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Chancellorsville, Virginia Historical Markers

 
Back Face of Monument image, Touch for more information
By Craig Swain, February 16, 2008
Back Face of Monument
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — 154th New York State Volunteer Infantry
(front): 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 11th Corps "The Hardtack Regiment" Anchor of the Buschbeck Line Near Dowdall's Tavern Battle of Chancellorsville May 2, 1863 (back): 590 present for duty 240 killed, wounded, and captured Dedicated . . . — Map (db m5460) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — A Bold Plan
Here, on the evening of May 1, 1863, Generals Robert E. Lee and "Stonewall" Jackson hatched one of the boldest schemes in military history. Hunched over maps beside a small fire, the two generals plotted how to destroy the Union army, now entrenched . . . — Map (db m3579) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — A Fatal Reconnaissance
When "Stonewall" Jackson reached this point at about 9 p.m. on May 2, 1863, he stood at the peak of his military career. Four hundred yards in front of you, a shaken Union army hastily built earthworks to halt the Confederate tide. One hundred yards . . . — Map (db m3980) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — A Midnight Conference
After being driven from the Chancellorsville crossroads by Lee on May 3, 1863, Hooker retreated to a new line of defenses covering U.S. Ford, 3.5 miles to your rear. For two days, Hooker strengthened his defenses and awaited attack. Lee took . . . — Map (db m12857) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — A Missed OpportunityThe Battle of Chancellorsville
The morning of May 3d found the Confederate army heavily outnumbered and dangerously divided. "Stonewall" Jackson's flank attack the evening before had staggered the Union army but had not irretrievably damaged it. As the day broke, Jackson's corps, . . . — Map (db m19165) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — A Very Hot Place
At Hazel Grove, Lee's artillerists enjoyed perhaps their greatest success of the war. No sooner had the Union army evacuated the ridge than Southern cannon appeared - first four pieces, then eight, twelve, sixteen. Within an hour more than thirty . . . — Map (db m3618) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — About a mile in the distance...
About a mile in the distance, beyond the vista cut through the trees, you can see modern buildings on high ground which at the time of the battle of Chancellorsville was called Hazel Grove. When "Stonewall" Jackson began his famous flank march early . . . — Map (db m3583) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Apex of Hooker’s Last Line
Earthworks to your right rear mark the apex of Hooker's last line of defense. The Federals retreated to this position late in the morning of May 3, guarding the roads to Ely's and United States Fords. The defensive minded Union commander sat . . . — Map (db m3695) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Artillery Duel
On the morning of May 3, 1863, Union artillery at Fairview suffered the most intense artillery bombardment of the battle. More than 40 Confederate guns at Hazel Grove (visible 1,200 yards in front of you) concentrated their fire on 34 Union cannon . . . — Map (db m3638) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — J-40 — Battle of Chancellorsville
Hooker reached this point, April 30, 1863; Next day he entrenched, with his left wing on the river and his right wing on this road several miles west. That wing was surprised by Jackson and driven back here, May 2. The Confederates stormed the . . . — Map (db m3511) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Battle of Chancellorsville
On May 2-3, 1863, the Army of Northern Virginia under Lee defeated the Army of the Potomac under Hooker on this field. “Stonewall” Jackson, Lee’s great lieutenant was mortally wounded in the flank attack on Hooker’s right which resulted . . . — Map (db m14514) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Birthplace of Matthew Fontaine Maury (1806-1873)The Battle of Chancellorsville
This jumble of bricks and stones tucked deep within Spotsylvania's Wilderness marks the birthplace of Matthew Fontaine Maury, the "Pathfinder of the Seas." All but forgotten now, Maury was a legend during his lifetime. While superintendent of the . . . — Map (db m21934) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — BivouacLee and Jackson
Bivouac Lee and Jackson Night of May 1, 1863. — Map (db m3581) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Brig. Gen. E. F. Paxton, C.S.A.
