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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Arlington, Virginia Historical Markers

 
Abingdon Marker image, Touch for more information
By Kevin W., June 12, 2008
Abingdon Marker
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Abingdon
Birthplace of Nellie Custis the adopted daughter of General George Washington Original land grant 1669 Purchased by John Parke Custis in 1778 from the Alexanders for whom Alexandria Virginia was named Destroyed by fire in 1930 . . . — Map (db m15867) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Abingdon Plantation
The land that Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport occupies today was once part of Abingdon Plantation. Abingdon was the home of George Washington’s stepson, John Parke Custis, and birthplace of Washington’s beloved granddaughter, Nelly. . . . — Map (db m8381) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Abingdon Plantation Restoration
The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority worked in concert with Federal, state and local historic preservation agencies and professionals in the field to develop the restoration plan for the Abingdon Plantation site. The restoration process . . . — Map (db m8386) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Alcova
The oldest part of this house may date from 1836 when John M. Young, a Washington wheelright and carriage maker, purchased the farm from Thomas Hodges, planted a large orchard and used the place as a summer home. In 1905, the farm was acquired by . . . — Map (db m884) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — American Indian Villages and Captain John Smith
On June 16,1608, Englishman Captain John Smith and fourteen other men from the Jamestown colony entered the Potomac River aboard a two-ton open barge in search of a glistering metal the [natives] told us they had from Patowmeck. They explored . . . — Map (db m19978) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Arlington County War Memorial
Panel 1: WWI: 1917 – 1918 To the memory of those who served in the World War and those who gave their lives. John Lyon, U.S.A. Henry G. Smallwood, U.S.A. Robert G. Bruce, . . . — Map (db m88401) WM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Arlington Post Office
In the first half of the 20th Century, Arlington County changed from a handful of separate neighborhoods to a cohesive community with its own identity and government. The establishment of a central post office was a major factor in this . . . — Map (db m54884) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — ARPANET
The ARPANET, a project of the Advanced Research Projects Agency of the Department of Defense, developed the technology that became the foundation for the internet at this site from 1970 to 1975. Originally intended to support military needs, ARPANET . . . — Map (db m47305) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 26 — Ball's Crossroads
This intersection has been a focal point since about 1740, when two roads were developed, one from the future site to Alexandria to the mouth of Pimmit Run, the other from Awbury’s Ferry (at the site of Rosslyn) to the Falls Church. The first came . . . — Map (db m55969) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 25 — Ballston
By 1900 a well-defined village called Central Ballston had developed in the area bounded by the present Wilson Boulevard, Taylor Street, Washington Boulevard, and Pollard Street. More diffuse settlement extended westward to Lubber Run and southward . . . — Map (db m72026) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 29 — Barcroft
In 1880 Dr. John W. Barcroft rebuilt the Arlington Mill. The name of the railroad station here was subsequently changed from Arlington to Barcroft, and that became the name of the residential community which developed eastward along Columbia Pike. . . . — Map (db m86142) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Barcroft Community House
The Barcroft Community house was constructed in 1908 as a branch chapel of the Methodist church. It was sold in 1914 to the neighborhood civic association, the Barcroft School and Civic League. The building served as the Barcroft neighborhood public . . . — Map (db m56472) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 20 — Battery Garesché
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Battery Garesché Here stood Battery Garesché, constructed late in 1861 to control the higher ground dominating Fort Reynolds, 200 yards to the southeast. It had a perimeter of 166 yards and . . . — Map (db m5164) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Birchwood
Caleb Birch, a farmer and constable, built a log house here around 1800 on land granted to his grandfather, James Robertson, by Lord Fairfax in 1724. The original house burned and was rebuilt about 1836. A second log cabin was added ten years later. . . . — Map (db m56520) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Bluemont Junction
In June 1945 the scene nearby would have included the multiple tracks, gas-electric combine, electric substation, and passenger station shown below. As of 1912 Bluemont Junction served as the hub of the multi-line Washington & Old Dominion Railway. . . . — Map (db m24924) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Bluemont Junction, ca. 1934
