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Fredericksburg, Virginia Historical Markers

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Spotsylvania County Face of Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, September 19, 2009
Spotsylvania County Face of Marker
Virginia (Caroline County), Fredericksburg — Z-200 — Caroline County / Spotsylvania CountyArea 529 Square Miles / Area 413 Square Miles
Caroline County. Area 529 Square Miles. Formed in 1727 from Essex, King and Queen, and King William. Named for Queen Caroline, wife of King George II. George Rogers Clark, conqueror of the Northwest, passed his youth in this . . . — Map (db m22585) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Fredericksburg — N-11 — Jackson's Headquarters
In an outhouse here at Moss Neck, Stonewall Jackson had his headquarters, December, 1862-March, 1863. He was engaged in guarding the line of the Rappahannock with his corps of Lee's army. — Map (db m19286) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — E-49A — “Fall Hill”
On the heights one mile to the west, the home of the Thorntons from about 1736. Francis Thornton 2nd was a Justice, a Burgess 1744-45, and Lieut.-Colonel of his Majesty's militia for Spotsylvania County. He and two of his brothers married three . . . — Map (db m4749) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — E-49B — “Fall Hill”
On the heights one mile to the west, the home of the Thorntons from about 1736. Francis Thornton 2nd was a Justice, a Burgess 1744-45, and Lieut.-Colonel of his Majesty's militia for Spotsylvania County. He and two of his brothers married three . . . — Map (db m5094) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — 127th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
(Front): 127th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Col. W. W. Jennings Commanding 3rd Brigade 2nd Division 2nd Corps (Rear):127th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Col. W. W. Jennings Commanding 3rd Brigade 2nd Division . . . — Map (db m9089) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — 7th Michigan Volunteer Infantry
“Dark rolled the Rappahannock’s flood,                     Michigan, my Michigan; The tide was crimsoned with thy blood,                     Michigan, my Michigan; Although for us the day was lost, Yet it shall be our proudest . . . — Map (db m5374) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — A Canal Defines its Neighborhood
The canal in front of you is a section of a navigation system that extended 50 miles up the Rappahannock River. The downstream terminus was a turning basin, in the block to your right. Several industries were established nearby, some that benefited . . . — Map (db m1068) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — A Canal Defines Its Neighborhood
The canal in front of you, constructed in the 1830s, was part of a navigation system that extended 50 miles up the Rappahannock River. The downstream terminus was a turning basin, in the block to your right. Several industries were located nearby, . . . — Map (db m95316) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — A DiversionThe Second Battle of Fredericksburg
3 May 1863. During the Chancellorsville Campaign, Brigadier General John Gibbon deployed his Union division in this area in support of other federal units in Fredericksburg. On the morning of May 3, Gibbon’s troops rushed forward to assault . . . — Map (db m1064) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — A Diversion: Second Battle of Fredericksburg
On May 3, 1863, Brigadier General John Gibbon advanced his division into this area in support of Federal attacks on Marye’s Heights. Union troops rushed forward to cross this canal and assault the hills in front of you, but the Confederates had . . . — Map (db m95313) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — A History of Floods
Fredericksburg has experienced floods since its earliest settlement. The Rappahannock River originates 77 miles to the west, in a mountain spring, and the upriver watershed drains a very large expanse. By the time is passes Fredericksburg, the . . . — Map (db m90971) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — A Memorial Landscape
On this site, the Fredericksburg Area Veteran's Council honors the local men and women who gave their lives in wars and military actions during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The extension of George Street to a new high school cut . . . — Map (db m64223) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — A Navigation Canal Becomes a Raceway
The Rappahannock Navigation system provided a means to transport bulk cargo between Fredericksburg and upriver farms and mines. In 1829, with financial assistance from Virginia’s Board for Public Works, the Rappahannock Company began construction of . . . — Map (db m7179) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — A Once Promising Canal Becomes a Raceway
Beginning in 1829, the Rappahannock Company constructed a series of dams and canals along the river, to transport bulk cargo. Gold had been found in Spotsylvania County in 1806 and a canal could bring heavy equipment and other materials to the . . . — Map (db m95304) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — A Vast Hospital
Wounded Union Soldiers in a Fredericksburg yard, May 1864. All but one of these men have been wounded in the leg. Most of the wounded soldiers brought to Fredericksburg survived… …But some did not. Hundreds of men died in the hospitals here . . . — Map (db m2575) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — A Vibrant, But Segregated Community
In the aftermath of the Civil War, numerous former slaves came to Fredericksburg where there was already an established free black community. Many freedmen took work as laborers and servants. Others brought artisan skills they had practiced in . . . — Map (db m733) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — African Baptist Church of Fredericksburg
The Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site) resides on the site once occupied by the African Baptist Church. Constructed as the Fredericksburg Baptist Church, the building was sold to its African-American members in 1857, after the white congregation had . . . — Map (db m1084) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — N-38 — Amoroleck Encounters John Smith
In August 1608, the first meeting between the Mannahoac Indian people of the Piedmont and the English colonists at Jamestown occurred at the falls of the Rappahannock River. Men from the upriver town of Hasinninga were hunting here at the eastern . . . — Map (db m9218) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Andrew Atkinson Humphreys
(Front): Erected by Pennsylvania to commemorate the charge of General Humphreys' Division Fifth Corps· On Marye's Heights Fredericksburg Virginia December·13·1862 134th 129th 126th 91st 131st 133rd 123rd 155th Penna · Vol · Inf Brigadier . . . — Map (db m8751) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Angel of Marye's Heights — The Battle of Fredericksburg
While the Civil War entailed immense destruction and tragedy, it did not always engender hate. For two days following the battle, wounded Union soldiers, caught between the lines, cried out for water. Though exposure to enemy fire even for a moment . . . — Map (db m8661) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Artillery on Lee's Hill
