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Amissville, Virginia Historical Markers

 
Campaign of Second Manassas Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, October 31, 2009
Campaign of Second Manassas Marker
Virginia (Culpeper County), Amissville — G-9 — Campaign of Second Manassas
Here Lee and Jackson had their headquarters. Here, August 24, 1862, they formed the plan to attack Pope’s line of supply and bring him to battle before McClellan could join him. — Map (db m23959) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Amissville — Z-124 — Culpeper County / Rappahannock County
Culpeper County. Area 284 square miles. Formed in 1748 from Orange, and named for Lord Culpeper, Governor of Virginia 1680–1683. The battle of Cedar Mountain, 1862, was fought in this county. Rappahannock County. Area 274 square . . . — Map (db m8293) HM
Virginia (Culpeper County), Amissville — C-8 — Stuart's Ride Around Pope
Stuart, starting here with his cavalry on August 22, 1862, rode around Pope's army to Catlett's Station. He destroyed supplies and army material and captured Pope's headquarters wagons. — Map (db m7729) HM
Virginia (Rappahannock County), Amissville — Battle MountainCuster’s Early “Last Stand” — Gettysburg Campaign
(Preface): After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s stunning victory at Chancellorsville in May 1863, he led the Army of Northern Virginia west to the Shenandoah Valley, then north through central Maryland and across the Mason-Dixon Line into . . . — Map (db m50140) HM
Virginia (Rappahannock County), Amissville — C-6 — Campaign of Second Manassas
Here Stonewall Jackson, on his march around Pope’s army by way of Jeffersonton to Bristoe Station, turned north, August 25, 1862. — Map (db m8263) HM
Virginia (Rappahannock County), Amissville — C-61 — Campaign of Second Manassas
Here, J.E.B. Stuart, raiding around Pope’s army, turned northeast, August 22, 1862. He passed through Warrenton and went on to Catlett’s Station, where he captured some of Pope’s wagons, in one of which were found Pope’s order book and uniform. — Map (db m8294) HM
Virginia (Rappahannock County), Amissville — Corbin's CrossroadsStuart's Close Shave
Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River to Virginia and camped at Bunker Hill in the northern Shenandoah Valley after the September 17, 1862, Battle of Antietam. Union Gen. George B. McClellan and the . . . — Map (db m64423) HM
Virginia (Rappahannock County), Amissville — Dangerfield NewbyA Tragic Journey to Harpers Ferry
Dangerfield Newby (ca. 1820-1859), a free mulatto for whose family this crossroads is named, was the first of John Brown’s raiders killed during the attack on Harpers Ferry on October 16, 1859. He was the eldest child of Henry Newby and a slave, . . . — Map (db m50611) HM
Virginia (Rappahannock County), Amissville — Encounter with Lee“Don't You Ever Forget It”
Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee passed through Rappahannock County on four occasions during the Civil War. The first occurred on August 26, 1862, on the march to Manassas, and the second took place in October during the retreat after the Battle of . . . — Map (db m49652) HM
Virginia (Rappahannock County), Amissville — Gaines’s Crossroads“The Animal Must Be Very Slim” — Gettysburg Campaign
(Preface): After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s stunning victory at Chancellorsville in May 1863, he led the Army of Northern Virginia west to the Shenandoah Valley, then north through central Maryland and across the Mason-Dixon Line into . . . — Map (db m49449) HM
Virginia (Rappahannock County), Amissville — Hinson's FordImportant River Crossing on a Historic March
In mid-August 1862, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee concentrated the Army of Northern Virginia on the western bank of the Rappahannock River near Jeffersonton, about 10 miles east of here. Union Gen. John Pope’s Army of Virginia was located on the . . . — Map (db m64421) HM
Virginia (Rappahannock County), Amissville — Twilight of Slavery“Enlightened” Accommodations No Match for Freedom
The three brick cabins in the field before you are tangible connections to the enslaved people of Rappahannock County before and during the Civil War. Many slaves escaped to Union lines here and elsewhere, and some former bondsmen served in the U.S. . . . — Map (db m49451) HM

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