Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Columbia, Alabama Historical Markers

 
Columbia Baptist Church Marker image, Touch for more information
By Mark Hilton, May 1, 2014
Columbia Baptist Church Marker
Alabama (Houston County), Columbia — Columbia Baptist Church
On North Main Street (Alabama Route 95) at River Street, on the right when traveling north on North Main Street.
Side 1 This church was constituted in 1835 following the withdrawal of six people from Omussee Baptist Church in a dispute over the role of missions. The first pastor Edmund Talbot, who served the Church until 1853, donated that land and . . . — Map (db m73361) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Columbia — Columbia Cemetery Houston County
Near West Church Street west of North Washington Street.
Front The Columbia Cemetery was started in the 1830s on land given by Rev. Edmund Talbot. It postdates the abandoned Omussee Creek Church Cemetery located a mile SW of here. A "public Meeting house," which served as the Columbia . . . — Map (db m115031) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Columbia — Columbia Methodist Episcopal Church, South
On East Church Street (Alabama Route 52) at South Davis Street, on the right when traveling east on East Church Street.
Side 1 History suggests that, in the early 1820's, circuit riding preachers from the South Carolina Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church arrived in the newly settled town of Columbia. Assigned to the Early County Mission in . . . — Map (db m73363) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Columbia — Columbia, Alabama
On South Main Street at West Church Street (Alabama Route 52), on the right when traveling south on South Main Street.
Founded in 1820, Columbia was originally located about a mile south, near where the Omussee Creek flows into the Chattahoochee River. It served as the county seat of Henry County from 1826 to 1833. Bordering the State of Georgia and the . . . — Map (db m73364) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Columbia — Old Columbia Jail / Columbia
On East North Street at South Main Street, on the left when traveling west on East North Street.
(side 1) Old Columbia Jail Erected sometime in the early 1860's, the Old Columbia Jail is today one of the last wooden jails still standing in Alabama. Originally, there were two cells, each measuring 10 x 15 feet. Interior . . . — Map (db m73368) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Columbia — Omussee Creek Mound and Mississippian Period Societies Creek Heritage Trail
On Omussee Creek Road 0.5 miles north of Picnic Road, on the right when traveling north.
Near where you stand lies Omussee Creek Mound, the southernmost platform mound along the Chattahoochee River, occupied approximately 1300 to 1550 A.D. as part of an important Native American settlement. This region of southeastern Alabama and . . . — Map (db m115032) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Columbia — Omussee Creek Mound and the Ancestors of the Creeks Creek Heritage Trail
On Omussee Creek Road 0.5 miles north of Picnic Road, on the right when traveling north.
We do not know the exact date that residents of the community of which Omussee Creek Mound was a part abandoned the mound, but by around 1550 it was definitely in decline. Many believe this may have been part of a broader, regional depopulation due . . . — Map (db m115034) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Columbia — Purcell - Killingsworth House
On North Main Street (Alabama Route 95) at Clark Street, on the right when traveling south on North Main Street.
This house, also known as Travelers Rest, was completed in 1890 by William Henry Purcell (1845-1910) a prominent Columbia businessman and politician. Purcell had many business interests including a steamboat landing on the Chattahoochee River. This . . . — Map (db m73370) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Columbia — The Chacato People Creek Heritage Trail
On Omussee Creek Road 0.5 miles north of Picnic Road, on the right when traveling north.
The original builders of the Omussee Creek mound had abandoned the site by around 1550, but the area continued to be occupied by Native American groups well into the early nineteenth century. As early as the 1630s, Spanish missionaries from . . . — Map (db m115037) HM

9 markers matched your search criteria.
Paid Advertisement