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Clifton, Virginia Historical Markers

 
The “Pink” House image, Touch for more information
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2017
The “Pink” House
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — “Pink” House1905
The house was built by the Ambler family who maintained a farm outside of town where they grew various crops. In the 1960's a business located here painted the building pink and it has been known by locals ever since as the “Pink” House. — Map (db m112194) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Barber Shop1884
The front portion of this building first served as an out kitchen for the Payne House. Around 1918 it was moved across Chapel Street where it served as home for the train agent. In 1955 the first floor became Tom Fairfax's barber shop until the mid . . . — Map (db m112332) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Bradley House1870
Owned by Rev. Wm. Bradley & his wife Elisabeth, the first Presbyterian Minister in Clifton, the parents of Margaret Riviere Hetzel, who taught the first School in Clifton

Restored in 1981 — Map (db m114222) HM

Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Buckley Storec. 1900
“From a pin to a plow” was the Buckley Brothers' motto for their general store which was the largest store between Alexandria and Front Royal at one time. Since the Clifton School did not own a scale, the scales in the store were used to . . . — Map (db m110135) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Circa 1884
This building was built as a General Mercantile Store and through the years has been occupied as a Saloon, Bakery, Grocery, Pool Hall, Cabinet Shop and Church. The addition was added in 1926 for a Barber Shop. The building was completely . . . — Map (db m114275) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Clifton Baptist Church1876
In 1876, George W. Tillet, along with other area men who served with Mosby’s Rangers during the Civil War, formed a Baptist Church with services held in his home. Subsequently, they built a one-room church on this site in 1877 which was replaced by . . . — Map (db m110179) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Clifton Hotel
Built by Harrison G. Otis. A popular resort hotel during the last quarter of the 19th century, offering health of the 19th century mineral water from its Paradise Spring and the finest in southern cuisine. Presidents Arthur, Grant, Hayes, Roosevelt, . . . — Map (db m112196) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Clifton Presbyterian Church1870
After the Civil War, residents seeking Christian fellowship and education organized a Sunday School in the Hetzel House at the corner of Chapel and Pendleton streets. In 1869, nine members of the community organized Clifton Presbyterian Church, . . . — Map (db m110160) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Clifton Primitive Baptist Church1871
Built in 1871 as the Clifton Old School Primitive Baptist Church, it is the oldest African-American church in Fairfax County. The town of Clifton was initially inhabited by emancipated slaves and the church was built on land donated by one of them, . . . — Map (db m110265) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Davis Buckley House1913
Built in 1913 for Lucy Virginia Davis Buckley, who lived here with her youngest daughter unti1 1923. It has been the home of two of Clifton's Mayors, W. Swem Elgin and James C. Chesley. Clifton's third elementary school (1895-1912) and the first . . . — Map (db m114077) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Detwiler HouseCa. 1900
Samuel Detwiler lived in this house in 1905 when he was the town liveryman. With the demise of the horse and buggy, he and his son Frank began a dairy farm. Their barn was located where the Post Office now stands. Each day they would herd their cows . . . — Map (db m112292) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — E-101 — Devereux Station
In 1863, during the Civil War, Pennsylvanian Herman Haupt, a noted bridge designer and the superintendent of Union military railroads, commissioned John Devereux, the railroad superintendent in Alexandria, to build a siding on the Orange & . . . — Map (db m7402) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Devereux StationOrange and Alexandria Railroad
Devereux Station, constructed in 1863 on the Orange and Alexandria (O&A) Railroad, was located down the tracks to your left. After the Confederate army withdrew from northern Virginia toward Richmond in March 1862, the U.S. Military Railroad (USMRR) . . . — Map (db m57200) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Fairfax House1905
This house was originally the summer kitchen for the wine house next door. The building was moved to its current location, converted into a home and sold to Mr. Spinks in 1908. The house later became the home of the Fairfax family until it was sold . . . — Map (db m113663) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Ferndaleca. 1904
The Poindexter family built this house in the Folk Victorian style. An old postcard written by Laura Poindexter revealed that the house was named "Ferndale". Long time Clifton resident, Margaret Detwiler Webb lived and painted here as a young woman . . . — Map (db m112190) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Fulmer Brill Houseca. 1912
Owned by just two families before its first restoration in 2002 this house was built by J .M. Fulmer just one year after finishing a larger home on Chapel Street next to the Clifton Baptist Church. The Spring House in the front yard once provided . . . — Map (db m114528) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Fulmer House
Built in 1910 by Clifton lumber merchant J. M. Fulmer. Two times mayor of Clifton, 1920 — 1924 and 1930 — 1936, Fulmer was known as the town strong man. This house is an excellent example of the Carpenter Gothic architectural syle . . . — Map (db m114196) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Harris House1830
. . . — Map (db m114033) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Huckbill1902