(Left marker): Here and on hills to the left and right the Confederates developed a powerful concentration of artillery. Enfilading Fire During the Federal attacks of December 13, 1862, Confederates cannon poured devasting . . . — Map (db m4178) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Auction Block
Fredericksburg’s Principal Auction Site in Pre-Civil War Days for Slaves and Property. — Map (db m5598) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Barton Street Confederate Monument
This monument is dedicated to honor the memory of the 51 Confederate Soldiers buried here in the Barton Street Cemetery. They died in Fredericksburg, Virginia between the months of October 1861 and March 1862. The Rev. Alfred M. Randolph of St. . . . — Map (db m39824) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Battle of Fredericksburg
December 13, 1862 the Confederates under Lee defeated the Federals under Burnside in a sanguinary conflict marked by extraordinary bravery on both sides. In a series of gallant charges the Federal army sustained heavy losses and Burnside was forced . . . — Map (db m4762) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — E-44 — Battles of Fredericksburg
During the First and Second Battles of Fredericksburg, the Confederates occupied Marye’s Heights, a defensive position enhanced by a sunken road and stone wall on the eastern slope. On 13 Dec. 1862, during the first battle, Lt. Gen. James . . . — Map (db m1672) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Big Gun at Howison Hill — The Battle of Fredericksburg
Two weeks of Union delay before the Battle of Fredericksburg gave the Confederates time to bring up large cannons rarely seen on other battlefields in Virginia. The sturdy gun emplacements above you protected a huge siege gun, capable of firing a . . . — Map (db m8863) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Bound for FreedomTrail to Freedom
“Fredericksburg is a captured town, the enemy took possession of the Stafford Hills … and their guns have frowned down upon us ever since… The Federal army has abolished slavery wherever it has gone.” — Jane Beale, a . . . — Map (db m32388) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Bridgewater MillsRappahannock Electric Light & Power Company
On the site formerly stood office and warehouse of the Bridgewater Mills 1822 - 1908 Operated by members of the Ficklen family, this concern's flour won first prize at the world's first international exposition held at Paris, France in 1878. . . . — Map (db m76514) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — N-32 — Brig. Gen. John Minor
Hazel Hill, the home of John Minor (13 May 1761 – 8 June 1816), a close friend of President James Monroe, once occupied this site. Minor served as a soldier in the American Revolution, as a colonel if the Spotsylvania County militia, and as a . . . — Map (db m1129) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Brompton — The Battle of Fredericksburg
The house and grounds are not open to the public. "The pillars of the porch...were speckled with the marks of bullets. Shells and shot had made sad havoc with the walls and the woodwork inside. The windows were shivered, the partitions torn . . . — Map (db m8635) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Building a Railroad Through a Stream Valley
In the 1850s, work gangs leveled this railway bed by cutting through hills and filling in valleys. They established culverts where the mounded earth would have otherwise blocked streams. To construct such facilities, they first laid down . . . — Map (db m95323) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Calvin Coolidge
Dedicated October 19, 1928 by Calvin Coolidge President of the United States To commemorate the beginning of work on the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Battlefields Memorial, authorized by act of Congress . . . — Map (db m33410) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — N-30 — Camp Cobb at Gunnery Springs
Camp Cobb at Gunnery Springs N-30 In 1775, during the Revolutionary War, this “noble spring” was part of a 10½-acre tract purchased for the Fredericksburg Gun Manufactory. On this site in 1898 stood Camp Cobb, a Spanish-American War . . . — Map (db m1711) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Carl's
. . . — Map (db m67085) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Civil War DefensesDecember 1862
In December of 1862, with a Federal attack imminent, General Robert E. Lee deployed his Confederate Army of Northern Virginia along a series of hills around the town of Fredericksburg. Brigadier General Cadmus M. Wilcox and his Alabama brigade took . . . — Map (db m7147) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Clara Barton
1862 - 1962 In Memory of Clara BartonFounder of the American Red Cross. A devoted nurse and tireless organizer who knew no enemy but the unfeeling heart. We walk the ways she took in easing the suffering at the Battle of Fredericksburg when the . . . — Map (db m14428) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Col. George Eskridge Memorial TreeApril 29, 1937
May this Oak Tree from "Sandy Point" Westmoreland Co. Virginia, home of Col. George Eskridge, who was guardian for Mary Ball, shelter her last resting place, as she in her early childhood was sheltered and protected by her beloved guardian. As . . . — Map (db m9197) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Col. Joseph A. Moesch83rd New York Volunteers — Ninth Regiment New York State Militia
(Front): In memory of Col. Joseph A. Moesch Killed at the Wilderness May 6, 1864 ——— Erected by Surviving Comrades (Rear): 83rd N.Y. Vol's ——— Ninth Regiment N.Y.S.M. -- N.G.S.N.Y. 2nd Brig. 2nd . . . — Map (db m9092) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Confederate and Federal Defenses in May 1863
Heavy fighting erupted in this area on May 3rd and 4th, during the Chancellorsville campaign. On May 3rd, Brigadier General Cadmus M. Wilcox moved several Alabama regiments into the area (1) and confronted Federal forces at this canal (2). When the . . . — Map (db m95307) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Confederate Artillery — The Battle of Fredericksburg
Artillery was an effective weapon, particularly when used in defensive combat. Nowhere was that demonstrated more clearly than here on Marye's Heights, where nine guns of the Washington Artillery shattered the ranks of the oncoming Union army. "The . . . — Map (db m8690) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Confederate Artillery Defense
About noon         December 13, 1862 Army of Northern Virginia General Robert E. Lee, Commander Brigadier General W. N. Pendleton Chief of Artillery 304 guns on the battlefield Army of the Potomac Major General A. E. . . . — Map (db m4135) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Confederate Cemetery
The Ladies Memorial Association of Fredericksburg, organized May 10, 1866, cares for the graves and honors those Confederate soldiers who died in this area’s four battles. The Cemetery was dedicated May, 1870 to 3,553 men from 14 States reinterred . . . — Map (db m60375) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Confederate Defenses in December 1862
In December 1862, General Robert E. Lee deployed his Confederate army along a series of hills around the town of Fredericksburg. In front of you is Fall Hill, which anchored the Confederate line at the Rappahannock River. Brigadier General Cadmus M. . . . — Map (db m95306) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Confederates on the Ridge — The Battle of Fredericksburg
