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Burlington, North Carolina Historical Markers

 
A Legacy of Community Marker image, Touch for more information
By Patrick G. Jordan, June 27, 2010
A Legacy of Community Marker
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — A Legacy of Community
Following the labor turbulence of the 1930s and the strain of the Great Depression, World War II brought relative calm and increased productivity to the mill communities. Immediately after the War, however, mill owners revived a movement that had . . . — Map (db m32846) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — African Americans in the Mill Village
African Americans experienced the textile mill world very differently than white families. Mills did not offer the same work opportunities to black men and women as they did for whites. Life in the mill village was also restricted, and black workers . . . — Map (db m32783) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — After the Whistle Blows
Mill employees worked at tedious jobs for long hours, usually having only Sundays to rest. With responsibilities at home as well as in the mill, free time was limited. Still, mill workers found ways to socialize, relax, and have fun in a world . . . — Map (db m32999) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 82 — Alamance Cotton Mill
Built 1837 by E. M. Holt. Produced Alamance Plaid, the first factory-dyed cotton cloth south of the Potomac. Stood here. — Map (db m28695) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Battle of Alamance
Here was fought (I) on May 16, 1771, the Battle of Alamance. Opposing forces were colonial militia, mainly from the eastern part of the province, commanded by Governor William Tryon, and a band of frontier dwellers known as Regulators, who had risen . . . — Map (db m35055) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Battle of Clapp's Mill
Battle of Clapp's Mill On March 2, 1781, the American light troops under Colonel Otho Holland Williams of Maryland and Lieutenant Colonel Henry "Lighthouse Harry" Lee of Virginia engaged the British light troops near Clapp's Mill on Beaver . . . — Map (db m28062) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Calling the Mill Village 'Home'
Mill owners initially built villages near textile mills to attract families of workers. By 1900, 92% of workers lived in mill-owned housing. A typical mill village in the 1920s consisted of about 350 houses located within walking distance of the . . . — Map (db m32830) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Camp Alamance
At this site on 1 June 1861 soldiers of the 6th NC State Troops, commanded by Col. Charles Fisher president of the NC Railroad, drilled before departing for the war front. In July 1861, they became the first troops ever carried by rail into battle. . . . — Map (db m29626) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Carriage Shed
To the right is the carriage shed. This building is an original building to the site. It was used to store a wagon or other horse drawn equipment. To the left is a blacksmith shop. Even though this building is not original, the blacksmith was . . . — Map (db m34743) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Cedarock Historical Farm
Welcome to Cedarock Historical Farm. The farm was settled in 1830 by John and Polly Garrett. The farm was 115 acres in size (85 improved and 30 unimproved acres). Please enjoy your visit and come back to see us. — Map (db m34720) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Charles Richard Drew1904 - 1950
Charles Richard Drew 1904 - 1950 Black scientist and surgeon Pioneer in the preservation of blood plasma Medical director of the Blood-for-Britain Project, 1940 Director of the first American Red Cross Blood Bank, 1941 . . . — Map (db m31142) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Children in the Mill Village
Early textile mill owners alleviated labor shortages by recruiting entire families for employment. Offering homes as well as jobs, owners created villages of workers from which the mills could draw. Children - sometimes as young as seven - filled . . . — Map (db m32671) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Confederate OccaneechiPiedmont Indians in the Civil War
When North Carolina passed laws in 1833 to restrict the rights of free blacks; they also limited the rights of Indians. In old Orange (later Alamance) County, many Occaneechi Indians including Dixon Corn, Jesse Jeffries, Enoch Jones, and Andrew . . . — Map (db m46084) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Cotton Dust and Poverty
Although industrialization brought great improvements to the South, advancements in health and medicine lagged dramatically behind. Without antibiotics, infectious diseases were common and dangerous. Medical care was often unavailable, and employers . . . — Map (db m33273) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Dentzel Carousel
Burlington Historic Property Circa 1906 - 1910 — Map (db m29238) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 13 — Early Railroads
First public meeting to promote railroads in North Carolina, Aug. 1, 1828, was at Wm. Albright's home which stood 4 mi. S.E. — Map (db m30693) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Friendship Academy and High School1879 - 1927
Was located 150 yards north-east of this marker. Built by community effort and without public funds. This school was dedicated to thoroughness in all subjects taught, and to the building of character as fundamental for the growth of the student. . . . — Map (db m75810) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe - Churches
Church congregations were central to social as well as religious life in the village. Mill owners encouraged church membership among their workers and often aided congregations to promote social stability and community morality. The Baptist church, . . . — Map (db m32376) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe - Company Office and Store
Built around 1890 between the factory and the mill houses, the small brick building linked mill production and village life. The mill office was on the left side, with the owner's office behind it. The company store was on the right side. Especially . . . — Map (db m31284) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe - Grist Mill and Dam Site