(Trail Side): Bluemont Junction began operation in 1912 as a part of the newly formed Washington & Old Dominion (W&OD) Railway. The station was a busy transfer point for passengers and freight from Alexandria and Georgetown to points west, . . . — Map (db m24988) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Brandymore Castle
This landmark was first described in 1724 by surveyor Charles Broadwater as "the rock stones called Brandymore Castle." Research in 1972 established that the natural formation matched the boundary descriptions on the 18th century land grands from . . . — Map (db m8180) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Buckingham
The Buckingham garden apartment complex was built in stages between 1937 and 1983. It represents a pioneering effort to provide rental housing through the use of "garden city" planning principles, mass production techniques and private capital. The . . . — Map (db m56481) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Carlin Community Hall
Since its construction in 1892 as a meeting hall, this building has been in continuous community service. In addition to its use for community meetings, the building also was used for an elementary school, church services, a nursery school, a . . . — Map (db m55375) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Carlin Springs
In 1872 John F. Carlin developed here a popular resort which could be reached by train from Washington and Alexandria. His establishment included two springs, an ice cream parlor, a restaurant, a dance pavilion, and a swimming hole at the confluence . . . — Map (db m56467) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Centennial of Military AviationFort Myer, Virginia — 1908-2008
This plaque commemerates the 100th anniversary of the Wright Brothers flights here at Fort Myer from September 3 to 17, 1908. These flights led to a return series of flights from June 29 to July 30 of 1909 culminating in the first ever cross country . . . — Map (db m70828) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Chain Bridge
In 1797, the merchants of Georgetown built here the first bridge over the Potomac River in order to compete with the Virginia port of Alexandria. The Falls Bridge allowed trade from the "upper country" of Virginia to move directly to Georgetown over . . . — Map (db m3339) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Cherrydale
In 1893 a branch post office at Lee Highway and Pollard Street was named Cherrydale, with reference to Dorsey Donaldson’s large cherry orchard in back of the present firehouse. Quincy Street was then known as Cherry Valley Road. Settlement in this . . . — Map (db m55731) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Cherrydale Masonic Hall
This two-story brick building was built in 1936 as the Cherrydale Masonic Hall. Designed with retail space on the first floor, the building serves as the home of the Cherrydale Masonic Lodge #42. This lodge is the second oldest Masonic organization . . . — Map (db m55810) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Cherrydale Volunteer Firehouse
The Cherrydale Volunteer Fire Department was the first fire company in Arlington County. Formed in 1898 and officially established in 1904, it originally consisted of 10 leather buckets, a ladder, and spirited volunteers. A community fundraising . . . — Map (db m55809) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — C-1 — Clay and Randolph Duel
Although dueling was illegal in Virginia, Secretary of State Henry Clay challenged U.S. Senator John Randolph of Roanoke. Clay called Randolph out to defend his honor after Randolph insulted him in a speech on the Senate floor. Randolph confided to . . . — Map (db m2315) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 23 — Confederate Outpost
In August 1861, while U.S. forces were constructing the Arlington line three miles to the east, the Confederates established a fortified outpost on the high ground about 200 yards west of here, to guard the bridge by which the Georgetown - Falls . . . — Map (db m68764) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Crossman House
George Grant Crossman built this late Victorian vernacular farmhouse in 1892 for his bride Nellie Dodge. Three generations of the Crossman family operated a 60-acre dairy farm on the site until 1949. The Crossman family played a significant role in . . . — Map (db m43540) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Drew School
In 1945 a new segregated elementary school was built for Arlington’s African American population in the Green Valley, now Nauck, neighborhood. It was the only Arlington school to be built in the Art Moderne architectural style. Originally called the . . . — Map (db m69192) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Edmund Douglas Campbell
Campbell Avenue is named in honor of Edmund D. and Elizabeth P. Campbell, whose accomplishments and civic activism set a high standard for all to follow. Edmund Douglas Campbell was born March 12, 1899, in Lexington, Virginia, the son of . . . — Map (db m65032) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Elizabeth Pfohl Campbell
Campbell Avenue is named in honor of Edmund D. and Elizabeth P. Campbell, whose accomplishments and civic activism set a high standard for all to follow. Margaret Elizabeth Pfohl was born December 4, 1902, in Clemmons, North Carolina. . . . — Map (db m65033) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fairlington