Built by H. Longley. Oscar Woody, who was a member of the railroad and sea postal services, bought the house in 1910. He was on duty on the Titanic when she went down on his 41st birthday. He was buried at sea on April 24, 1912. — Map (db m112192) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Ivakota Farm
On this land stood Ivakota Farm, founded as a Progressive Era reform school and home for unwed mothers and their children. In 1915 Ella Shaw donated her 264-acre farm to the National Florence Crittenton Mission (NFCM). Named for the states where she . . . — Map (db m7401) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Kidwell House1890
Longtime Clifton residents, the A.J. Kidwell family resided here beginning in 1890 for nearly 60 years. The town blacksmith, Kidwell was a prominent citizen and member of the first Town Council in 1902. He operated a smithy located in the now vacant . . . — Map (db m114031) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Kincheloe House1900
Huckster George Kinchloe worked the area until the end of Prohibition. His wife "Aunt Inez" then opened the house to boarders. 5¢ buckets of beer were delivered every Friday night to the thirsty school teachers residing here. Later, the left front . . . — Map (db m112191) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — McDaniel House1895
Built on a lot owned by a freed slave. This house was in the Pitkin family for over 60 years. A major addition in 1995 changed the focus to a brick courtyard in the rear of the house. — Map (db m114179) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Old Dominion Stone Company Millstone
Between 1891 and 1932, the Old Dominion Stone Company quarried and processed soapstone at a location within the current Little Rocky Run community. This millstone was use to grind the soapstone into a fine powder called talc. This millstone . . . — Map (db m76483) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Old Town Hall
This house originally built by the Corsens and was later inhabited by the Gunther family. It was aquired by the town of Clifton in 1973 as a location for town meetings. — Map (db m114181) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Payne Housec.1884
Home of Melvin M. Payne, a housebuilder and lumber broker to the railroads. Payne’s bench mark, a split tree and cross, can be found ‘branded’ on the framing of many older Clifton area homes. It is also carved into the parlor mantel. — Map (db m112214) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Quigg House1874
Clifton was the largest town in Fairfax County when Louis Quigg built this Victorian house. It was considered the finest with its mansard roof and open 5 story staircase. The best in furnishings and adornments in New York made the Quigg House the . . . — Map (db m112199) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Sangster’s Station“Tears And Love For the Blue—Love and Tears for the Grey”
During the Civil War, the Orange & Alexandria Railroad was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederate armies. Sangster's Station, located 1-3/4 miles to your right where Colchester Road crosses under the railroad tracks, was the . . . — Map (db m110134) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Southard1904
In December 1904, this home on Dell Avenue's “Lot No. 1” was one of six houses put up on the just-named street. Purchased by O.C. Southard, railway mail clerk, it was built as part of a partnership between R.M. Kivett and the Buckley . . . — Map (db m114473) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Susan Riviere Hetzel
. . . — Map (db m112358) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Sutphin HouseCa. 1951
This country cottage was built by Alvin, Ollie and Lewie Poe on land once a part of Detwiler's Dairy Farm. The construction is fir lumber, featuring old schoolhouse windows on the back porch. Mrs. Sutphin resided here for over 45 years and served as . . . — Map (db m112368) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — The Fairfax HeraldJune 29, 1917
“Mr. J.M. Fulmer was unfortunate enough to lose one of his horses, Saturday night. He had been plowing during the day and it is supposed that the horse drank too much water while warm.” This walking plow lay intact in the weeds . . . — Map (db m114530) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Union Mills Historic Site
In the late 18th century, following the American Revolution, this area of Fairfax County began to be referred to as Union Mills. Covering five or six square miles between Popes Head Run and Johnny Moore Run, it was recognized for its water powered . . . — Map (db m11464) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Weaver House
The original structure was built in 1898 as a residence for the Weaver’s who owned the general store next door. It was destroyed by a fire in 1930 that erupted in the general store. The present structure was built in the early 1930’s as a residence . . . — Map (db m112177) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Wine House1905
Originally built in 1905 by C.H. Wine who was a builder as well as one of the organizers and treasurer of the Bull Run Power Company. The house was enlarged and restored in 1973 and retains the charm and architecture of the Victorian era. — Map (db m113656) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Wm. E. Beckwith House1771
The original portion was built of logs and contained a huge stone fireplace still visible today. Modified through the years its most illustrious moment in history as during the Civil War years 1862, when it served as General Pope's headquarters. — Map (db m110280) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Wolf Run ShoalsStrategic Crossing Point
During the Civil War, both Union and Confederate forces considered Wolf Run Shoals an essential crossing point on the Occoquan River through 1963. Confederate regiments camped on the south side of the shoals and posted pickets there from the winter . . . — Map (db m74885) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Clifton — Woodyard Housec. 1899
This house built by Wallace Woodyard who was one of Clifton's great lumber merchants. It contains the best in material and workmanship. Completely restored in 1969. — Map (db m112315) HM

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