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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Pennsylvania Railroad Historical Markers

Markers related to America's largest railroad by traffic/revenue throughout the twentieth century and at one time the world's largest publicly-traded corporation.
 
Other Side of Marker image, Touch for more information
By Tom Fuchs, January 19, 2008
Other Side of Marker
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — Delaware Avenue & Columbus Circle, NEHistorical Information — UNION STATION – Architecture by Daniel Burnham 1908
Designed in the Beaux-Arts style, this was the world's largest train station when it opened - the station and terminal zone originally covered approximately 200 acres and included 75 miles of tracks. For over half a century its coffered ceilings and . . . — Map (db m8442) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), NoMa/Sursum Corda — 1 — "All Aboard"Hub, Home, Heart — Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail
Union Station, across First Street, was the world’s largest railroad terminal when it opened in 1907. Its construction took five years and displaced hundreds of small houses and businesses. Architect Daniel Burnham’s Beaux-Arts masterpiece, with . . . — Map (db m71678) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Early Transportation Routes
The Gwynns Falls Trail follows a valley that has served as both a transportation avenue and an obstacle since the days of American Indians and European colonists. Early roads were privately owned turnpikes that charged tolls; they became public . . . — Map (db m6352) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Bowie — Bowie Railroad Station Museum
The Baltimore and Potomac Railroad, chartered in 1853, inaugurated train service on July 2, 1872 with a line to Washington, and on January 1, 1873 opened the Pope's Creek line to southern Maryland. At the junction of the two lines the town of Bowie . . . — Map (db m646) HM
New Jersey (Burlington County), Bordentown — First movement by steam on a railroad in New Jersey
First movement by steam on a railroad in the state of New Jersey, November 12, 1831, by the original locomotive "John Bull" now deposited in the United States National Museum at Washington. The first piece of railroad track in New Jersey was laid by . . . — Map (db m5195) HM
New Jersey (Essex County), Newark — Penn Station Historic Site
Penn Station, designed by the architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White, opened in 1935 and is an outstanding example of Art Deco exterior and interior design. Penn Station replaced the Pennsylvania Railroad's old Market Street station which had . . . — Map (db m527) HM
New Jersey (Mercer County), Trenton — Canals and Railroads – Arteries to the Heart of Industrial Trenton
As the United States began to feel the full force of the Industrial Revolution and expand its own manufacturing and commercial base, cities like Trenton that were blessed with an advantageous location were in the forefront of transportation . . . — Map (db m4298) HM
New Jersey (Middlesex County), Woodbridge — Great Woodbridge Train Wreck of 1951
In memory of the 85 people who perished on February 6, 1951, when a Pennsylvania Railroad Commuter Train derailed ¼ of a mile (1300 feet) south of this station, and in recognition of the Woodbridge residents and those of the surrounding communities . . . — Map (db m6678) HM
Ohio (Franklin County), Columbus — 94-25 — Original Port Columbus Airport Terminal1929-1958
[Marker Front]: The original Port Columbus Airport terminal was founded by the people of Columbus and was one of the first airport facilities in the United States. Dedicated on July 8, 1929, Port Columbus was the first transfer point in the . . . — Map (db m12731) HM
Pennsylvania (Bedford County), Bedford — Pennsylvania Turnpike
This is one of the original service plazas for the nation's first long-distance superhighway. On October 1, 1940, the Turnpike opened, stretching 160 miles from Irwin to Carlisle. The Turnpike Commission had been created in 1937; construction . . . — Map (db m8188) HM
Pennsylvania (Bedford County), Bedford — Pennsylvania Turnpike
This is one of the original service plazas for the nation's first long-distance superhighway. On October 1, 1940, the Turnpike opened, stretching 160 miles from Irwin to Carlisle. The Turnpike Commission had been created in 1937; construction . . . — Map (db m8816) HM
Pennsylvania (Blair County), Altoona — Altoona
Founded 1849 as a terminal for westward expansion of the Pennsylvania Railroad. It soon became a major railroad center of the nation. Scene of the War Governors' Conference, 1867. — Map (db m52337) HM
Pennsylvania (Blair County), Altoona — Pennsylvania Railroad Shops
The PRR built its first repair facilities here in 1850 and opened its first track to Altoona during the same year. By 1925, Altoona was home to the nation's largest concentration of railroad shops, with 16,500 people employed in several locations. — Map (db m20998) HM
Pennsylvania (Blair County), Altoona — PRR Class D78F Dining Car No. 4468
"You had to be a waiter - a good one - to work in the Dining Department. You worked 16 and 17 hours a day. Half the time we had to sleep in the dining car." - James Corbett, Dining Car Waiter For passengers, eating aboard a train was always an . . . — Map (db m53730) HM