Designed in the Colonial revival style by Kenneth Franzheim and Alan B. Mills and constructed between 1942 and 1944, Fairlington is an early example of successful community planning and large-scale publicly financed rental housing built for defense . . . — Map (db m66728) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort Albany
Immediately to the northwest stood Fort Albany, a bastioned earthwork built in May 1861 to command the approach to the Long Bridge by way of the Columbia Turnpike. It had a perimeter of 429 yards and emplacements for 12 guns. Even after Forts . . . — Map (db m5258) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 18 — Fort Barnard
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Barnard Here stood Fort Barnard, a redoubt constructed late in 1861 to command the approaches to Alexandria by way of Four Mile Run and Glebe Road. It was named for General J. G. Barnard, . . . — Map (db m5158) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 1 — Fort Bennett
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Bennett Here stood Fort Bennett, a small outwork of Fort Corcoran, constructed in May 1861. With a perimeter of 146 yards and emplacements for 5 guns, it was designed to bring under fire the . . . — Map (db m5104) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 17 — Fort Berry
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Berry Immediately to the west stood Fort Berry, a redoubt constructed in 1863 at the north flank of the defenses of Alexandria, but also flanking the Columbia Turnpike and the Arlington Line . . . — Map (db m5154) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort C.F. SmithDefending the Capital
Fort C.F. Smith was constructed in early 1863 as part of the expansion and strengthening of the capital’s defenses that continued throughout the Civil War. With Forts Strong, Morton and Woodbury, Fort C.F. Smith formed the outer perimeter of the . . . — Map (db m5099) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort C.F. SmithMr. Lincoln’s Forts — Defenses of Washington, 1861-1865
Fort C.F. Smith was constructed in 1863 on farmland appropriated from William Jewell. The fort was named in honor of Gen. Charles Ferguson Smith, who was instrumental in the Union victory at Fort Donelson, Tennessee in 1862. The fortification was . . . — Map (db m5101) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort C.F. SmithProtecting the Capital
The ramps in front of you, now covered with grass, led to wooden platforms on which the various cannons were placed. When built in 1863, Fort C.F. Smith had platforms for twenty-two artillery pieces and four siege mortars. However, only sixteen . . . — Map (db m5102) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 8 — Fort C.F. Smith
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort C.F. Smith Just to the north are the remains of Fort C.F. Smith. A lunette built early in 1863 to command the high ground north of Spout Run and protect the flank of the Arlington Line. It . . . — Map (db m5103) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 13 — Fort Cass
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Cass During the Civil War, the Union built a series of forts to defend Washington, D.C. By 1865 there were 33 earthen fortifications in the Arlington Line. Fort Cass (1861) was part of this . . . — Map (db m5141) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 2 — Fort Corcoran
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Corcoran During the Civil War, the Union built a series of forts to defend Washington, D.C. By 1865 there were 33 earthen fortifications in the Arlington Line. Fort Corcoran (1861) was part . . . — Map (db m5106) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 15 — Fort Craig
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Craig Here stood Fort Craig, a lunette in the Arlington Line constructed in August 1861. It had a perimeter of 324 yards and emplacements for 11 guns. — Map (db m5150) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 7 — Fort Ethan Allen
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Ethan Allen This embankment was the south face of Fort Ethan Allen, a bastioned earthwork built in September 1861 to command all the approaches to Chain Bridge south of Pimmit Run. The fort . . . — Map (db m2317) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort Ethan AllenMr. Lincoln’s Forts — Defenses of Washington - 1861-1865
Fort Ethan Allen was constructed during the Civil War to provide one of the last lines of defense against possible Confederate attacks aimed at Washington. The fort commanded approaches to Chain Bridge (over the Potomac River) from the south of . . . — Map (db m2318) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 3 — Fort Haggerty
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Haggerty Here beside the Georgetown-Alexandria road stood Fort Haggerty, a small outwork of Fort Corcoran, constructed in May 1861. With a perimeter of 128 yards and emplacements for 4 guns, . . . — Map (db m5111) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 19 — Fort Reynolds
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Reynolds Here stood Fort Reynolds, a redoubt constructed in September, 1861, to command the approach to Alexandria by way of the valley of Four Mile Run. It had a perimeter of 360 yards and . . . — Map (db m5155) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 16 — Fort Richardson
