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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Bristow, Virginia Historical Markers

 
Two Markers on Bristow Road image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2006
Two Markers on Bristow Road
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — G-20 — Battle of Bristoe Station
In the autumn of 1863, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, with Lt. Gen. A. P. Hill’s III Corps in the lead, pursued Maj. Gen. George G. Meade’s Union army as it withdrew towards Washington. On the afternoon of 14 October, Maj. Gen. . . . — Map (db m782) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — 41 — Brentsville
Fourth seat of the Prince William County government. Courthouse, jail, Episcopal Chapel, and White House were built in 1822 on land originally part of the Brent Town tract confiscated from Robert Bristow, a Tory, in 1779. ♦ St. James Church . . . — Map (db m780) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationBristoe 1861-1862 Trail
Welcome to Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park. The park interprets three important Civil war events that took place around Bristoe Station. This trail focuses on the fall 1861 Confederate encampment known as “Camp Jones” and the . . . — Map (db m59032) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationRoads to Bristoe Station
In June of 1862, fighting in Virginia was focused around the Confederate Capital in Richmond. In a series of battles known as the Seven Days Campaign, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee beat back Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan’s Federal Army of the . . . — Map (db m59036) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationCamp Jones
From August through November of 1861, thousands of Confederate soldiers filled the acres surrounding Bristoe Station. These men belonged to the brigades of Brig. Gens. Henry Whiting and Cadmus Wilcox. This encampment was named Camp Jones after Col. . . . — Map (db m59038) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationConfederates in Bristoe
On the afternoon of August 26, 1862, about 350 yards ahead, you would have witnessed a long line of freight trains containing dusty Federal infantrymen passing from the marshalling yards of Alexandria (to your left) on their way to the Federal camps . . . — Map (db m59301) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationPreparing for Battle
As dawn broke on August 27, 1862, Stonewall Jackson moved two of his divisions up the railroad to the main Federal supply depot at Manassas Junction, leaving three brigades of Maj. Gen. Richard S. Ewell’s Division as a rear guard at Bristoe. Ewell’s . . . — Map (db m59325) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationBattle Along the Railroad
The devastating crossfire provided by the 60th Georgia to your right on the other side of the railroad tracks had nearly an entire Federal brigade pinned down in this field. The Georgians used the cuts and fills along the railroad as a parapet to . . . — Map (db m59402) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationDeadly Day for Excelsior Brigade
Prior to the action along the railroad, Brig. Gen. Nelson Taylor’s New York brigade, better known as the “Excelsior Brigade” came into the field here. Knowing little of the situation before arriving on the field, Taylor observed the . . . — Map (db m59407) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationThe “Tigers” of Louisiana
In this creek bed, three Louisiana regiments made a stand. These men, many recruited from the wharves of New Orleans, had already established a reputation as hard fighters and were labeled “Tigers” by their comrades. Their brigade . . . — Map (db m59428) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationCemeteries
The area around Bristoe became the final resting place for hundreds of soldiers who died in Northern Virginia. Soldiers from Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia created state cemeteries to bury their comrades. Burial details . . . — Map (db m59485) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationAlabama Cemetery
In 1862, Federal soldiers in the area found as many as 82 men buried here. Here is a list of known burials in this cemetery as of 2012. As many as 41 are still unknown. William P. Adams Jesse Frank Nabors James Barber William Nunnelly J.G. Booker . . . — Map (db m64198) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe Station“We Shall Bag the Whole Crowd”
By 4:30 pm, Ewell saw the approach of Hooker’s two regiments to the north and the withdrawal of the 60th Georgia along the railroad. In the center, Forno’s Louisianans were already slowly pulling back. The arrival of Federal artillery and more . . . — Map (db m68482) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationDavis Family Farmstead
In this vicinity stood the home of Thomas K. Davis and his family. Davis purchased 136 acres in 1858 and by 1861 had built a substantial home, barn and outbuildings here. Davis also operated a store in the village of Bristoe Station at the northwest . . . — Map (db m68483) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park
Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park is one of Prince William County's most treasured open spaces. This peaceful landscape features over 2.7 miles of walking and equestrian trails. Wildlife abounds in the fields, woods and ponds. Evidence of . . . — Map (db m20177) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Confederate Cemeteries
During the late summer of 1861, Confederate troops from Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia camped in the vicinity of Bristoe Station. Typhoid, measles, and other contagious diseases quickly swept through these camps . . . — Map (db m40090) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — E-54 — Road to the Valley
By the first quarter of the 1700s, revisions to the road laws in the colony mandated more convenient travel routes over land. In conjunction with new settlement pushing west through the Piedmont region to the Blue Ridge, a series of old Indian . . . — Map (db m781) HM

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