In this vicinity Brig. Gen. E. F. Paxton, C.S.A. Aged 35 years, of Rockbridge County, VA. Was killed on the morning of May 3, 1863 While leading his command, the Stonewall Brigade in the attack on Fairview — Map (db m3607) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellor Cemetery
This is the Chancellor family cemetery. In the first half of the 19th century the Chancellors dominated this section of Spotsylvania County. Fairview was the original family seat, but branches of the family eventually lived at Chancellorsville, . . . — Map (db m3642) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville — The Battle of Chancellorsville
The Civil War had entered its third year, and the Army of the Potomac was again on the march. Led by its new commander, "Fighting Joe" Hooker, the 134,000-man Union juggernaut crossed the Rappahannock River beyond Lee's left flank on April 28, 1863, . . . — Map (db m10703) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — ChancellorsvilleMay 3, 1863
Following “Stonewall Jackson’s” successful flank attack and his subsequent wounding on the night of May 2nd, Lee appointed Major General “Jeb” Stuart to command Jackson’s Corps. Faced with an imminent threat from the . . . — Map (db m79637) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville
In 1816, an innkeeper named George Chancellor announced that his “large and commodious” roadside inn, named Chancellorsville, was open. By the 1860’s the inn had gone out of operation, as central Virginia became a vast battleground. . . . — Map (db m93526) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
April 27-May 6, 1863. Leaving a large detachment under Sedgwick in front of Fredericksburg, Hooker marched a flanking column around and behind the Confederates. Lee then left a small unit to face Sedgwick and advanced westward to meet Hooker. . . . — Map (db m3517) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
Just ahead is the crossing of the Orange Plank Road, a mid-nineteenth century trade route from the mountains to the navigable Rappahannock at Fredericksburg. Loaded wagons had the right-of-way on the planking, which covered half the roadbed. . . . — Map (db m3552) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 1-3, 1863. "Our enemy must either ingloriously fly or come out from behind his entrenchments and give us battle on our own ground, where certain destruction awaits him." With these words, "Fighting Joe" Hooker, on May 1, started toward the rear . . . — Map (db m3559) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 2, 1863. Shortly after noon, Sickles’ Corps advanced from the Union right-center to attack the "retreating" Confederates. Posey's and Wright's brigades, part of Lee's holding line, met the advance. A rear guard from Jackson's marching column . . . — Map (db m3599) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 3, 1863 - Battle cries break the stillness of the dawn as 25,000 Confederate soldiers move up through the dark woods on both sides of the Plank Road to attack the Union position guarding Fairview heights, 800 yards to the east. Leading them in . . . — Map (db m3606) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 2-3, 1863. In this vicinity, holding Hooker's original center, Slocum's Corps curved northwestward (reader's right rear) to form an interior line behind Howard's Corps. When Jackson smashed Howard, Slocum's western line fell also. The rest of . . . — Map (db m3645) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 2-3, 1863. Units of Slocum's Federal XII Corps held this line. Its left extended a little beyond the Orange Plank Road (reader's left) where it connected with the right of Couch's II Corps. A mile to the southeast the Orange Plank Road . . . — Map (db m3646) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
April 10 - May 3, 1863. These Trenches were part of Hooker's original line. On May 2, Couch's II Corps skirmishers, under command of Col. Nelson A. Miles, beat off repeated Confederate attacks launched to draw attention from Jackson's flanking . . . — Map (db m3866) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 2, 1863. Having lost the Furnace, the 23rd Georgia Regiment established a new line here in the bed of the Unfinished Railroad. Other troops reinforced the position. During late afternoon, while Jackson's front lines were hitting the Federal . . . — Map (db m3906) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 2, 1863. Jackson's two leading lines, battling the tangled undergrowth and the retreating Federal XI Corps, became disorganized. In this vicinity, Jackson halted his successful advance and ordered A.P. Hill's Division to the front. While the . . . — Map (db m3954) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 3, 1863. At daylight Hooker ordered the withdrawal of Sickles' troops from this height, called Hazel Grove, key position of Hooker's front after Jackson's flanking movement. Promptly occupying it with Archer's Confederate Brigade, Stuart, now in . . . — Map (db m14681) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 1, 1863, Union troops advancing toward Fredericksburg along this road, the Orange Plank, met the Confederates about a mile to your left and retreated to this point. Hooker, not waiting to be attacked, ordered these troops back to . . . — Map (db m15151) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 3-6, 1863. About noon on May 3, Hooker’s army fell back to a new position covering the roads to Ely’s and United States fords. With the center here, the right of his line rested on the Rapidan and the left on the Rappahannock. On May 4, Hooker’s . . . — Map (db m93538) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Campaign