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Richardson Here is what is left of Fort Richardson, a detached redoubt constructed in September, 1861, to cover the left flank of the newly built Arlington defense line, It was named for . . . — Map (db m39726) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 5 — Fort Runyon
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Runyon A half-mile to the southwest stood Fort Runyon, a large bastioned earthwork constructed in May 1861 to protect the Long Bridge over the Potomac. Its perimeter, 1484 yards, was about . . . — Map (db m5255) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 6 — Fort Scott
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Scott Here stood a detached lunette constructed in May, 1861, to guard the south flank of the defenses of Washington and named for General Winfield Scott, then General-in-Chief of the Army. . . . — Map (db m5257) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 9 — Fort Strong
. . . — Map (db m5112) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 14 — Fort Tillinghast
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Tillinghast Here stood Fort Tillinghast, a lunette in the Arlington Line constructed in August 1861. It had a perimeter of 298 yards and emplacements for 13 guns. A model of this fort, . . . — Map (db m5147) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 12 — Fort Whipple
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Whipple On the high ground to the northeast stood Fort Whipple, a bastioned earthwork built early in 1863 to support the Arlington Line built in 1861. It had a perimeter of 640 yards and . . . — Map (db m5140) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 11 — Fort Woodbury
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Woodbury During the Civil War, the Union built a series of forts to defend Washington, D.C. By 1865 there were 33 earthen fortifications in the Arlington Line. Fort Woodbury (1861) was part . . . — Map (db m5138) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Freedman’s VillageA New Home for African Americans
During the Civil War, many escaped and freed slaves traveled north seeking refuge in Union camps. Thousands crowded into the Federal City. The number of refugees quickly overwhelmed the area’s resources. Overcrowding and disease became prevalent. In . . . — Map (db m5293) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Freedman's Village
After the outbreak of the Civil War, escaped slaves sought refuge at Union Camps and thousands crowded into the Federal City. In response to the unhealthy conditions in Washington, the government selected a site on Arlington Heights in May, 1863, to . . . — Map (db m6409) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — George Nicholas Saegmuller1847-1934
Saegmuller, a native of Germany, came to America at 23 and achieved success as an inventor and manufacturer of scientific instruments. He lived here at Reserve Hill, the home of his parents-in-law, the Vandenbergs, and contributed in many ways to . . . — Map (db m56519) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Glencarlyn StationThe Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park
If you arrived here by train on a summer Sunday afternoon in the 1870s, you would find crowds of people enjoying Arlington's premier amusement park. This wooded spot near the confluence of Lubber Run and Four Mile Run was a natural place for a . . . — Map (db m67491) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Granite Acroterion1926
This acroterion originally decorated the pediment over the main entrance of the Abbey Mausoleum, which overlooked Arlington National Cemetery. Built in 1926 by the United States Mausoleum Company, the Romanesque-style building featured an impressive . . . — Map (db m66941) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Harry W. Gray House
Harry W. Gray was born into slavery at Arlington House, where he learned to work with brick and stone. He built this two-story red brick townhouse in 1881 on an original ten acre homestead. The design was based on homes he had seen in Washington, . . . — Map (db m69188) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — History Of The U. S. Marine Corps
Marines have been fighting and dying in defense of freedom since the United States Marine Corps inception in November, 1775. The names of principal campaigns engraved on the memorial are a testament to the sacrifices Marines have made in their . . . — Map (db m4917) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Hunter's Crossroads
One of the routes at this historic intersection is Glebe Road, developed in the 18-th century to connect Alexandria with northern Arlington. Columbian Turnpike was built in 1808 between the Long Bridge to Washington and the Little River Turnpike at . . . — Map (db m59705) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — John Ball House
In 1742, John Ball received a 166-acre land grant from Lord Fairfax and became one of the first settlers in this area. The oldest portion of the present house is a one-story 18th century log cabin that was probably built by John Ball. In 1772, six . . . — Map (db m55374) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — John Saegmuller House
