 to address the needs of thousands of African Americans who poured into the city seeking freedom during the Civil War. The hospital's first administrator was Major Alexander T. . . . — Map (db m84805) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — 4 — Government GirlsWorthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
To your right is Lucy Diggs Slowe Hall, a Howard University dormitory. It opened in 1942 as U.S. government housing for African American women who came to DC to take new war-related jobs or fill in for men who left to join the military during . . . — Map (db m130836) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — 5 — Griffith Stadium"Lift Every Voice" — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
“I used to come home every night, get a quarter from my mother, run to Griffith Stadium, and sit in the bleachers,” Abe Pollin once said. “I would look out at these good seats and say, ‘Some day, maybe I will get a good seat.’ . . . — Map (db m130756) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — Griffith Stadium SiteAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington DC — 2041 Georgia Avenue, NW —
Before Howard University Hospital was built in 1975, Griffith Stadium stood here. Constructed in 1914, the stadium was one of the few public spaces that were open to everyone during the segregation era. It was home to the Homestead Grays of the . . . — Map (db m107755) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — 2 — T Street ElitesWorthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomington Heritage Trail —
The Roster of LeDroit Park's accomplished African Americans is long. Consider these prominent Washingtonians who lived on T Street. Walter E. Washington and his wife, Bennetta Bullock Washington, lived with her family at 408 T Street. Mrs. . . . — Map (db m130830) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — 16 — The Doctor Is InWorthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
When I was at Dunbar, I thought I wanted to be a doctor. In our community, doctors were the men who made the most money, earned the most respect and had the prettiest wives." Sen. Edward W. Brooke, Bridging the Divide: My . . . — Map (db m130846) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — 15 — The Prettiest PlaceWorthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
Before there was a LeDroit Park, map engraver David McClelland owned a mansion on the property across Rhode Island Avenue. When the Civil War broke out in April 1861, McClelland possessed a detailed map of Washington that suddenly had great . . . — Map (db m130844) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — 5 — The University Next DoorWorthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
Howard University's Employment, educational, and cultural opportunities have attracted and kept families in LeDroit Park and Bloomingdale for generations. Ettyce Hill Moore, a third generation Washingtonian who grew up at 128 V Street in the . . . — Map (db m113985) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Logan Circle — 2 — Advancing the RaceA Fitting Tribute — Logan Circle Heritage Trail —
Across the street is St. Luke's Episcopal Church, completed in 1880 by DC's first black Episcopalian congregation. Founding pastor Alexander Crummell was a prominent African American intellectual. After 20 years as a missionary in Liberia, . . . — Map (db m130848) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Logan Circle — Alain Locke ResidenceAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1326 R Street, NW —
Alain Locke (1886-1954), a leading 20th-century intellectual and the nation's first black Rhodes Scholar, was a central figure in the New Negro (sometimes called the Harlem) Renaissance. Locke edited The New Negro (1925), an anthology of . . . — Map (db m110915) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Logan Circle — Bethune Museum-ArchivesNational Historic Site — Designated October 15, 1982 by Act of Congress —
Born on July 10, 1875, in Mayesville, South Carolina, Mary McLeod Bethune was the daughter of sharecroppers. After attending Scotia Seminary in North Carolina she founded Daytona School for Negro Girls which became Bethune-Cookman College. A leader . . . — Map (db m17502) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Logan Circle — 12 — Care for the CityA Fitting Tribute — Logan Circle Heritage Trail —
Luther Place Memorial Church has been a neighborhood fixture since 1873, when the Maryland Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church established it as a "memorial to God's goodness in delivering the land from slavery and from war." It quickly . . . — Map (db m130857) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Logan Circle — 6 — Logan Circle, Just AheadA Fitting Tribute — Logan Circle Heritage Trail —
Some of the City's finest Victorian Houses ring Logan Circle. While the area appears on the L'Enfant Plan of 1791, it took Alexander “Boss” Shephard's improvements to make these grand houses of the 1870s and '80s possible. Three . . . — Map (db m130851) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Logan Circle — 11 — Striving for EqualityA Fitting Tribute — Logan Circle Heritage Trail —
This building was the headquarters of the National Council of Negro Women from 1943 to 1966. Political activist and educator Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) founded NCNW in 1935 in her nearby apartment. She moved the organization here eight . . . — Map (db m130856) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Mahaning Heights — 14 — From Gambling to Garden ApartmentsA Self-Reliant People — Greater Deanwood Heritage Trail —
If you had stood here 100 years ago, you might have heard the cheering crowds and thundering hoofbeats of Benning Racetrack just across the tracks to your right. Beginning in 1890, Benning was the best-equipped race course in Washington. . . . — Map (db m130786) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Mayfair — Mayfair Mansions/Albert I. CassellAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 3819 Jay Street, NE —