May 3-6, 1863. The Confederate trench remains crossing the Bullock Road at this point mark a line held by “Stonewall” Jackson’s Corps after the severe fighting of May 3. Jackson’s forces, now commanded by “Jeb” Stuart, held . . . — Map (db m93585) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Clearing
Vicious fighting surged back and forth across this large clearing on the morning of May 3. From here, you can clearly see the two key Union positions; Fairview, to your right front near the brick wall of the Chancellor Cemetery; and the . . . — Map (db m3785) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Chancellorsville Home of Mrs. Sanford Chancellor
In the spring of 1863, Chancellorsville was the home of Mrs. Sanford Chancellor and seven of her children. The old inn hosted a steady flow of Southern military men as soldiers and officers from Lee’s army stopped to pay their compliments to Mrs. . . . — Map (db m93531) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Civil War Earthworks
Federal soldiers of the 12th Corps built these earthworks on May 1, 1863. "Stonewall" Jackson's flank attack the following day placed them in Confederate hands. At about 6:00 a.m. on May 3, North Carolinians under William Dorsey Pender and Georgians . . . — Map (db m5457) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Civilians in the Crossfire
In seventy-two hours the Chancellor family's world was turned upside down. A Union soldier described the Chancellor women on April 30: "Upon the upper porch was quite a bevy of ladies in light, dressy, attractive spring costumes. They were not at . . . — Map (db m3840) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Climactic Struggle
On the morning of May 3, 1863, more than 17,500 men fell killed or wounded in the woods and fields around you - one man shot every second for five hours. Entrenched Union lines in front of you collapsed, and the Confederates surged forward to seize . . . — Map (db m3801) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Collis Zouaves
Erected to mark the line of battle of the 114th Reg't. Pennsylvania Vol's. on the memorable 3rd day of May 1863, where it lost 3 officers and 35 enlisted men killed List of Killed Major Joseph S. Chandler Captain Frank Eliot, Co. F. Lieu't. . . . — Map (db m3639) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Colquitt Turns Tyler’s Flank11:00 A.M.
“I at once saw the enemy outnumbered us, as they were in double lines, and extended beyond our right. I immediately asked for reinforcements, but was informed they could not be furnished. Colonel Webb, who has remained in front for some . . . — Map (db m79639) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Colquitt’s Attack10:00 A.M.
"My brigade was thrown to the left. Forming line of battle parallel to the road. I advanced in face of a severe fire to a line of breastworks from which the enemy had been driven. The contest was sharp and fierce for a few moments. I . . . — Map (db m79638) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Confederate Breakthrough
At about 7:00 a.m. on May 3, a dangerous gap in the Union line opened near the Orange Turnpike, 1/4 mile to your right. Federal troops on your right, led by Hiram Berry, retreated about 1/2 mile and established a new position. The blue-clad soldiers . . . — Map (db m12789) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Confederate Catastrophe
Near this spot around 9:15 p.m. on the night of May 2, 1863, the Confederate cause suffered disaster. As "Stonewall" Jackson and his party returned from their reconnaissance down the Mountain Road, Confederate musketry erupted south of the Plank . . . — Map (db m3978) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — J-38 — Ely’s Ford
On this hill, May 3, 1863, Confederate General "J.E.B." Stuart was notified that General "Stonewall" Jackson had been wounded at Chancellorsville and that he was to take command of Jackson's Corps. Moments before, Stuart had ordered his 1,000 men . . . — Map (db m3473) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Fairview
Just ahead of you stood a story-and-a-half log house known as Fairview. This was originally a Chancellor home, but during the Civil War James Moxley and his family occupied it. Moxley was overseer of Frances Chancellor's 20 slaves. Moxley likely . . . — Map (db m3641) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Fairview
Formerly a Chancellor farmstead, on May 3, 1863, Fairview became a gory landscape. That morning all the energy and violence of the Battle of Chancellorsville focused here - on the fields and woods around a commonplace log house. Here, the contending . . . — Map (db m3643) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Final Meeting, Fateful March
To reach the Union army's right flank, Jackson would have to march his corps twelve miles over narrow, unpaved roads. The general hoped to have his men moving by dawn on May 2, but he got an unusually late start. It was past 7 a.m. before his troops . . . — Map (db m3555) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Flanking of Hays' Brigade