This Prairie style house was built around 1926 for John Leonard Saegmuller. The prominent local family owned about 240 acres of land in this part of the county. John worked for his father George Nicholas designing optical instruments at his factory, . . . — Map (db m57639) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Lacey Car Barn
In 1896, the Washington, Arlington & Falls Church Railway began running electric trolleys from Rosslyn to Falls Church on the present routes of Fairfax Drive and I-66. By 1907, the line linked downtown Washington to Ballston, Vienna, and the Town of . . . — Map (db m64845) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Let Freedom Ring
Following World War II, the idea for a symbolic gift from "The People of the Netherlands to The People of the United States" met with generous response from all sections of the Netherlands. Queen Juliana presented a small silver bell to President . . . — Map (db m4899) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Little Falls Road
Little Falls Road was originally a trail from the Indian villages at the head of Four Mile Run to the Potomac River fisheries just below the Little Falls. Later it was developed as a wagon road from the settlement at the Falls Church to Thomas Lee’s . . . — Map (db m55811) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Macedonia Baptist Church
Macedonia Baptist Church was the first African-American church established by residents in the Nauck community. Founded in 1911, the church traces its origins to prayer meetings held in 1908 at the home of Bonder and Amanda Johnson at 22nd Street . . . — Map (db m69190) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Making A Memorial
The United States Marine Corps War Memorial stands as a symbol of our nation's high regard for the honored dead of the Marine Corps. Although the statue depicts one of the most famous events of World War II, the memorial is dedicated to all Marines . . . — Map (db m4902) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — C-72 — Margaret Elizabeth Pfohl Campbell(1902-2004)
Margaret Elizabeth Pfohl Campbell was born to a Moravian family in North Carolina, where her upbringing and education led her to devote her life to seeking educational opportunities for others. She served as dean of Staunton's Mary Baldwin College . . . — Map (db m55736) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Mary Carlin House
This home incorporates the original log house built about 1800 by William Carlin. It is one of the earliest structures remaining in Arlington. At one time, Carlin had been a tailor in Alexandria whose clients included George Washington. Mr. Carlin’s . . . — Map (db m56352) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Maury School
The Clarendon Elementary School was built in 1910 to serve the growing Clarendon neighborhood. The two-story symmetrical building was designed with a central hall and four classrooms on each floor. The school was renamed in 1925 to honor Matthew . . . — Map (db m49434) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Maywood
Railroad and trolley lines stimulated the development of many Arlington neighborhoods in the early 20th century. In 1906 the Great Falls and Old Dominion Railway opened a line through this area. From 1909 to 1913 the Conservative Realty Corporation . . . — Map (db m64883) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Minor's Hill
To the northwest is Minor's Hill, so called for George Minor who lived on the far side at the time of the Revolution. It is the highest elevation in the county. In the fall of 1861, it was the site of a Confederate outpost. Afterwards there was a . . . — Map (db m24992) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Moses Ball Grant
Moses Ball (1717-1792), the ancestor of generations of prominent Arlingtonians, received a 91-acre grant on this land from Lord Fairfax in 1748. The property remained in the Ball Family until 1818. It is thought that Ball built his home on a rise . . . — Map (db m56091) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Mt. Olivet Methodist Church
This is Arlington’s oldest church site in continuous use. Land for a Methodist Protestant Meeting House was conveyed in 1855 by William and Ann Marcey and John B. and Cornetia Brown, for whom Brown’s Bend Road (now 16th Street, North) was named. The . . . — Map (db m56225) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Mt. Zion Baptist ChurchEstablished 1866
As soon as the smoking guns of the Civil War were finally silenced, a group of former slaves banded themselves together in what was then known as Freedmen’s Village, a government reservation in the area of Arlington National Cemetery, and founded a . . . — Map (db m69189) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Nauck: A Neighborhood History
The Nauck community has a long and diverse history. The area that now comprises the Nauck neighborhood was originally granted to John Todd and Evan Thomas in 1719. The land was later acquired by Robert Alexander and sold to John Parke Custis in . . . — Map (db m2504) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Navy and Marine MemorialDedicated to Americans Lost at Sea
In war and in peace, in commerce and in travel, in rescue and discovery, in fisheries and in research, this nation has forged a bond with and a dependence on the sea. This monument of waves and gulls memorializes our national life at sea. It is . . . — Map (db m5108) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Old Ball Family Burial Ground
