Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Charleston, West Virginia Historical Markers

 
"The West Virginia Coal Miner" Memorial image, Touch for more information
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
"The West Virginia Coal Miner" Memorial
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — "The West Virginia Coal Miner"
Earl Ray Tomblin President Senate        Bob Wise  Governor       Robert S. Kiss, Speaker House of Delegates                                                       By Resolution of the Seventy-Fourth Legislature            "The West . . . — Map (db m49802) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln was elected the 16th president of the U.S. in 1860. He received fewer than 2,000 votes in Virginia, most from present-day West Virginia. Lincoln preserved the Union, ended slavery, and played the decisive role in the admission . . . — Map (db m137890) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Abraham Lincoln Walks At Midnight
[East Side] "Abraham Lincoln Walks At Midnight" from poem by Vachel Lindsay Sculptor Fred Martin Torrey 1884-1967 Born in Fairmont, West Virginia Dedicated June 20, 1974 Arch A. Moore, Jr. Governor [South Side] . . . — Map (db m23019) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Baptism By FireTo Arms!
In July 1861, this area swarmed with retreating Confederate troops and pursuing Federal forces. Union Gen. George B. McClelland had ordered Gen. Jacob Cox to march his 3, 000 raw Ohio recruits into western Virginia from Gallipolis, Ohio, to drive . . . — Map (db m59146) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Battle of CharlestonDowntown Battleground — Jenkins's Raid —
(Preface): Confederate Gen. Albert G. Jenkins led 550 cavalrymen on a 500 mile raid, Aug. 22-Sept. 12, 1862, attacking Federal forces, capturing prisoners, and destroying military stores. From Salt Sulphur Springs he rode along the Tygart and . . . — Map (db m59137) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Battle of CharlestonLightburn's Retreat — Jenkins's Raid —
(Preface): Confederate Gen. Albert G. Jenkins led 550 cavalrymen on a 500-mile raid from Salt Sulphur Springs, Aug. 22-Sept. 12, 1862, attacking Federal forces and destroying military stores. He captured and paroled 300 Union soldiers, . . . — Map (db m59143) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Booker Taliaferro Washington
1856 - Born a lowly slave; 1915 - Died a great American. Famous educator, author, lecturer and advocate of the doctrine of interracial cooperation. Booker T. Washington was born near Hale's Ford, Franklin, County, VA. He spent his . . . — Map (db m23024) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Charleston
Founded by George Clendenin and named for his father. Established, 1794. Fort Lee, built 1788, stood on Kanawha River. “Mad Anne” Bailey, the border heroine, and Daniel Boone and Simon Kenton, noted scouts, once lived here. . . . — Map (db m126868) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Charleston 's Civil War SitesThe Past is Present
Two significant dwellings that stood elsewhere during the Civil War have been relocated to this park for public use: Craik-Patton House. The Rev. James Craik, son of George Washington’s personal secretary, constructed this house in downtown . . . — Map (db m59136) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Craik-Patton House
Built 1834 as "Elm Grove" by James Craik, grandson of Geo. Washington's personal physician. Sold to George Smith Patton, 1858, and retained by family until end of Civil War. Born here was father of noted World War II general Geo. S. Patton. Moved to . . . — Map (db m50419) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Daniel Boone
Across the Great Kanawha River, lived Daniel Boone, the noted frontiersman, from about 1788 to 1795. He represented Kanawha County in the Virginia Assembly, 1791; was Lieut. Col. of Virginia militia during Indian wars. — Map (db m50466) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Daniel BooneThe Western Virginia Pioneer 1788-1799
1789 Lt. Col. Of Kanawha Militia An Organizer of Kanawha County 1791 Delegate to Virginia Assembly His Cabin was Across the River from Cave in Cliff Above He hunted Deer and Made Salt From a Spring at the Water's Edge

Erected by . . . — Map (db m50467) HM

West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Dedicated to You, A Free Citizen in a Free LandWest Virginia's Liberty Bell Replica
This reproduction of the Liberty Bell was presented to the people of West Virginia by direction of The Honorable John W. Snyder Secretary of the Treasury As the inspirational symbol of the United States Savings Bonds . . . — Map (db m128488) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Executive Mansion