Like many Piedmont mills, Glencoe was built at an old grist mill site - the Vincent Mill begun in the 1860s. Remains of it may be seen on the "island" side of the mill race. The Vincent Mill had a wooden dam and a mill race about 100 yards long. For . . . — Map (db m31337) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe - Life in the Mill VillageFrom Farm to Factory
The whole matter of providing attractive and comfortable habitations for cotton operatives [is] summarized in the statement that they are essentially a rural people…while their condition is in most cases decidedly bettered by going to the . . . — Map (db m33540) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe - Lodge Hall and Barber Shop
The Lodge Hall, a small frame building, housed many types of gatherings. The Barber Shop, built in the 20th century, served village men and boys. In one period, old-timers recall, a barber would arrive and open the shop to cut hair one evening each . . . — Map (db m32377) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe - Picker House and Dye House
2. Picker House After drivers delivered bales of raw cotton to Glencoe, the first step in transforming it to woven cloth took place in the Picker House. Men unpacked the cotton from the bales and removed such debris as twigs, leaves, and bugs. . . . — Map (db m32475) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe - Power, Wheel House and Turbine
To power the turbine that ran the mill, the water that ran through the mill race flowed into the wheelhouse at the back of the mill. It dropped down through the 48-inch, 152-horsepower turbine located below ground level. A metal shaft connected the . . . — Map (db m32420) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe - The Marshall Family House Site
In 1899 James H. Holt sold Emanual "Man" Marshall a one-acre lot at the northeastern end of the Glencoe property. "Man" Marshall was the superintendent at Glencoe Mills for nearly forty years. He and wife Mary Eliza Murray Marshall lived with their . . . — Map (db m33580) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe - The Mill BuildingsMill Design
Mill designers planned the brick and heavy timber mill to standards of the day. They employed the Italianate style popular for industrial architecture. Its ornate brickwork, arched windows, low roof, and prominate tower suited the functional needs . . . — Map (db m31547) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe - The School
When Glencoe Mill opened in 1880, founder James H. Holt was ahead of most of his contemporaries in requiring that village children attend school for several months a year to the sixth grade, before they could work in the factory. The company built . . . — Map (db m33583) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe - Two-Story Workers' Houses
In Glencoe as in other Alamance County villages, the Holts built many substantial, 2-story houses for the workers. They resembled farmhouses in the area. In most of the 2-story houses, carpenters used hand-sawn timbers put together with pegs. Some . . . — Map (db m33650) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe Management Houses
At Glencoe, there were three levels of management: Owner, Manager, and Superintendent. The location and style of their houses indicated their occupants' status in the hierarchy. The Mill Owner's House, built for Robert Holt, is a large 2-story . . . — Map (db m31504) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe Mill1880 - 82
Incorporated in 1880 by James H. and William E. Holt, sons of textile pioneer E. M. Holt. The last water-powered textile mill developed by the Holts. Produced napped cotton cloth, flannels and woven plaids. Employed as many as 500 workers at its . . . — Map (db m31082) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Glencoe Mill VillageBuilt 1880 - 82
A remarkably complete mill village exemplifying the post-Civil War development of the textile industry along the streams of piedmont North Carolina. Glencoe Mill built nearly 50 houses for its workers. Acquired by Preservation North Carolina in 1997 . . . — Map (db m31291) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 58 — Henry Jerome Stockard
Poet, author of "Fugitive Lines" and other works; lifelong educator; president of Peace Institute, 1907-12. Home stood here. — Map (db m29764) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 126 — J. Spencer Love1896 - 1962
Founder of Burlington Mills, 1924; success of rayon propelled world's largest textile company. "Pioneer Plant" 3/4 mi. S. — Map (db m29949) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — John and Polly Garrett House
It took John and Polly Garrett five years to build this house. During that five year period, they lived in the small log home to your right. The Garrett's moved into this house in 1835. Four years later, Polly gave birth to their first child. They . . . — Map (db m34722) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Johnston Moves WestLogisticians at Work — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface) The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush . . . — Map (db m46046) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Living in a Mill-Centered World
In the village, every aspect of the workers’ lives revolved around the mill. In addition to their homes, the churches, schools, and stores all belonged or were tied to the mill owners. While these places provided much needed social time for mill . . . — Map (db m33320) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — McCray School
McCray School Est. 1915 - 16 One Room School House Alamance Burlington School System — Map (db m31153) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Men in the Mill Village
Transitioning from the farm to an industrialized way of life was especially hard for men. On the farm, men experienced a certain amount of freedom and variety; millwork was often tedious, repetitive, and produced only wages for a day's labor. Men . . . — Map (db m32775) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Neighbors Divided
Industrialization came to the South later than it had in the North. The first generation of mill workers were transplanted farmers who had no tradition of labor unions. The nature of the mill village also made organized labor difficult. The mill . . . — Map (db m33311) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Norfolk & Western Caboose #518654
This Norfolk & Western caboose was given to the City of Burlington by Norfolk Southern Railway in 1993. It is symbolic of the railroad roots of the North Carolina Railroad town of Company Shops (1866) which became Burlington in 1893. The caboose was . . . — Map (db m35022) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 89 — North Carolina Railroad