"What chance had flesh and blood to carry by storm such a position, garrisoned too as it was with veteran soldiers? Not one chance in a million." Alexander Hunter, 17th Virginia Infantry. At noon, December 13, 1862, the first of nine Union . . . — Map (db m8689) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Contact: An Industrial Society Confronts A Native American Culture
“They use also long arrows tyed in a line wherewith they shoot at fish in the rivers.” —Captain John Smith In 1608, shortly after Jamestown had been established, Captain John Smith and a small crew worked a vessel up . . . — Map (db m95619) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Corporation Court House
(Left Side Plaque):City of Fredericksburg Virginia Corporation Court House Erected 1851-52 Mayor .....Robert B. Semple Judge of Court .. John Tayloe Lomax Building Commissioners Thomas B. Berton, chairman B.R. Wellford William Allen John . . . — Map (db m14432) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Elmhurst — circa 1871
has been registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark by the Virginia Board of Historic Resources and placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Department of the Interior — Map (db m76516) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Embrey Dam
In 1909-10, the Fredericksburg Water Power Company constructed the Embrey Dam and its power plant on Caroline Street, for the express purpose of generating electric power. The increasing number of uses for this emerging technology encouraged such an . . . — Map (db m7663) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Encounter at the Fall LineJohn Smith's meeting with the Mannahoacks
In August of 1608, Captain John Smith and his crew explored the lower Rappahannock from the Chesapeake Bay to a point just upstream from this location. Soon after landing, the group was attacked by Mannahoack Indians, a Siouan people who were . . . — Map (db m7660) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Falls of the Rappahannock River
The Rappahanock River tumbles out of the Virginia Piedmont and drops 25 feet over a distance of one mile. For more than two centuries, industries in this transitional zone used this natural energy. Early settlers brought their corn and wheat to . . . — Map (db m95309) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Ferries and Flats
In 1728, the colonial government established Fredericksburg as far upstream on the Rappahannock River as was navigable. Vessels traveling to and from the Chesapeake Bay and beyond could tie up at the docks there. Workers and slaves loaded tobacco . . . — Map (db m14422) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Field of Battle — The Battle of Fredericksburg
This photograph, taken from the heights to your right-rear, shows the landscape in front of you as it appeared the year after the Battle of Fredericksburg. The town of Fredericksburg sits atop the ridge in the distance; the spire of St. George's . . . — Map (db m8847) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — First Town Hall / Market House
On this site stood Fredericksburg’s first Town Hall / Market House built c. 1763. The building most likely had an arched lower level, brick upper floors and a cupola on the roof. During the early years, the Town Hall did not serve as a governmental . . . — Map (db m1140) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fraternizing at the FordThe Rappahannock River During the Civil War
The Rappahannock River served as a barrier separating the Union and Confederate Armies during the winter of 1862-63. Places where the water level, the river bottom, and the steepness of the banks were favorable for crossings were known as "fords." . . . — Map (db m16537) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — E 46A — Fredericksburg
Captain John Smith was here in 1608; Lederer, the explorer, in 1670. In May 1671 John Buckner and Thomas Royster patented the lease land grant. The town was established in 1727 and lots were laid out. It was named for Frederick, Prince of Wales, . . . — Map (db m1653) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — FredericksburgCivil War Sites
For 18 months Fredericksburg was at the heart of the Civil War. Union and Confederate soldiers camped here, fought here and died here. Today there are many sites within the city. Civil War walking tour information is available free at the . . . — Map (db m9093) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — FredericksburgWhere 100,000 Fell
Because of the immense amount of fighting that occurred here, the Fredericksburg area has been called the vortex of the Civil War. Four major battles - Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness and Spotsylvania Court House - resulting in . . . — Map (db m9096) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Baptist Church
The prominent sanctuary to your right is the Fredericksburg Baptist Church, constructed in 1854-55. When it was built, Princess Anne Street was already developing as the town’s religious and government center. Other churches included St. George’s . . . — Map (db m1141) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Battlefield
Before you looms Marye's Heights, a key point in the two major Civil War battles. At the base of the heights, bordered by a stone wall, lies the Sunken Road. In December 1862 Confederate troops standing in the road repelled repeated Union assaults. . . . — Map (db m25638) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 13, 1862. The blue columns of the Army of the Potomac deployed here in the Canal Ditch valley, along the route of present Kenmore Avenue. Then with drums beating and flags flying, the long battle lines advanced towards Marye’s Heights and . . . — Map (db m2515) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 13, 1862. Watching the battle from the crest of this hill, Confederate commander R. E. Lee remarked: “It is well that war is so terrible – we should grow too fond of it!” In no battle were the Confederates more fortunately . . . — Map (db m4159) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
With Richmond as his objective, Gen. Ambrose Burnside started the Federal Army of the Potomac from Warrenton on November 15, 1862. Forcing a crossing of the Rappahannock on December 11, he occupied Fredericksburg and the plain south of town along . . . — Map (db m4191) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 11, 1862. The peacetime bridges having been destroyed, engineers of Burnside’s Federal Army began laying pontoons across the Rappahannock. Here, overlooking the upper pontoon site, Confederates of Barksdale’s Mississippi Brigade, sheltered . . . — Map (db m5377) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 13, 1862. The Washington Artillery of New Orleans was posted around the Marye House here on Marye's Heights. Col. J. B. Walton, the commanding officer, had his headquarters in the house. This unit and Alexander's Reserve Battalion, which . . . — Map (db m8636) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 13, 1862. On this ridge, called Marye's Heights, blazed the cannon of Col. J.B. Walton's Louisiana battalion, the Washington Artillery. Late in the day, out of ammunition, it yielded the post to Col. E.P. Alexander's Reserve Artillery. Gen. . . . — Map (db m8821) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 13, 1862. About 100 yards to the south Georgia’s Gen. T.R.R. Cobb fell mortally within sight of his mother’s girlhood home. He died at the roadside dwelling of Mrs. Martha Stevens, who remained all during the battle to aid the Confederate . . . — Map (db m93582) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign, December 1862