On this ridge, the Union brigade of Brig. Gen. William Hays, supported by artillery, temporarily stopped the Confederate advance across the ground below you. A member of the 12th New Jersey described what happened next: "We were in open sight, . . . — Map (db m12794) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Hazel Grove
On the morning of May 3, this large, open plateau, known as "Hazel Grove," was the key to the Union position. "Stonewall" Jackson's flank attack the evening before had staggered the Union army but had not seriously damaged it. As the new day dawned, . . . — Map (db m3610) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — High Drama, Human Tragedy
The climactic fighting of the Battle of Chancellorsville took place in the woods and fields around Fairview. Here on the morning of May 3, 1863, Union troops struggled to maintain their position long enough to allow General Hooker time to establish . . . — Map (db m3637) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Hooker's Final Bastion
The low earthworks opposite are the apex of the final Union line at Chancellorsville. After suffering defeat in the massive fighting on May 3, Hooker's army started digging. The result: a powerful, U-shaped line six miles long supported by 100 . . . — Map (db m3691) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Jackson
(South Face): On this Spot fell mortally wounded Thomas J. Jackson Lt. Gen. C.S.A. May 2nd 1863 (East Face): There is Jackson standing like a stone wall Bee at Manassas. (North Face): Could I have directed events, I should have chosen for the good . . . — Map (db m3975) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Jackson Monuments
The effort to erect a monument at the site of Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson's mortal wounding began in February 1887, when Fredericksburg newspaper editor Rufus Merchant founded the Stonewall Jackson Monument Association. On June 13, 1888, a crowd of . . . — Map (db m3977) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Jackson on the Move
About 10 a.m. on May 2, 1863, Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's flanking column approached this then-cleared ridge on the Furnace Road. Union infantrymen perched in trees at Hazel Grove, three-quarters of a mile to the northwest, . . . — Map (db m3585) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — J-37 — Jackson’s Amputation
Near here stood the hospital tent to which the wounded "Stonewall" Jackson was brought during the Battle of Chancellorsville. In that tent his left arm was amputated on May 3, 1863. He died seven days later at Guinea. — Map (db m3515) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Jackson's Impact
Around you is tangible and dramatic evidence of the impact "Stonewall" Jackson's flank attack had on the Union army. The artillery emplacements (lunettes) in front of you were constructed at a fairly leisurely rate on May 1 and 2, 1863. They face . . . — Map (db m3636) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Junction of Earthworks
Maj. Gen. Hiram G. Berry's division formed the front of the Union defense north of the Orange Turnpike on the morning of May 3. Although virtually all of Berry's entrenchments have disappeared, this small segment of works on the right marks the . . . — Map (db m12785) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Lee Renews the Attack
Confederate artillery here supported one of the largest infantry attacks of the Civil War. At dawn "Stonewall" Jackson's corps, now led by J.E.B. Stuart, struck the Union line from the west, in the woods to your left-front. At the same time, Lee's . . . — Map (db m3617) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Lee's Greatest Triumph
As Union resistance around the Chancellor house dissolved, Robert E. Lee rode into the clearing behind his victorious battalions. Though badly outnumbered, Lee in three days had stopped the initial Union advance, brazenly split his own army to . . . — Map (db m3818) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Lives Transformed
In 1860, Oscar Bullock and his wife, Catharine, lived in a modest two-and-one-half-story white frame house on this site. With them lived their two infant children and Catharine's 16-year-old brother, David Kyle (who would serve as a guide to . . . — Map (db m3697) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Matthew Fontaine MauryPathfinder of the Seas
Near this spot was born Matthew Fontaine 1806 Maury 1873 —— Pathfinder of the Seas Author of physical geography of the sea Founder of the science of meteorology First to conceive the idea of an Atlantic Cable Under his . . . — Map (db m3597) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Maury Birthplace
These scattered bricks and this shallow depression are all that remain of Matthew Fontaine Maury's birthplace. Maury's parents purchased this house and 103 acres of land from "Lighthorse Harry" Lee, Robert E. Lee's father, in 1797. The future . . . — Map (db m3598) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Maury House TrailThe Battle of Chancellorsville
This short trail leads to the birthplace of Matthew Fontaine Maury, one of America's greatest scientists. By the time of the Civil War, Maury's birthplace was gone, replaced by a simple brick house. Few of the 28,000 Confederate soldiers who . . . — Map (db m21933) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — McLaws TrailThe Battle of Fredericksburg