This is one of Arlington’s oldest family burial grounds. Ensign John Ball (1748- 1814), a veteran of the American Revolution (Sixth Virginia Infantry), is buried here. John Ball was the son of Moses Ball, who was one of the pioneer settlers in the . . . — Map (db m56482) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Original Federal Boundary Stone NW 1
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed-1791-1792 Protected by Richard Arnold Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916 — Map (db m88153) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 5
Original Federal Boundary Stone 1921 - 1952 District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Keystone Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution — Map (db m73024) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 7
In 1801, this stone represented Arlington's limits. In 2001, this school represents Arlington's boundless horizon. Arlington County Virginia Bicentennial 1801-2001 200 Years of Community — Map (db m88156) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Original West Corner Stone
Original West Corner Stone District of Columbia 1791 - 1792 Dedication 1952 Rededication 1989 Falls Church Chapter, NSDAR — Map (db m72939) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — C-7 — Orville Wright’s First Virginia Flight
Orville Wright made his first heavier-than air flight in Virginia at Fort Myer for the U.S. Army on 3 Sept. 1908. He flew the plane slightly more than a minute, reaching a speed of 40 miles per hour. During the next two weeks here, Wright broke . . . — Map (db m108126) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Peck Chevrolet
Bob Peck opened his first Chevrolet dealership in 1939 on Wilson Boulevard in Clarendon. In 1964, he moved the dealership west to Ballston to the very prominent corner of North Glebe Road and Wilson Boulevard, 300 feet south of this marker. Taking . . . — Map (db m64844) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Pentagon Memorial
[Panel 1]: We claim this ground in remembrance of the events of September 11, 2001. To honor the 184 people whose lives were lost, their families, and all who sacrifice that we may live in freedom. We will never forget. . . . — Map (db m13109) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Pimmit Run and Chain Bridge
Pimmit Run is a stream that runs from the Pimmit Hills neighborhood in Falls Church and joins the Potomac River immediately south of Chain Bridge. The mouth of Pimmit Run provided Native Americans and settlers access to fresh water and fishing, the . . . — Map (db m59708) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 31 — Prospect Hill
The mansion which formerly stood here was built in 1841 by James Roach, a prosperous contractor who supplied most of the brick and stone used in the construction of the Aqueduct Bridge and Alexandria Canal (under construction 1833-1843) and the . . . — Map (db m55970) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Purple Heart MemorialWounded Combat Veterans — 1782 Military Order of the Purple Heart 1932
. . . — Map (db m82494) WM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Ronald Reagan
The statue of Ronald Wilson Reagan, 40th President of the United States from 1981-1989, is located northeast of this location at the driving entrance to Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. In 1987, President Reagan's Secretary of . . . — Map (db m70983) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Rosslyn
Rosslyn traditionally has served as a principal gateway to Arlington and to Virginia. Captain John Smith explored this area in 1608. Awbrey's Ferry carried travelers across the Potomac for more than a century in the 1700s and 1800s. The Aqueduct . . . — Map (db m82493) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Rosslyn Station
If you were a passenger on the Washington & Old Dominion Railway heading into Georgetown, you would first have to pass through Rosslyn, Virginia, a 15-minute train ride from here. The first Rosslyn Terminal dated from 1906, with the establishment . . . — Map (db m24926) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Site of Arlington Chapel
Arlington's first house of worship, the Chapel of Ease of Arlington Plantation, was near this location. George Washington Parke Custis built it about 1825 for his family, neighbors, and servants. Services were conducted by students from the . . . — Map (db m30008) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Southern-Shreve Cemetery
Five generations of the Southern, Shreve, and related families are interred in this burial plot. The Shreve family in Arlington dates from the arrival of Samuel Shreve from New Jersey about 1780. Shreve purchased a tract of land near Ballston in . . . — Map (db m64878) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Southwest No. 6 Boundary Marker
The U.S. Government erected 40 sandstone markers on the boundaries of the District of Columbia in 1791 and 1792. The boundary survey was initiated by President George Washington and executed by Andrew Ellicott, who became Surveyor General of the . . . — Map (db m66927) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Southwest No. 8 Boundary Marker