The Battle of Fredericksburg began on the morning of December 11, 1862, when Confederate sharpshooters opened fire on Federal engineers building a pontoon bridge by which the Union Army of the Potomac planned to cross the Rappahannock River. . . . — Map (db m17795) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg City DockBridges and Biscuits
Why was Fredericksburg important to the Union war effort? The answer lies in logistics. The Union army, numbering more than 100,000 troops, required tons of food, clothing and other supplies to operate, Wagon trains could supply the army for short . . . — Map (db m1131) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg City DockContesting the Crossing
Confederate troops under the command of Gen. William Barksdale were awake and alert hereon the morning of December 11,1862, waiting anxiously for the sun to rise. On the river, unseen in the inky blackness but clearly audible in the night’s . . . — Map (db m1132) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg City DockUnion Artillery on Stafford Heights
Directly ahead of you, across the river, stood George Washington’s boyhood home, Ferry Farm. According to legend, the future president cut down his father’s cherry tree there and threw a coin across the river. The property took its name from a ferry . . . — Map (db m1133) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — N-7 — Fredericksburg Gun Manufactory
The Fredericksburg Gun Manufactory was established by an ordinance passed by Virginia's third revolutionary convention on 17 July 1775. Built on this site soon thereafter by Fielding Lewis and Charles Dick, it was the first such factory in America. . . . — Map (db m1710) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg National Cemetery — The Battle of Fredericksburg
Approximately 20,000 soldiers died in this region during the Civil War, their remains scattered throughout the countryside in shallow, often unmarked, graves. In 1865 Congress established Fredericksburg National Cemetery as a final resting place for . . . — Map (db m8740) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg National Cemetery — The Battle of Fredericksburg
Approximately 20,000 soldiers died in this region during the Civil War, their remains scattered throughout the countryside in shallow, often unmarked, graves. In 1865 Congress established Fredericksburg National Cemetery as a final resting place for . . . — Map (db m8851) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — N-33 — Fredericksburg Normal and Industrial Institute
Due to the efforts of local blacks, Fredericksburg Normal and Industrial Institute (FNII) opened in October 1903 at the Shiloh New Site Baptist Church with about 20 students. In 1906 the board of trustees purchased land and a large farmhouse here, . . . — Map (db m1128) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Roll of Honor
Fredericksburg Roll of Honor 1917 World War 1918 A grateful tribute to all who returned Co. K. 2nd Inf. VA. N. G. 116th Inf 29th Div. 3rd VA Coast Artillery 80th Division Army, Navy, Marine Corps A tearful triumph to those who . . . — Map (db m2516) WM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — 20 — Fredericksburg United Methodist Church
This church sanctuary was built in 1882, the fifth building to be used by the congregation, and the second on this site. Additions were constructed in 1912, 1924, 1951, and 1989. The reverend John Kobler, an early leader who raised funds for the . . . — Map (db m2566) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg's Wharves and Harbor
The dock before you was once the site of a large wharf complex and ferry landing. From the founding of Fredericksburg in 1728, the river played a major role in the transportation of goods such as timber, flour and corn as well as passengers. . . . — Map (db m72187) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — From a Burying Ground to a Park
“On motion made and seconded, resolved unanimously that the new burying ground be enclosed with brick….”      Council Minutes of July 6th, 1824      Robert Lewis, Mayor (Buried in the Masonic Lodge Cemetery) In 1774, St. . . . — Map (db m2700) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — From a Burying Ground to a Park
In 1774, St. George’s Parish purchased the land around you for a cemetery. Following the American Revolution and disestablishment of the Anglican Church in Virginia, the Fredericksburg government appropriated this land for a public burying ground. . . . — Map (db m11430) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Gen. Stonewall Jackson
Gen. Stonewall Jackson, by Gen. Lee’s request, on this corner, planned the Battle of Fredericksburg. Nov. 27, 1862. U.D.C — Map (db m7976) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — George Rogers Clark1752 – 1818
In grateful acknowledgement of the valor and the strategic victories of General George Rogers Clark, Son of Old Virginia, the Paul Revere Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution of Muncie, Indiana, devote this tablet. No hero of the . . . — Map (db m1077) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — George Washington’s Boyhood Home at Ferry Farm
Located directly across the river from where you are standing is the site of the boyhood home of George Washington where he lived from the age of six until he was 20. The farm gets its name from the ferry that once crossed the river here, providing . . . — Map (db m81224) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Germania Mill: Recovering from the Civil War
In front of you stood the Germania Mill, built in 1866 by Myer and Frederick Brulle. Both men were immigrant German confectioners who teamed up after the Civil War to became millers. Fredericksburg’s upper canal powered this enterprise and . . . — Map (db m95319) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Gun from the CSS Virginia
This nine-inch smooth bore “Dahlgren” gun is one of the few remaining artifacts from the CSS Virginia (formerly known as the USS Merrimack). This gun saw action on March 8, 1862 off of Hampton, Virginia when the . . . — Map (db m1127) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Harnessing The River's Power
Native Americans came to the falls of the Rappahannock River because seasonal runs of spawning fish provided food. Europeans settled near the falls to take advantage of the river’s powerful flow. This area reflects more than a . . . — Map (db m95620) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Historic Kenmore
1775 Home of Fielding Lewis and his wife Betty, sister of George Washington. — Map (db m39996) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Historic Old Mill District
A Walking Tour of Fredericksburg’s Historic Old Mill District Fredericksburg’s Historic Old Mill District dates its origins to the earliest settlers along the Rappahannock River. This walking tour takes you through what can be considered the . . . — Map (db m1135) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Historic Old Mill District