Mayfair Mansions, completed in 1946 on the site of the old Benning Race Track, was one of the city's earliest garden apartment developments. The 500-unit, first-class complex was designed by Howard University Professor of Architecture Albert I. . . . — Map (db m136186) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Mount Vernon Square — Central Public LibraryAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — Mount Vernon Square —
This majestic building was opened in 1903 as the Central Public Library, popularly known as the Carnegie Library because Andrew Carnegie donated funds to build it. From the start Central was open to all. Mary Church Terrell and historian John . . . — Map (db m18794) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), NoMa/Sursum Corda — 2 — Gateway to The Nation's CapitalHub, Home, Heart — Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail —
With its view of the Capitol and Senate office buildings, and with the Library of Congress and the Supreme Court just a short stroll away, Union Station truly is the gateway to the heart of the nation's government. The station is also where . . . — Map (db m71679) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Park View — 15 — "Treat Me Refined"Lift Every Voice — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
The House at 3017 Sherman Avenue once was a boardinghouse for Howard University students. In 1923 a determined and talented young woman from the tiny town of Eatonville, Florida, lived here while earning an Associates Degree at Howard. In a . . . — Map (db m130759) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Park View — 16 — From Beer Garden to Park ViewLift Every Voice — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
"Innumerable colored Chinese lanterns ... shedding that dim uncertain light which is the delight of lovers and the poetry of beer drinking" — Washington Post, June 1879 Back when this area was open fields, . . . — Map (db m99221) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Park View — 17 — The Next WaveLift Every Voice — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
Caribbean immigrants discovered this stretch of Georgia Avenue in the 1940s, bringing island culture along with jerk chicken, curry, and coco bread. Many, like Eric Williams, who later led Trinidad and Tobago to independence in 1962, came to . . . — Map (db m130769) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Park View — 14 — Urban OasisLift Every Voice — Georgia Avenue/Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
These Rowhouses Were Built by developer Harry Wardman, whose houses, hotels, and apartment buildings are known for elegant, solid construction. When these became available in 1912, buyers snapped them up. Among them were an electrician, a . . . — Map (db m130770) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — 5850-2019 — Alma Thomas1891 - 1978
Painter Alma Thomas (1891-1978) was Howard University's first fine arts graduate, in 1924, and that same year began teaching art at Shaw Junior High School. Upon retiring from Shaw in 1960, Thomas finally had time to focus on her own work. That is . . . — Map (db m141272) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — .4 — The Roots of Freedom and EqualityCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail —
“It is known to you that events have transpired within the last few days, deeply affecting the peace and character of our community.” With these words, city officials tried to calm the angry mobs gathering on this . . . — Map (db m25271) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — 10 — "Strike!"Lift Every Voice — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
Howard University has a long history of student activism for civil rights, peace, and academic reform. Students of the 1930s and '40s protested lynchings nationwide and DC businesses that snubbed African Americans. In the early 1960s . . . — Map (db m130758) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — "The Divine Nine Help Shape Black American History"
"The Divine Nine Help Shape Black American History" [Years of the "Divine Nine" historically black fraternities’ and sororities' founding shown] 1906 [Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity founded at Cornell University] 1908 [Alpha Kappa Alpha . . . — Map (db m142280) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — 13 — Along the "Nile Valley"Lift Every Voice — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
With its Afro-centric shops and connections to Howard University, this stretch of Georgia Avenue has been called the “Nile Valley.” Blue Nile Botanicals opened first at 2826 Georgia in 1977. Hodari Ali, a former editor of Howard’s . . . — Map (db m130761) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Andrew F. Hilyer Residence SiteAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 2352 Sixth Street, NW —
Andrew F. Hilyer (1858-1925) fought racism and promoted the "moral, material, and financial interests" of African Americans through the Union League of the District of Columbia, which he co-founded in 1892. Hilyer's Union League Directory . . . — Map (db m111803) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Centennial Year, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority
Commemorating the Centennial Year Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated. Rankin Chapel, site of the Founder's Window erected in honor of the Sixteen Pillars of AKA, January 14, 1978. Dr. Barbara A. McKinzie, Centennial International . . . — Map (db m15659) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — 8 — Cleaning Up CowtownLift Every Voice — Georgia Avenue/Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
The area west of this spot once was an Irish and German immigrant neighborhood known as “Cowtown.” That's because, before 1871, cows, pigs, and sheep roamed freely here, while those kept in Washington City, south of Boundary Street . . . — Map (db m130763) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Day of Honor 2000
African American • Asian American Hispanic American • Native American Day of Honor 2000 Still pursuing victory over prejudice at home WWII VV — Map (db m115574) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — 7 — Ed Murphy WayLift Every Voice — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
Back In The '60s, everyone came to Murph's. Ed Murphy's Supper Club, that is, located across Georgia Avenue from 1963 to 1975. In the beginning suits and ties were mandatory for the club's high­powered male patrons. But as the Black Power . . . — Map (db m130773) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Fortitude