Company shops built here in 1857 for maintenance and repair of the N.C. Railroad. Closed in 1866. — Map (db m43304) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Occaneechi in the ServicePiedmont Indians in the Civil War
When North Carolina passed laws in 1833 to restrict the rights of free blacks; they also limited the rights of Indians. In old Orange (later Alamance) County, many Occaneechi Indians including Dixon Corn, Jesse Jeffries, Enoch Jones, and Andrew . . . — Map (db m58335) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Original Garrett House
In 1830, John and Polly Garrett constructed this small log home, which is one of the earliest structures in the district. They lived in this house for five years while they were building the large two-story house behind you. This house served as a . . . — Map (db m34724) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Pine Hill Cemetery - Veterans Memorial
(Front):Dedicated to the men and women of Alamance County who served their country in war (East Side): Time will not dim the glory of their deeds (Back): Patriotic sacrifices forever remembered (West Side): . . . — Map (db m31558) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Pioneer PlantBurlington Industries
Burlington Mills was incorporated Nov. 1, 1923. The first plant of that company, later known as Burlington Industries, largest maker of textiles in the world, began operations on this site July 29, 1924. — Map (db m29995) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Pleasant Grove High School1922 - 1971
Side A Pleasant Grove High School was built on this site in 1922 to serve grades 8 - 10 from 5 small schools in the Pleasant Grove township and one from the Faucette township; Mahan, Sidney, King, Squires, and McCray. Brogden Tew was the . . . — Map (db m31151) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Post Office
During the 1870's and 80's, this building served as a community post office. The building has been restored and displays "pigeon holes" which are compartments used to sort the mail. The building on the right is a smoke house. It dates back to . . . — Map (db m34735) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 22 — Pyle's Defeat
A body of Tories, going to join Cornwallis' Army at Hillsborough, was destroyed by a Whig force, Feb. 23, 1781. ¾ mile southwest. — Map (db m28524) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Pyle's DefeatFebruary 1781
Near this location, mounted Loyalists from Chatham and southern Orange counties led by Col. John Pyle, and on their way to join Gen. Cornwallis in Hillsborough, were defeated by units of Gen. Greene's American Army led by Col. Henry "Light Horse . . . — Map (db m34718) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — St. Paul's Lutheran Church
On Colonial Trading Path Travelers used nearby spring Preaching point 1759 Originally called "Graves Church" Church founded circa 1770 Burials from early period in rock enclosed cemetery Recorded burials from 1790 Called "the Chappel" . . . — Map (db m32156) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — The Animals of a Turn of the Century Farm
The animals of a turn of the century farm were very important to the self supporting farmer. We have tried to represent some of the more common animals found on the farm. We presently have sheep, goats, beef cows, dairy cows and a team of mules. The . . . — Map (db m34744) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — The Corn Crib
The corn crib (located on your left) was a special building used for storing corn and other grains. The corn would be picked from the fields and put in there to dry. Once the corn dried, the farmer would separate the kernels from the cob using a . . . — Map (db m34736) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — The John Allen House
Quaker John Allen constructed this log dwelling circa 1780 in nearby Snow Camp. The State of North Carolina moved it here in 1966, restored it, and opened it to the public in 1967 to illustrate colonial life in the backcountry of North Carolina. The . . . — Map (db m42253) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — The Regulators' FieldA Lesson for the Defeated — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began of February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush . . . — Map (db m42335) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — The Rise of the Textile Mill Communities
In the decades following the Civil War, the textile industry thrust the South into a period of rapid industrialization. In North Carolina, construction of railroads began through Piedmont “backcountry,” and cities sprung up in their . . . — Map (db m33535) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 33 — Trading Path
Colonial trading route, dating from 17th century, from Petersburg, Virginia, to Catawba and Waxhaw Indians in Carolina, passed nearby. — Map (db m28700) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 60 — Tryon’s Camp
Before and after the battle of Alamance, the militia of Governor William Tryon camped nearby, along Alamance Creek, May 13-19, 1771. — Map (db m37373) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 60 — Tryon's Camp
Before and after the Battle of Alamance, the Militia of the Governor William Tryon camped nearby, along Alamance Creek. May 13-19, 1771. — Map (db m28526) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Union Ridge Church1815
Since before 1776 religious services have been held on this site. In 1815 several residents here bought property, organized a church and began holding regular services open to all. The new church soon joined with the Christian denomination of the . . . — Map (db m89309) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Women in the Mill Village
The first waves of migration off the farms were primarily single women and widows. Since these women had limited access to land, they were eager to take the steady work and housing the textile mills provided. An example of this was Bynum, North . . . — Map (db m32792) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Working the Shift
Turning raw cotton into cloth was a multi-step process. As a result, textile mills had different jobs all along the production chain. In the opening room, men unfastened cotton bales and loaded them into cleaning and fluffing machines. From there . . . — Map (db m32834) HM

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