A Walking Tour of Fredericksburg’s Historic Old Mill District Fredericksburg’s Historic Old Mill District dates its origins to the earliest settlers along the Rappahannock River. This walking tour takes you through what can be considered the . . . — Map (db m1143) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Hostages
In the summer of 1862, Confederate authorities imprisoned four Union men from Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County. The arrested Unionists were local citizens in good standing, but who refused to renounce their allegiance to the United States. . . . — Map (db m1146) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Hugh Mercer
Sacred to the memory of Hugh Mercer, Brigadier-General in the Army of The United States; He died on the 12th of January, 1777, of the wounds he received on the 3d of same month, near Princetown, in New Jersey, bravely defending the Liberties of . . . — Map (db m14424) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Hydroelectricity Brings Changes to Fredericksburg
Desperate for economic growth, following the Civil War, Fredericksburg embraced the technological innovation of hydroelectricity. In 1887, a local firm converted an old grist mill near the Falmouth Bridge to an electric generating plant. In . . . — Map (db m95320) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Industrial Interlude
The Rappahannock River has been the life blood of Fredericksburg, its velocity feeding five industrial raceways and its flow providing drinking water to three jurisdictions. From around 1770 through 2004, various types of dams diverted part of the . . . — Map (db m103521) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Innis House — The Battle of Fredericksburg
This frame building, known as the Innis (or "Ennis") house, stands as a mute witness to the terrible combat that engulfed this spot. Located along the Confederate line of battle, the small structure was marred by soldier graffiti and perforated by . . . — Map (db m8569) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Irish Brigade
2nd Brigade, 1st Div., II Corps Army of the Potomac While posted here in the early morning of Dec. 13, 1862, the men of the Irish Brigade placed sprigs of boxwood in their caps in honor of their Irish heritage. Later in the day, they took . . . — Map (db m5097) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — John Paul Jones House
This tablet marks the only home in America of John Paul Jones He was appointed a lieutenant in the Continental Navy while still a resident of Virginia — Map (db m14420) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — N-31 — Kenmore
Four blocks west stands Kenmore, built in 1775 by Col. Fielding Lewis for his wife, Betty, sister of George Washington. Near here, between Kenmore and the Rappahannock River, stood Lewis’s warehouses and docks. Kenmore’s intricate plasterwork is the . . . — Map (db m1149) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Kirkland Monument
In memoriam • Richard Rowland Kirkland • Co. G, 2nd South Carolina Volunteers • C.S.A. At the risk of his life, this American soldier of sublime compassion, brought water to his wounded foes at Fredericksburg. The fighting men on both sides . . . — Map (db m86772) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Lease Land
Here Fredericksburg Began the Lease Land John Buckner and Thomas Royston First Settlers May 2nd 1671       A.P.V.A — Map (db m5223) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Lee’s Hill
Battle of Fredericksburg Dec. 12-13, 1862 — Map (db m4161) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — E-43 — Lee’s Position
From this hill (now called Lee’s Hill) a little to the east, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee watched the First Battle of Fredericksburg. As armies prepared for combat, Lee commented that “It is well that war is so terrible—we should grow . . . — Map (db m1654) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Lee's Command Post — The Battle of Fredericksburg
This hill served as General Robert E. Lee's command post during the Battle of Fredericksburg. Before the fighting started, Confederate pioneers cut down trees on the front slope of the hill, giving the Confederate leader a better view of the . . . — Map (db m8861) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Lee's Headquarters — The Battle of Fredericksburg
The hill in front of you, once called Telegraph Hill but now known as Lee's Hill, served as General Robert E. Lee's headquarters during the Battle of Fredericksburg. Throughout the afternoon of December 13, 1862, Lee and his generals watched . . . — Map (db m8858) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Lee's Hill, the commander's lookout
General Robert E. Lee used this hill as a command post during the Battle of Fredericksburg. It has borne his name ever since. Lee’s View from Here Civilians viewing this scene might have focused their attention on the picturesque . . . — Map (db m4162) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Lewis Randolph BallFebruary 15, 1913 – February 2, 1987
Dedicated to the memory of a man who for sixty years worked in Burgess Barber Shop and downtown Fredericksburg. During those years he warmed the hearts of this community with his friendship, ever present smile, and sense of humor. His contributions . . . — Map (db m1147) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Liberty Town
Seth Barton, 1755-1813, fought in the American Revolution, grew wealthy as a shipping merchant, and speculated in real estate. He laid out the subdivision that came to be called Liberty Town in 1812. He is buried at St. George’s Church. . . . — Map (db m33107) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Marye’s Heights
A Northern photographer took this picture of Marye’s Heights in May 1864, setting up his camera in front of “Federal Hill,” a large white house approximately 250 yards to your left-rear. Seventeen months earlier, thousands of Union . . . — Map (db m1066) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Masonic Cemetery
The Masons of Fredericksburg Lodge #4, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, organized as a lodge in 1752. They established this cemetery in 1784 and there are now approximately 270 graves within these grounds. Most are members and family members of . . . — Map (db m34823) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Meditation Rock
Here Mary Ball Washington prayed for the safet of her son and country during the dark days of the Revolution. This tablet was presented by The National Mary Washington Memorial Association (Chartered February 22, 1890 - . . . — Map (db m9194) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Mt. Zion Baptist Church
Toward the end of the nineteenth century, Virginia and other southern states began to legislate social segregation, along racial lines. Additional laws that imposed poll taxes and literacy tests established hurdles to voting along economic lines. . . . — Map (db m33409) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Near Disaster — The Battle of Fredericksburg
On this hill on December 13, 1862, Confederate General Robert E. Lee twice nearly met personal disaster. While firing its 39th round of the day, a 30-pounder Parrott Rifle (like the one in front of you) burst, sending chunks of metal across the . . . — Map (db m8862) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — No OutletCaptain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail
(panel 1) No Outlet Smith explored several Chesapeake rivers hoping to find a water passage to the Pacific Ocean. Instead, he discovered that even the longest rivers reached a point—a fall line—where higher ground and . . . — Map (db m97355) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Odd Fellows Lodge1892
1892Built for Knights of Pythias Lodge #22 & Myrtle Lodge #50 Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Knights of Pythias Lodge until 1961 — Map (db m90972) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Parker's Battery
. . . — Map (db m8850) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Pontoon Bridge Site
Federals crossed here on Pontoon Bridge, Dec 12-13, 1862 — Map (db m5378) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Prisoners of Christ
In Honored Memory of Lewis Craig John Waller, Jr. James Chiles of the county of Spotsylvania Prisoners of Christ Prophets of Spiritual Freedom Who, undaunted by imprisonment preached the Gospel even through the bars of the jail . . . — Map (db m67075) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Rappahannock River Heritage TrailFredericksburg Pathways
(side 1) Fredericksburg’s Lower Canal The falls of the Rappahannock River powered local industries for more than two centuries. Francis Thornton established the first grist mill around 1720. By 1770, James Hunter operated an iron . . . — Map (db m95311) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Rappahannock River Heritage TrailFredericksburg Pathways
(side 1) Fredericksburg’s Lower Canal The falls of the Rappahannock River powered local industries for more than two centuries. Francis Thornton established the first grist mill around 1720. By 1770, James Hunter operated an iron . . . — Map (db m95321) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Ravaged Town
Fredericksburg had enjoyed more than a century of comfortable prosperity by 1860. Although its economic heydey was past, the town’s elegant houses, numerous churches, and shady, tree-lined streets bespoke lingering wealth and refinement. The . . . — Map (db m2577) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Reestablishing a Travel Way
The many culverts along this railway were established during its construction, before the Civil War. Where the land is little altered, these drainage features remain intact and functional. Stormwater flowing off of new roads, rooftops, and parking . . . — Map (db m95329) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Religious Liberty
(Front) From a meeting in Fredericksburg, January 3-17, 1777, of a Committee of Revisors appointed by the General Assembly of Virginia, composed of Thomas Jefferson, George Mason, Edmund Pendleton, George Wythe and Thomas Ludwell Lee to . . . — Map (db m1078) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Rising Sun Tavern
Built about 1760 by Charles, the youngest brother of George Washington. Owned by the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities. — Map (db m37006) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Rocky Lane
Rocky Lane leading to Washington Ferry. Center pontoon bridge was located near foot of lane (Battle of Fredericksburg) December 11 - 16, 1862. — Map (db m1130) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Second Town Hall / Market House
The building in front of you is the Town Hall / Market House. Completed in 1816, it served as Fredericksburg’s governmental center until 1982, making it the second oldest continuously used town hall in the American south. The building was used in . . . — Map (db m1125) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Seeking Civil Rights
On July 2, 1960, minority citizens of Fredericksburg began a protest to effect social and political change through direct action. A larger Civil Rights Movement had begun in earnest following the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down as . . . — Map (db m1059) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Seeking CoverBattle of Fredericksburg
For Union soldiers who attacked Marye's Heights, the open plain in front of you offered just two sources of cover: the brick Stratton house, visible just two blocks ahead on the left side of the street, and the swale, a slight drop in the landscape . . . — Map (db m25643) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Shiloh Baptist Cemetery1882
Burial grounds of Shiloh Baptist (Old Site & New Site) and Mount Zion Churches. Joseph F. Walker and Jason C. Grant are buried here. The separate marker, above this one, states: Gates presented by Ever Ready Club, Shiloh, Old Site . . . — Map (db m92552) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Shiloh Baptist Church (New Site)
In 1886, the African Baptist Church, on Sophia Street, sustained serious flood damage. The congregation purchased a new site on higher ground, but a clouded deed delayed construction. In the interim, approximately half of the members decided to . . . — Map (db m732) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site)
Former slaves as well as free blacks realized that education was critical to African-American aspirations. Immediately after the Civil War, the Shiloh Baptist Church organized a school for black students. The Freedmen’s Bureau supported this effort, . . . — Map (db m1081) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Site of Barton House
Site of Barton House, a beautiful Georgian style structure built in 1785 by James Maury, whom George Washington appointed as the first American ambassador to England. Guests in the Barton House included such notables as General Robert E. Lee and . . . — Map (db m14426) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Spanish War Veterans
In memory of our comrades who encamped on this site prior to the campaign in Cuba during the War with Spain 1898–1899. — Map (db m1712) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Stating Inalienable Rights
On October 7, 1776, three months after the Continental Congress had adopted the Declaration of Independence, the Virginia Assembly held its first session, in Williamsburg. The Assembly appointed Thomas Jefferson and four delegates to a Committee of . . . — Map (db m1061) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Stephens Family Cemetery — The Battle of Fredericksburg
Buried here are eight members of the Innis, Mazeen, and Stephens families, including the most famous of them all: Martha Stephens. Local children knew Martha Stephens as "Granny." They also remembered her ever-present apron, the pipe often clenched . . . — Map (db m8568) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Sunken RoadBattle of Chancellorsville
This photograph was taken shortly after the Confederates in the foreground were killed on May 3, 1863. This graphic depiction of the human debris of battle is one of the most revealing post-battle photos from the Civil War years, because it was . . . — Map (db m93583) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Sunken Road Walking Trail — The Battle of Fredericksburg
On December 13, 1862, Union troops poured out of Fredericksburg to attack Confederate forces behind the town. The heaviest blows fell here at Marye's Heights. For eight hours Union troops repeatedly charged the heights only to be slaughtered by the . . . — Map (db m8830) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The “Demon of Destruction”
Had the demon of destruction held an orgie in the town, had all the imps of hell been called together and turned loose upon the city, it could scarcely have been more blasted, ruined and desecrated than when left by the Yankee army.” . . . — Map (db m2576) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Barton Street Potter's Field