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. commissioned Chicago artist James King to create a sculpture of its Founders. "Fortitude" was dedicated on April 28, 1979. She stands 12' 6" with a 12' hand-to-hand arm span. Sculpted in Corten steel, the metal was . . . — Map (db m112009) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Founders Library and Moorland-Spingarn Research CenterAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 500 Howard Place, NW, Howard University Campus —
Founders Library houses wide-ranging collections, the university's museum, and the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, one of the world's largest repositories dedicated to the culture and history of people of African descent. Dedicated in 1939, the . . . — Map (db m116653) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — General Oliver O. Howard
Residence of General Oliver O. Howard founder of Howard University 1869 - 1874 — Map (db m9263) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Howard HallAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington D.C. — 607 Howard Place, NW —
Howard Hall was completed in 1869 as the home of white Civil War General Oliver Otis Howard (1830-1909), for whom Howard University was named. As commissioner of the Bureau of Refuges, Freedman and Abandoned Lands (Freedman's Bureau), General Howard . . . — Map (db m65707) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Howard UniversityAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — Sixth Street and Howard Place, NW —
Howard University, one of the oldest Black colleges in the United States, was established by Congress in 1866 to educate formerly enslaved individuals. Its name honors Freedman's Bureau Commissioner General Oliver Otis Howard, a member of the white . . . — Map (db m66401) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Howard University Gallery of ArtAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington DC — Lulu Vere Childers Hall, Howard University Campus —
The Howard University Gallery of Art was established in 1928 on the lower level of Rankin Chapel. Professor James V. Herring (1897-1969), founder of the University's Art Department, and professor and artist James A Porter (1905-1970) were its first . . . — Map (db m85112) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Kelly Miller Residence SiteAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 2225 Fourth Street, NW —
Kelly Miller (1863-1939), a prominent Howard University scholar and leader, taught mathematics and sociology. He went on to serve as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Miller laid the groundwork for the formation of African American sociology . . . — Map (db m111801) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — 6 — Medical Care for All"Lift Every Voice" — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
During the Civil War (1861-1865), thousands of formerly enslaved people came to Washington in search of new lives. They needed work, education, shelter – and health care. In 1862 the U.S. government responded with Freedmen’s Hospital, . . . — Map (db m130764) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Miner Teachers CollegeAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 2565 Georgia Avenue, NW —
Miner Teachers College, which operated here from 1914 until 1955, was the principal school training black teachers in the city for more than 70 years. Named for Myrtilla Miner (1815-1864), a white educator who founded Miner Normal School in 1851, . . . — Map (db m114359) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.Founded November 17, 1911 — Howard University, Washington, D.C. —
Front of Marker: Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. Founded November 17, 1911 Howard University Washington, D.C. Manhood Founder Edgar A. Love 1891 - 1974 Dedicated Nov. 16, 1975 Sampson P. . . . — Map (db m112012) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Phi Beta Sigma
In tribute to three visionary Howard University students, the Founders of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., A. Langston Taylor of Tennessee, Leonard F. Morse of Massachusetts and Charles I. Brown of Kansas, who here resolved in 1914 to establish a . . . — Map (db m112008) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Sara Winifred Brown, M.D.The National Association of University Women — Incorporated 1924, District of Columbia —
In Recognition of Sara Winifred Brown, M.D. Her medical degree was awarded by Howard University in 1904. She served as the first female graduate trustee of Howard University, 1924-1948. In 1910, she was one of the founders of the . . . — Map (db m112010) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Tau Beta Pi
Tau Beta Pi National Engineering Honor Society D.C. Alpha Chapter Chartered in 1956 "Dedicated to excellence" — Map (db m110807) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — 9 — Teachers and PreachersLift Every Voice — Georgia Avenue./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
As the Civil War was ended in 1865, most formerly enslaved African Americans arriving in the District could not read or write. The following year members of the First Congregational Society considered organizing a school to train teachers and . . . — Map (db m130765) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — 11 — The Lake So BlueLift Every Voice — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
The body of water that inspired the line in Howard University’s alma mater, “far above the lake so blue stands old Howard firm and true,” is McMillan Reservoir, which opened in 1902 to supply water to the city. The reservoir and the . . . — Map (db m130766) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Will Marion Cook Family Residence SiteAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 2232 Sixth Street, NW —
Will Marion Cook (1869-1944) was an internationally renowned violinist and composer. After studying music at Oberlin College (Ohio) and the National Conservatory of Music (New York), Cook turned to creating musical comedies. Among them was . . . — Map (db m111802) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.
