Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Flippin, Kentucky Historical Markers

 
Camp Anderson Marker image, Touch for more information
By Chad Comer, July 6, 2012
Camp Anderson Marker
Kentucky (Monroe County), Flippin — 1391 — Camp Anderson
Camp established by Union Army to train and drill troops and as a place of rendezvous. In October 1861, Col. S. S. Stanton, 25th Tennessee Infantry, Confederate Army, was ordered to capture the encampment. He marched his regiment into the county and . . . — Map (db m127736) HM
Kentucky (Monroe County), Flippin — Daniel Boone Was Here
South of "Old Pikeville Rd" and Thomas Flippin's land was a military grant of 1,800 acres awarded to Virginia Navy Captain Thomas Lilly for his service in the American Revolutionary War, assigned to Charles Copland (1,442 acres) and William Croghan . . . — Map (db m130641) HM
Kentucky (Monroe County), Flippin — 1394 — Famous Tree / Indian Creek Church
Famous Tree In 1894, a huge Tulip Poplar tree was felled about 1½ miles south of this site. It measured 11 feet in diameter, 35 feet in circumference. Two six-foot saws were welded together to cut it. A four-foot log from the tree was . . . — Map (db m130640) HM
Kentucky (Monroe County), Flippin — Fraim Cemetery
John M. Fraim organized the 9th Kentucky Infantry (USA) at Camp Anderson in 1861. Monroe County Cemetery Book Volume 2, page 98-99. — Map (db m127889) HM
Kentucky (Monroe County), Flippin — Pikesville
The proprietary town of "Pikesville" was established here with 10 streets and public square in August, 1818, east of Pikesville Branch and north of "Old Pikeville Rd" on 75 acres of land granted to Thomas Flippin in 1798. Pikesville was narrowly . . . — Map (db m130643) HM

5 markers matched your search criteria.  
 
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.