This marker commemorates the indigent and unknown once interred on this site. Provided by the City in 1816 and once called the Colored Cemetery, it was the final resting place for former slaves and free blacks. Long barren and unused, in 1920 this . . . — Map (db m51282) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Battle of Fredericksburg from Lee's Hill, December, 1862
"This point, densely wooded when first chosen, became the most important, perhaps, in the entire scene as the position affording the best view of all the field...." Brig. Gen. W.M. Pendleton, Lee's Chief of Artillery — Map (db m85952) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Booth House"Bricklea" — circa 1847
American Gothic ...attributed to architect James Renwick who designed the Fredericksburg Courthouse. When built this middle class property comprised 1/4 of the present city block and contained enough pasture for one COW. House had no indoor . . . — Map (db m76507) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Canal Ditch
The post-Civil War street in front of you, Kenmore Avenue, covers a wartime millrace or canal ditch. On December 13, 1862, the ditch became a maddening obstacle to Union soldiers advancing against Marye’s Heights. Five feet deep, 15 feet wide, and . . . — Map (db m1067) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Canal Ditch: Battlefield Obstacle
The Rappahannock Canal fed lesser waterways that powered a variety of small industries. One of these secondary drainages branched off from the main canal in this area and became an obstacle to Federal troops during the 1862 battle of . . . — Map (db m1070) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Canal Ditch: Battlefield Obstacle
“We were subject to fire from the canal all day.” —A Mississippi soldier describing his experience on December 14, 1862, the day after the battle of Fredericksburg. The Union army would withdraw that night. On December . . . — Map (db m95315) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Confederate Line — The Battle of Fredericksburg
You are now standing beside the Sunken Road, part of a heavily used 19th-century road system that linked Washington, D.C. and Richmond. In 1862, Confederate riflemen fired from the road upon line after line of Union troops advancing across open . . . — Map (db m8510) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Corporation Burying Groundand other Fredericksburg Cemeteries
The park around you was once known as the Corporation Burying Ground. Burials occurred here from 1787 through 1853 and included Dr. Charles Mortimer, who had been Mary Washington's personal physician. He also served as Fredericksburg's first mayor, . . . — Map (db m14429) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Courthouse
With the arrival of the Union army in the Spring of 1862, Fredericksburg-area slaves by the hundreds fled to freedom. To house the refugees, the Union army transformed the basement of the city courthouse (in front of you) into a temporary barracks. . . . — Map (db m2567) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Ebert House and Store — The Battle of Fredericksburg
You could smell the gingerbread and candy when you went into the store. It was utterly quiet, the only noise was the ticking of a clock...and an elderly lady knitting and rocking. A local resident On this corner stood the home of the Ebert . . . — Map (db m8640) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac
To commemorate the valor of the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac, and in loving memory of its heroic dead this monument has been erected by Major General Daniel Butterfield, U.S.V., its commander on this field December 13th 1862. . . . — Map (db m1677) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Heights at Smith RunMay 4, 1863
From May 1-3, 1863 Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson fought a powerful federal army to a standstill at Chancellorsville, while Major General Jubal A. Early's division confronted the Union 6th Corps at Fredericksburg. On May 4th, following . . . — Map (db m76686) HM WM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Killing Fields — The Battle of Fredericksburg
This view, taken a mile behind you, shows the vast open space in front of Marye's Heights only months after the December 1862 battle. Union troops crossed the plain between the town (in the foreground) and Marye's Heights. Some attackers advanced to . . . — Map (db m8663) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Lewis Store
1749 • Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. • Restoration in 2002. Councilor John Lewis (1694-1754) of Warner Hall in Gloucester County purchased 406 ac. at Fredericksburg’s northern edge in 1742 and soon began a mercantile operation . . . — Map (db m1148) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Market Square
The space you are standing in is historic Market Square. When Fredericksburg was created in 1728, seven leading landowners in Spotsylvania County were appointed to design the town. The men set aside this block for use by the Anglican Church and the . . . — Map (db m1124) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Middle Passage
If the Atlantic were to dry up, it would reveal a scattered pathway of human bones, African bones marking the various routes of the Middle Passage. -Dr. John Henrik Clarke (1915-1998) From 1502 to 1860, the trans-Atlantic slave trade . . . — Map (db m97364) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Original Wall — The Battle of Fredericksburg
Standing here you can clearly see how the Sunken Road got its name. Cut into the base of Marye's Heights, the roadbed sits several feet below the grade of the surrounding hill slope. Stone retaining walls on either side of the road hold the banks in . . . — Map (db m8638) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Pioneers
“My army is as much stronger for these new entrenchments as if I had received reinforcements of 20,000 men.” - R.E. Lee, Decenber 14, 1862 Preparing Breastworks In December, 1862, the Confederates had no organized . . . — Map (db m4180) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Railway, With Tracks and Without
In 1877, the Fredericksburg and Gordonsville Rail Road began operations, with narrow gauge tracks connecting to established railways running through Fredericksburg and Orange. A series of companies tried to make this railroad profitable, . . . — Map (db m95326) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Rappahannock River Runs Free Once More
The breaching of the Embrey Dam has allowed the unobstructed migration of fish upstream to their natural spawning grounds. The dam’s demolition has also improved the habitats of a wide variety of wildlife on the Rappahannock River. It also provides . . . — Map (db m95308) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Rise & Fall of the Rappahannock Navigation System
Comprised of 47 locks, 20 dams, and 15 miles of canals, the Rappahannock Navigation System struggled from its beginnings. After suffering numerous construction delays due to financial problems, the heyday of canal commerce on the Rappahannock was . . . — Map (db m16541) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Second Battle of FredericksburgChancellorsville Campaign May 3, 1863