Presented during the 75th Anniversary of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. Founded January 16, 1920 Jylla Moore Foster, Grand Basileus Grace Walker Phillips, Memorial Chair July 16, 1995 Builder: M.C.M.C. Designers: Terrence Brown & . . . — Map (db m115573) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Shaw — 9 — The Fires of 1968Midcity at the Crossroads — Shaw Heritage Trail —
The assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on Thursday, April 4, 1968, changed this neighborhood forever. When word of Dr. King’s murder spread that evening, Washingtonians gathered along busy 14th and U streets, NW; H . . . — Map (db m130892) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest — 14 — Housing Reform and the Syphax SchoolRiver Farms to Urban Towers — Southwest Heritage Trail —
In the 1890s, American cities had a common problem. The working poor lived in deteriorating housing, often no better than wooden shacks. In Washington much of this housing lined the city's hidden alleys. But people needed healthier and safer . . . — Map (db m130914) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Live Oaks: A Gathering Place
Welcome to the Reading Grove This space provides a place to meet, rest, read, and reflect. Live oaks have long harbored gatherings, from religious services and classes to community celebrations. Witness Trees Trees that were . . . — Map (db m143315) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Truxton Circle — Baker's Dozen, Inc. BuildingAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1509 and 1511 Fourth Street, NW —
Starting in 1950, the Baker's Dozen, Inc. Youth Center operated here in two formerly derelict buildings redesigned by architect Howard H. Mackey. The youth center was the project of the Baker's Dozen social club, founded in 1944 by 13 members of . . . — Map (db m111760) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — 6 — A Home Away From HomeCity Within a City — Greater U Street Heritage Trail —
The Thurgood Marshall Center for Service and Heritage occupies the historic Italian Renaissance-style building of the 12th Street YMCA, known after 1972 as the Anthony Bowen YMCA. The 12th Street YMCA was the first African American YMCA in . . . — Map (db m130788) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — 11 — A Shared NeighborhoodCity Within a City — Greater U Street Heritage Trail —
Although Washington, D.C., has been a racially segregated city for much of its history, black and white Washingtonians have shared parts of this neighborhood.