This trail will take you across the swampy headwaters of Ninemile Run, where for three days Confederate skirmishers of General Lafayette McLaws' division sparred with elements of Joseph Hooker's Union army. McLaws' spirited attacks fixed Hooker's . . . — Map (db m25644) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Memorializing Jackson's DeathThe Battle of Chancellorsville
Of his soldiers he was the idol; of his country he was the hope; of war he was the master. Senator John Warwick Daniel When General "Stonewall" Jackson died eight days after being wounded in these woods, shock waves rippled through the . . . — Map (db m19166) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Ordeal of the Wounded
After the May 3, 1863, fighting at Chancellorsville, the Confederates gathered up 500 wounded Union soldiers and brought them here to Fairview. For more than a week the helpless men lay in the yard around the house, receiving little medical care, . . . — Map (db m3640) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Stone's Reconnaissance
Union soldiers on the front line probably utilized these rifle pits on May 3-5. Trenches on the other side of the creek possibly served Confederate skirmishers. While the fighting raged near Salem Church, Union Maj. Gen. John F. Reynolds believed . . . — Map (db m12856) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — The 27th Indiana Infantry
3rd Brigade, 1st Div., 12th Corps Held this position from 7p.m. May 2nd to 9 a.m. May 3rd, 1863. Present for duty 300 Killed 36, Wounded 114 ——— Mustered in Aug. 1861, Mustered out Sept. 1864 Total enrollment 1,101. Killed 172. . . . — Map (db m3644) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — The Chancellor Slaves
Their names are unrecorded, their labors are rarely noted. No images of them survive. But slaves outnumbered Chancellor family members when Frances Chancellor moved into this house in 1861. Likely only a few of the 20 slaves owned by the Chancellors . . . — Map (db m5618) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — The Chancellorsville Intersection
The intersection in front of you was the focal point of the Chancellorsville Battlefield. From here roads radiated in five directions. Four of them are visible; the fifth, River Road, lies just beyond the trees to your left. From this intersection . . . — Map (db m3800) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — The Union Army Escapes
After dark, May 5, 1863, Union soldiers left their trenches and began making their way toward U.S. Ford. A cold rain drenched the soldiers to the skin and turned the woodland roads to mud. At the ford, the Rappahannock River rose five feet in three . . . — Map (db m12858) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — The Union CenterThe Battle of Chancellorsville
Upon reaching Chancellorsville on April 30, 1863, General Joseph Hooker deployed the Army of the Potomac in a defensive perimeter around the intersection. General Henry W. Slocum's Twelfth Corps held the center of the Union line. For three days his . . . — Map (db m21931) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — The Wilderness of Spotsylvania County
The armies fought the Battle of Chancellorsville in the heart of a 70-square-mile region of tangled undergrowth known locally as the Wilderness. This inhospitable terrain added a new dimension of horror to the fighting on May 3. Fires erupted from . . . — Map (db m5458) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Tyler’s Withdrawal To This Line1:00 P.M.
“Until near noon on May 3rd, the fighting was severe, when the ammunition of the infantry having been exhausted and repeated calls for more being unanswered, the line was forced to retire to the breast-works. The dead and most of the . . . — Map (db m79640) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Union Counterattack
On the morning of May 3, Col. Emlen Franklin's Union brigade shifted from south of the Orange Turnpike to this vicinity. Here, they met Pender and Thomas head on. Lt. Col. Jonathan H. Lockwood of the 7th Virginia (Union) remembered what happened . . . — Map (db m12847) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Union Earthworks
Men of Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock's division manned the earthworks which are located just inside this woodline. Hancock's troops confronted two Confederate divisions advancing from the south (from your right front) and east as well as the . . . — Map (db m3867) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — Union Lifeline
On April 30, 1863, Gen. George G. Meade's Union Fifth Corps advanced along this road toward Chancellorsville. As Meade's troops approached, Confederates on the Bullock Farm briefly resisted them, then disappeared into the woods to spread word of the . . . — Map (db m3690) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Chancellorsville — J-39 — Wounding of Jackson
Just 1.7 miles west, on this road (then the Orange Plank Road), Lt. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson was wounded by "friendly fire" about 9:30 P.M. on 2 May 1863 during the Battle of Chancellorsville. Having brilliantly executed a flanking . . . — Map (db m3513) HM

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