In 1924, ground was broken for this magnificent Georgian colonial style mansion, official home of the State's governors since 1926. Designed by W. F. Martens, it was constructed of colonial Harvard brick at an initial cost of $203,000. — Map (db m42673) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — First Gas Well
In 1815 Captain James Wilson while drilling here for salt brine vowed he would drill to Hades if necessary. A large flow of gas was struck that ignited and burned with a huge flame, apparently fulfilling the captain's original vow. — Map (db m50417) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Fort Clendenin1788
[Front] Saved by two historic rides for powder. Ann Bailey on horseback through wilderness to Lewisburg and return. Fleming Cobbs poled down Kanawha River to Point Pleasant and return. [Rear] This boulder is . . . — Map (db m23013) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Fort Lee
A western frontier outpost, guarding settlers against the Indians. Built here in 1788 and named for Gen. Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee, one of Washington's most trusted officers. Later Lee was governor of Virginia. — Map (db m50416) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Fort Scammon
With a commanding view of the area below, present-day Fort Hill was used by both Civil War armies. The Confederate push into the Kanawha Valley in 1862 relied on artillery on the heights, and Union troops created a more permanent presence in 1863, . . . — Map (db m137903) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — George W. Summers
Born in Fairfax County in 1804. he came to Kanawha Valley as a child. Secured reforms benefiting western Virginia at 1850-51 Constitutional Convention. Served at 1861 Peace Conference that tried to avoid war and voted against secession at . . . — Map (db m137910) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Kanawha RiflemenHometown Boys in Gray
A memorial dedicated to the Kanawha Riflemen stands across the road behind you, on the exact route of the James River and Kanawha Turnpike. Former Confederate Gen. John McCausland, the last surviving Confederate general officer, attended the . . . — Map (db m126800) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Kanawha Riflemen1861-1865
This memorial erected by the Kanawha Riflemen Chapter United Daughters of the Confederacy in honor of the Kanawha Riflemen First organization of the company 1856 Capt. George S. Patton ∙ First Lieut. Andrew Moore ∙ . . . — Map (db m126876) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Lewis’ March
Near this place, the army of Gen. Andrew Lewis camped, Sept. 21, 1774, enroute from Lewisburg. From Charleston, Lewis led his men by land and water to Point Pleasant where Cornstalk’s Indians were defeated, Oct. 10, 1774. — Map (db m76824) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — KA 3/KA 4 — Malden / Booker T. Washington Homeplace
Marker Front: Malden Early salt-making industry that was centered here peaked in the 1850s. In 1755, Mary Ingles and Betty Draper made salt for their Indian captors here at "Buffalo Salt Licks." John Dickinson bought the site in 1785. . . . — Map (db m76880) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Military OccupationA Bitter Pill to Swallow
"I direct you to have guns in readiness to fire on Charleston. If rebels come in here Charleston shall be destroyed, for it is the work of disloyal citizens." - Gen. Eliakim P. Scammon, May 112, 1863, to Col. Rutherford B. Hayes. Union and . . . — Map (db m59139) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Presidential PresenceTending to Family, Fort, and Ferry
Camp White, the main Union camp at Charleston, was located directly across the Kanawha River from here. Col. Rutherford B. Hayes, 23rd Ohio Infantry, occupied the camp and Charleston in March 1863. He ordered his men to build a fort on top of the . . . — Map (db m59521) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Rev. Ruffner's Grave
In cemetery nearby is grave of Dr. Henry Ruffner, eminent theologian and writer, called father of Presbyterianism in the Kanawha region. After his ministry, he became head of Washington College, Lexington, Va. Wrote Ruffner Pamphlet. — Map (db m76879) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — X-2 — Ruffner Well
In 1808 David and Joseph Ruffner near here on the bank of the Kanawha completed a well into solid rock to a depth of 59 feet by a method and with drilling tools they devised, which was further developed in this valley by themselves and Billye Morris . . . — Map (db m76859) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — State Capitol