The modern building across 15th Street sits on the site of Portner Flats, . . . — Map (db m130802) HM

District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — Artillery / With Freedom Came Their Cultural Icons
(front) Artillery There were thirteen artillery regiments and one independent battery in the Bureau of the United States Colored Troops Unknown Soldier Image courtesy of the Library of . . . — Map (db m113680) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — Cavalry / With Freedom Came Their Schools
(front) Cavalry There were seven cavalry regiments in the Bureau of the United States Colored Troops. Unknown Soldier Image courtesy of the Library of Congress (back) With Freedom Came Their . . . — Map (db m113681) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — Frelinghuysen University/Jesse Lawson and Rosetta C. LawsonAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1800 Vermont Avenue, NW —
Frelinghuysen University was founded in 1917 to provide education, religious training, and social services for black working-class adults. Founders include Jesse Lawson, a Howard University-educated lawyer; his wife Rosetta C. Lawson, an advocate . . . — Map (db m48407) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — 5 — Howard University Sets the StandardCity Within a City — Greater U Street Heritage Trail —
To the northeast rises the tower of Founders Library at Howard University - an institution created in 1867 that has trained and inspired generations of African American leaders and has been a lodestar for its own community. The highest . . . — Map (db m130791) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — John Wesley Cromwell ResidenceAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1439 Swann Street, NW —
Lawyer, scholar, and publisher John Wesley Cromwell (1846-1927) lived here from 1894 until his death. Born enslaved in Portsmouth, Virginia, Cromwell moved to Washington in 1871 to study law at Howard University. He published the weekly People's . . . — Map (db m96273) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — Mary Ann Shadd Cary ResidenceAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1421 W Street, NW —
[On Fence:] When the lists of African American “firsts” are read, Mary Ann Shadd Cary’s name is everywhere. Born in Delaware to a free Black abolitionist family, Cary (1823-1893) moved to Canada in 1850 and ran a racially . . . — Map (db m61813) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — Pioneers / With Freedom Came Their Community
(front) Pioneers Pioneers, also known as engineers, cut roads for ambulances, and built bridges, railroads and other construction projects. Unknown Soldier Image courtesy of the Library of . . . — Map (db m113678) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — Sailors / With Freedom Came the Greater YOU
(front) Sailors African descent sailors served in an integrated navy as boys, landsmen, stewards, cooks, seamen, firemen, pilots, navigators, and engineer officers. Unknown Sailor African American Civil War . . . — Map (db m113677) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — Scurlock Studio SiteAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 900 U Street, NW —
Addison Scurlock (1883-1964) was the photographer of black Washington, specializing in dignified portraiture. In 1911 he opened a studio at 900 U Street (just west of the building of that address erected in 1999). The Scurlock Studio photographed . . . — Map (db m109162) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — Washington Afro-American Newspaper Office BuildingAfrican American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 1800 11th Street, NW —
The independent weekly Afro-American, one of the most enduring Black newspapers in the country was founded in Baltimore in 1892 by John H. Murphy, Sr. The Washington Afro-American began publication in 1932, and operated from this . . . — Map (db m55538) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), U Street Corridor — 1 — You Had to Wear a TieCity within a City — Greater U Street Heritage Trail —
You are standing on Washington’s historic Black Broadway–the heart of African American life in Washington, D.C. from about 1900 to the 1950s. Duke Ellington, its most famous native son, grew up, was inspired, trained, and played his first . . . — Map (db m130799) HM
Florida (Alachua County), Gainesville — Florida 4-H
Head, Heart, Hands, and Health Florida 4-H began as a program to teach farming methods to rural youth and became a community-based program that taught millions of young Floridians how to Learn By Doing. In 1909, UF Dean of Agriculture J.J. . . . — Map (db m135971) HM
Florida (Duval County), Jacksonville — F-448 — Abraham Lincoln Lewis Mausoleum
Pioneer Abraham Lincoln Lewis (1865-1947) and others founded Florida’s oldest African-American insurance company, Afro-American Life in 1901, which spread throughout the South as far as Texas. In 1926, A.L. Lewis opened Lincoln Golf and Country Club . . . — Map (db m58382) HM
Florida (Duval County), Jacksonville — F-790 — Centennial Hall Edward Waters College
Founded in 1866, Edward Waters College (EWC) is the oldest historically black college in Florida. The history of the college is closely tied to the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. In 1865, the Reverend Charles H. Pearch, a presiding elder . . . — Map (db m93073) HM
Florida (Duval County), Jacksonville — F-234 — Joseph E. Lee
(side 1) Joseph E. Lee, one of Florida's most distinguished adopted sons, was born in Philadelphia in 1849. Shortly after obtaining a law degree from Howard University in 1873, Lee began to practice in Florida as Jacksonville's first black . . . — Map (db m129570) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-986 — 1963 Civil Rights Protest Jail Overflow Site
(Side 1) Throughout the 1950s-1970s, large-scale, nonviolent demonstrations by audacious students attending Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU), Florida State University, and the University of Florida, as well as local . . . — Map (db m135553) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-831 — Coach Alonzo "Jake" Gaither Home
This brick house was the home of legendary Florida A&M University (FAMU) football coach Alonzo “Jake” Gaither and his wife, Sadie, a FAMU English professor. The couple regularly hosted sports and public figures from the 1950s-1960s, . . . — Map (db m128319) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-389 — Florida A&M University
Founded in 1887 as the State Normal College for Colored Students, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) is the only historically state supported educational facility for African Americans in Florida. It has always been . . . — Map (db m79570) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-397 — Florida A&M University
Founded in 1887 as the State Normal College for Colored Students, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) is the only historically state supported educational facility for African Americans in Florida. It has always been . . . — Map (db m79571) HM

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