Pennsylvania (Blair County), Altoona — PRR Class N5 Cabin Car (or Caboose) No. 477577
"A lot of them put curtains in there and little rugs.... They had a pot-bellied stove and they were all good cooks." - Richard Jackson, Yardmaster On the road, freight crews climbed up into the cupola, inspecting the train ahead for signs of . . . — Map (db m52606) HM
Pennsylvania (Blair County), Altoona — PRR Class X29L Steel Boxcar No. 2136
"Freight was different. The railroad started doubling up on the trains something fierce - 160-car trains. It would take you a week to get to the other end of them." - Vince Farabaugh, Locomotive Engineer Yardmaster John Conlon remembers one . . . — Map (db m52629) HM
Pennsylvania (Blair County), Altoona — Scale Test Weight Car
One of the more unusual pieces of railroad equipment is the "scale test weight car" such as displayed here. Railroads charged their customers based upon the weight of goods shipped. After a car was loaded, the railroad moved the car to a railroad . . . — Map (db m53750) HM
Pennsylvania (Blair County), Altoona — The Altoona Works
You are standing at the center of what was once the greatest railroad shop complex in the world - the Altoona Works of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Established in 1850 along with the town of Altoona, the railroad shops eventually sprawled across . . . — Map (db m53725) HM
Pennsylvania (Blair County), Altoona — The Master Mechanic
Built in 1882, this Master Mechanics Building housed then, as it does again today, stories of what made the Pennsylvania the most important railroad in America and a cornerstone of the industry. First-Rate Mechanics Each Pennsy operating . . . — Map (db m52604) HM
Pennsylvania (Blair County), Altoona — The Posy Gang
"The Pennsy wanted to make the track areas and stations look good. They gave out prizes to different sections for beauty and upkeep." - Lou Johnston, Posy Gang member A Hint of Nature in a Mechanical World Among the hundreds of jobs on . . . — Map (db m53728) HM
Pennsylvania (Cambria County), Altoona — Horseshoe CurveNational Historic Engineering Landmark
Designed and built under the direction [of] Pennsylvania Railroad chief engineer and, later, company president, J. Edgar Thomson. Horseshoe Curve opened February 15, 1854. It was 366 meters across and 1310 meters long with a 1.8 percent grade. . . . — Map (db m52488) HM
Pennsylvania (Cambria County), Altoona — Horseshoe Curve
has been placed on the National Register of Historic Railroad Landmarks 1854 - 2004 The first railroad to cross the Allegheny Mountains between Harrisburg and Pittsburgn, with a maximum grade of 1.87%, was engineered by J. Edgar . . . — Map (db m52526) HM
Pennsylvania (Cambria County), Logan — Over the HillHow railroads surmounted the spine of the Alleghenies — between Altoona and Johnstown
This was the original (1850-54) PRR main line. After Horseshoe Curve was opened, this became the Hollidaysburg Branch (now Conrail's Cove Secondary Track). From 1850 to 1854, the original PRR main line extended through what is now Altoona to a . . . — Map (db m52528) HM
Pennsylvania (Dauphin County), Harrisburg — Cumberland Valley Railroad Bridge
The coming of the railroad to Harrisburg in 1836 led to the construction of the first bridges to span the Susquehanna, since the building of the Camelback Bridge in 1817, which planted the seed for what would become the city's trademark of . . . — Map (db m44405) HM
Pennsylvania (Dauphin County), Harrisburg — Harris Switch Tower
By 1929, Harrisburg's growth as a freight and passenger rail hub in the eastern United States necessitated the introduction of new rail interlocking technologies to guide the convergence of high volume locomotive traffic through the city. At that . . . — Map (db m6849) HM
Pennsylvania (Dauphin County), Harrisburg — Old Pennsylvania Railroad Station
Harrisburg grew from its earliest days due to its strategic location as a gateway to western expansion, becoming one of the most important inland centers of U.S. transportation and trade. The development of rail lines along the same routes as the . . . — Map (db m6687) HM
Pennsylvania (Dauphin County), Harrisburg — St. Michael’s Lutheran Church
The evolution of the English and German-speaking Lutheran congregations in Harrisburg resulted in the establishment of a number of churches that has helped to enhance the city's fabric of sacred architecture and history. From the oldest site at . . . — Map (db m6730) HM
Pennsylvania (Westmoreland County), Greensburg — Train Station at GreensburgLincoln Highway
Road versus Rail—The Lincoln Highway stretches from New York City to San Francisco. In Western Pennsylvania, the Highway converges with the Pennsylvania Railroad Main Line at one location: Greenburg. The train station at Greensburg, . . . — Map (db m67362) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Leesylvania State Park — Powells Creek Crossing
Efforts began in 1864, but it wasn’t until July 2, 1872, with the aid of the Pennsylvania Railroad, that this section of rail line opened for service. The crossing at Powell’s Creek was 1,100 feet in length and constructed of heavy timber supplied . . . — Map (db m5251) HM

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