The U.S. Government erected 40 sandstone markers on the boundaries of the District of Columbia in 1791 and 1792. The boundary survey was initiated by President George Washington and executed by Andrew Ellicott, who became Surveyor General of the . . . — Map (db m57120) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Stratford Junior High School
On February 2, 1959, Stratford Jr. High became the first racially integrated school in Virginia. The long battle to integrate Virginia's public schools followed the U.S. Supreme Court's 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education, which held that . . . — Map (db m55729) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — SW No. 9 Mile Marker
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia 1791 Protected by Falls Church Chapter, NSDAR Dedication 1916   Rededication 1989 — Map (db m72996) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Symbol of Friendship
Dedicated on May 5, 1960, the 15th anniversary of the liberation of the Netherlands, the Netherlands Carillon was presented "From The People Of The Netherlands To The People Of The United States" in gratitude for assistance given during and after . . . — Map (db m4898) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Ages of AbingdonAbingdon Plantation
The land that Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport occupies today was once part of a plantation. This hill and the ruins on it are all that remain of the house that stood here for nearly 190 years. Abington, as this tract of land on the . . . — Map (db m8377) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Alexander FamilyAbingdon Plantation
Abingdon Plantation was originally part of a 6,000 acre tract if land granted to Robert Howson in 1669. As master of a sailing ship, he was given the land in exchange for transporting settlers to the colony of Virginia. Howson sold it to John . . . — Map (db m8378) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 10 — The Arlington Line
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 The Arlington Line Here the Arlington Line constructed in August, 1861, crossed the Georgetown-Falls Church road. 100 yards to the northwest stood Fort Morton, a lunette with a perimeter of 250 . . . — Map (db m5161) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 28 — The Arlington Mill
The land along Four Mile Run in this area belonged to George Washington and was known as Washington Forest. Later it became part of the Arlington estate. The Columbia Turnpike was built through here in 1808 to link the Long Bridge at Washington with . . . — Map (db m56468) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Ball-Carlin Cemetery
Here between 1766 and 1908 were buried members of the Ball and Carlin families. In 1742 John Ball was granted 166 acres in this area and in 1748 his brother Moses Ball was granted 91 adjoining acres, now the site of Doctor’s Hospital. They were . . . — Map (db m55376) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Battle For Iwo Jima
Iwo Jima's location midway between Japan and American bomber bases in the Mariana Islands was key to both countries strategies. Since the summer of 1944, American long-range B-29 bombers had been flying 2,700 miles to strike the Japanese Home . . . — Map (db m4916) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Boundary Channel
England's King Charles I granted the entire Potomac River to Maryland in 1632. Four centuries later Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia were still arguing over their mutual boundary. Alexander's Island was one controversial site. It . . . — Map (db m98717) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Custis FamilyAbingdon Plantation
John Parke Custis was the adopted stepson of George Washington and had been raised at the nearby Washington estate of Mount Vernon. He and his wife, Eleanor Calvert, lived in New Kent County with their first two daughters. However, Custis wanted to . . . — Map (db m8380) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Dawson-Bailey House
This house is probably the oldest structure in Arlington County, but its exact age is unknown. This land was first patented in 1696; a house at this site is shown on a survey of 1785. Thomas Dawson enlarged the present house by adding the east end . . . — Map (db m56258) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Flag Raisings
On the morning of February 23, 1945, the fifth day of battle, a 40-man Marine combat patrol ascended the rocky slopes of Mount Suribachi, a 550-foot extinct volcano at the southern tip of Iwo Jima. The patrol, led by First Lieutenant Harold G. . . . — Map (db m4903) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Glebe of Fairfax Parish
The glebe was a 500-acre farm provided for the rector of Fairfax Parish, which included both Christ Church, Alexandria, and the Falls Church. The Glebe House, built in 1775, stood here. It burned in 1808 and was rebuilt in 1820, as a hunting lodge; . . . — Map (db m57022) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Great Falls Line
The Bluemont Branch of the Washington & Old Dominion was not the railroad’s only line. The Great Falls & Old Dominion Railroad arose in 1906 from the vision of two prominent men. Sen. Stephen B. Elkins of West Virginia had prospered through coal, . . . — Map (db m24925) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Hunter FamilyAbingdon Plantation