West Virginia's Capitol first located in Wheeling, 1863; moved to Charleston, 1870; back to Wheeling, 1875; and finally to Charleston, 1885. It was located two miles west until destroyed by fire, 1921. Present building was completed in 1931. — Map (db m23018) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — State Capitol
West Virginia's Capitol first located in Wheeling, 1863; located in Charleston, 1870; again in Wheeling, 1875, and finally in Charleston, 1885. It was located 2 mi. west until destroyed by fire, 1921. Present building was completed in 1932. — Map (db m42674) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — State Capitol
Constructed of buff Indiana limestone and lined with Imperial Danby marble from Vermont, the State's Capitol is considered one of the world's superb examples of Italian Renaissance architecture. Designed by the internationally prominent Cass Gilbert . . . — Map (db m42676) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — State Capitol
West Virginia's Capitol is much traveled; Wheeling to Charleston to Wheeling and then back to Charleston, it moved. At this spot it stood from 1885 until destroyed by fire in 1921. The Capitol now stands two miles east. — Map (db m76738) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Temple Israel - 1873
Site of the First Permanent Jewish House of Worship in the State of West Virginia. Temple Israel 1873 — Map (db m134323) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — The 35th Star* * * West Virginia Statehood
Sectional differences in western and eastern Virginia fueled resentment and political divisions before the Civil War. The divisions soon became irrevocable after the convention in Richmond voted on April 17, 1861, for Virginia to secede and join . . . — Map (db m42895) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — The Block
Heart of the black community, area was the center for black business, education, religion, and social life but also had Greek, Italian, Lebanese and Syrian businesses. Many local black leaders had ties to the area, which declined due to 1960s urban . . . — Map (db m76741) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — The Block
Heart of the black community, area was the center for black business, education, religion, and social life but also had Greek, Italian, Lebanese and Syrian businesses. Many local black leaders had ties to the area, which declined due to 1960s urban . . . — Map (db m76760) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — The New Deal In Your CommunityKanawha Boulevard
Kanawha Boulevard has gone by various names throughout history. The Boulevard was known as Front Street when "Charles Town" was chartered in 1794. Through the years, it has been called First Street, Water Street and Kanawha Street prior to being . . . — Map (db m85208) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — The Ruffners
Grave of Joseph Ruffner, who bought the site of Charleston from the Clendenins. His son, Daniel, built Holly Mansion on Kanawha Street in 1815. The Ruffners aided oil and gas development by improved drills used in salt wells. — Map (db m23014) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Thomas J. Jackson"Stonewall"
[South Side] Born Jan. 21, 1824 Clarksburg, VA. Now West Virginia, Confederate General Died May 10, 1863 [East Side] This monument first located on original state capitol grounds Sept. 27, 1910; relocated to the present . . . — Map (db m23016) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — Union Civil War Monument
[South Side] In memory of the thirty-two thousand soldiers, sailors, and marines contributed by West Virginia to the service of the Union during the Civil War 1861-1865 [East Side] This monument erected A.D. 1930 by the Union . . . — Map (db m23025) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — War At The Front DoorLittlepage Mansion
In July 1861, this area swarmed with retreating Confederate troops and pursuing Federal forces. Union Gen. George B. McClellan had ordered Gen. Jacob Cox to march his 3,000 raw Ohio recruits into western Virginia from Gallipolis, Ohio, to drive . . . — Map (db m59150) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — West Virginia Home Guards
[East Side] Montani Semper Liberi Dedicated to the hallowed memories of the brave men and devoted women who saved West Virginia to the Union. Presented to the state and people of West Virginia through the instrumentalities of the Grand . . . — Map (db m23055) HM
West Virginia (Kanawha County), Charleston — William Blizzard
Born in Kanawha County on 19 September 1892. Began work as a miner at age ten, and served as field organizer, UMWA. Noted as leader of 1921 Armed March. Indicted for treason but later acquitted. President of District 17 and vice-president of West . . . — Map (db m23011) HM

42 markers matched your search criteria.
Paid Advertisement