After the Stuarts moved from Abingdon in 1793, the Alexander family once again owned the plantation. Robert Alexander III’s son, Walter, leased Abingdon to several families over the years. In 1807, he advertised the Abingdon estate for sale, ending . . . — Map (db m8379) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Industrial AgeAbingdon Plantation
During the late 1800s and early 1900s, the encroachment of industry transformed the landscape of Abingdon. Several brick companies purchased the land and began to manufacture brick on the site. Various modes of transportation converged on . . . — Map (db m8385) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Mouth of Pimmit Run
Thomas Lee patented land in this area in 1719. Here at the head of navigation of the Potomac River, he established an official tobacco inspection warehouse in 1742, the beginning of Arlington's first industrial complex. After 1794, Philip Richard . . . — Map (db m3337) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Tracks Into HistoryThe Washington & Old Dominion Railroad
Time Line March 20, 1847 - Incorporated as the Alexandria & Harper’s Ferry Railroad. March 15, 1853 - The corporate name changes to the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad Company. February 25, 1855 - Construction . . . — Map (db m2500) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Tracks into HistoryThe Washington & Old Dominion Railroad
The railroad that became the Washington & Old Dominion was born in Alexandria in response to the competition in shipping posed by the port in Baltimore, which was served by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The B&O was diverting farm produce from the . . . — Map (db m24920) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Transportation
Near this point the Alexandria Canal crossed Four Mile Run, connecting Alexandria docks and railyards to Georgetown and western Maryland from 1843 to 1886. To the east were the turnpike and railroad. In 1896 the Washington, Alexandria and Mount . . . — Map (db m22469) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Travers Family Graveyard
John N. and Elizabeth Causins Travers established a 30-acre farm here in 1832, when Arlington was rural and had less than 1,500 inhabitants. Over the years the land was subdivided. Descendants and kin lived here, contributing to the life of . . . — Map (db m49800) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — United States Marine Corps War Memorial
Dedicated to the Marine dead of all wars, and their comrades of other services who fell fighting beside them. Created by Felix de Weldon, and inspired by the immortal photograph taken by Joseph J. Rosenthal on February 23, 1945, atop Mt. . . . — Map (db m4914) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Walker Chapel
Walker Chapel, a small frame country church of the Mount Olivet Circuit, was dedicated at this location on July 18, 1876. It was named in honor of the Walker family who donated the Walker Grave Yard as the site for the church. A new frame church was . . . — Map (db m2316) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Washington and Old Dominion Trail
W & OD Trail. The 100-foot-wide Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park (W&OD Trail) features a 45-mile asphalt trail for walking, running, skating, bicycling and other activities and a 33-mile parallel, gravel bridle path for . . . — Map (db m2406) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Washington's Survey Marker
Although it is no longer legible, this monument marks the northernmost point of an approximately 1200-acre tract of land that George Washington purchased in 1775 prior to the American Revolution. Washington used an oak tree that stood on this site . . . — Map (db m56480) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Watergate Investigation
Mark Felt, second in command at the FBI, met Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward here in this parking garage to discuss the Watergate scandal. Felt provided Woodward information that exposed the Nixon Administration’s obstruction of the FBI's . . . — Map (db m55498) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Welburn Square
This park is named for Dr. Williamson Crothers Welburn, 1874-1964, an Arlington physician whose practice began in 1905. Welburn built his office on this site with a pharmacy/post office downstairs and living space above. The front sidewalk was the . . . — Map (db m56475) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — C-2 — World’s First Public Passenger Flight
On September 9, 1908, near this site, Orville Wright carried aloft in public his first passenger, Lt. Frank P. Lahm, for a flight lasting 6 minutes and 24 seconds. Three days later, he took Major George O. Squier on a flight of 9 minutes and . . . — Map (db m108151) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Wright Park
This park is named for Henry Wright, born in 1878 in Lawrence, Kansas, and raised in a Quaker family. Wright's exposure to functional Quaker architecture and his father's position as a local city planner impacted his designs. He studied architecture . . . — Map (db m69554) HM
Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 33 — Wunder's Crossroads
For more than half a century from the mid-1800’s the intersection of Lee Highway and Glebe Road was known as Wunders Crossroads after the family whose farm lay just northeast. Dr. Henry S. Wunder and his son George O. Wunder were leading citizens of . . . — Map (db m56255) HM

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