General Lee conferred with some of his officers here at the start of the Chancellorsville Campaign. A few days later, Union soldiers overran Lee’s Hill. Report on the action at Lee’s Hill by Colonel Henry Coalter Cabell commanding artillery . . . — Map (db m4182) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Second Battle of Fredericksburg
Five months after the Battle of Fredericksburg the Union army finally captured Marye's Heights. On May 5, 1863, General John Sedgwick's Sixth Corps streamed out of Fredericksburg to attack this ridge. Twice Confederates on the Sunken Road repulsed . . . — Map (db m8848) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — N-31-a — The Sentry Box
The Sentry Box (ca. 1786) is an elegant specimen of late~Georgian~style architecture. Brig. Gen. George Weedon of the Continental Army, later mayor of Fredericksburg, built the house and named it to reflect his military career. Weedon's wife, . . . — Map (db m5095) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Slave Ship Othello
Virginia Fredericksburg Augt 25th 1773 Messrs. Samuel &William Vernon Gentlemen You will by this opportunity be advised by Capt. Jno. Duncan of his Arrival here, & valuing himself on Col. John Thornton for his Services in disposal . . . — Map (db m97371) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Stephens House — The Battle of Fredericksburg
The foundation outlined before you marks the wartime home of Edward and Martha Stephens. On December 13, 1862, the house was caught in the vortex of Union attacks against the Sunken Road. Confederate sharpshooters fired from the house windows and . . . — Map (db m8550) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Sunken Road — The Battle of Fredericksburg
For 130 years, this was a road like thousands of others. First called the County Road, then Telegraph Road, it carried farmer's wagons into Fredericksburg or townsfolk to visit relatives in the country. During the 1830s an adjacent landowner built . . . — Map (db m8854) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Union Attacks Begin — The Battle of Fredericksburg
In 1862 the ground in front of you was an open plain stretching from here to the outskirts of Fredericksburg, one-half mile away. As Union troops left the town to attack Marye's Heights, they had to break ranks to cross a canal ditch, then knock . . . — Map (db m8502) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Vermont Brigade Counterattacks
On May 4, 1863, Colonel Lewis A. Grant's brigade of Vermont regiments held the ridge to your right front. Late in the day, Brigadier Generals Harry T. Hays and Robert Hoke launched their Louisiana and North Carolina brigades against a Union line at . . . — Map (db m82932) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Walker Landram House
To your left front is a ravine that leads up from Hazel Run to what was once the 230-acre farmstead of Walker Landram. In 1854, he had sold 6.5 acres on the southern edge of his farm to the railway company, where you are now standing. When the Civil . . . — Map (db m95324) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — The Willis Hill Buildings — The Battle of Fredericksburg
In December 1862 Confederate artillery on this hill rained shot and shell on attacking Union soldiers advancing out of Fredericksburg. Next to the guns was a small brick building, one of three that then occupied this part of the heights. "The little . . . — Map (db m8712) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Thomas R. R. Cobb — The Battle of Fredericksburg
The monument across the road marks the spot where General Thomas R. R. Cobb suffered a mortal wound. A brilliant Constitutional lawyer prior to the war, he left his practice to take up arms for the South. At Fredericksburg Cobb fought his first . . . — Map (db m8522) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — To the Confederate Dead
(Text of tablet placed in 1992):In honor of Confederate Soldiers who died in Fredericksburg Oct 1861 through Mar 1862 and buried in Barton St. Cemetery No record of reinterment when site reused in 1920 Alabama 14th Infantry- Archer . . . — Map (db m14425) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Veterans of Foreign Wars Eternal Flame
This monument stands forever a memorial and symbol of undying love and devotion in memory of the men from this city and surrounding areas who fought for liberty and freedom from oppression in the wars of this, their Country, and whose supreme . . . — Map (db m4618) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Virginia Central Railway Trail
Along the VCR In 1853, a group of investors incorporated and began to grade a railway route from Fredericksburg to Orange Court House, 37 miles to the west. In Orange, this new railway would connect with a rail line to Gordonsville, . . . — Map (db m95322) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Virginia Central Railway Trail
Along the VCR In 1853, a group of investors incorporated and began to grade a railway route from Fredericksburg to Orange Court House, 37 miles to the west. In Orange, this new railway would connect with a rail line to Gordonsville, . . . — Map (db m95328) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — War Comes to Fredericksburg
“The General punishes most severely any [soldier] caught in the most trivial act. He says [we must] show the Southern People we will act with true Yankee Hospitality even to the worst treasonable communities.” . . . — Map (db m2584) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Water Powered Industries
In 1855, the Fredericksburg Water Power Company adapted the Rappahannock Company’s navigation canal to be an industrial power canal. The canal turning basin became a mill pond and several raceways soon branched off to power the Germania Flour Mill . . . — Map (db m95317) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Weedon’s Tavern
Constructed shortly after Fredericksburg’s founding in 1728, the tavern across the intersection became a popular gathering place under the proprietorship of its first owner, John Gordon, and then of his son-in-law, George Weedon. George Washington . . . — Map (db m1060) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Welcome to Fredericksburg, VaStone Tools to Seltzer Bottles
Commuters and rail passengers hurry to their trains over asphalt paving that is only the most recent layer in Fredericksburg's history. These travelers cross over prehistoric work sites, eighteenth-century shops and dwellings, a Civil War . . . — Map (db m14419) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Willis Hill Cemetery — The Battle of Fredericksburg
"There is a private cemetery on the crest, surrounded by a brick wall. Burnside's artillery had not spared it. I looked over the wall, which was badly smashed in places, and saw the overthrown monuments and broken tombstones lying on the . . . — Map (db m8718) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — EM-3 — 23rd USCT At the Alrich Farm
The first combat in the Civil War between United States Colored Troops and Confederates north of the James River occurred near here. On 15 May 1864, Confederate Brig. Gen. Thomas Rosser pushed forward a cavalry detachment along Catharpin Road . . . — Map (db m75706) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — A Southern Memorial
The cleared vista to the left offers a framed view of a 30-foot square, 23-foot high pyramid. It marks the left of the Northern penetration into Confederate lines on Dec. 13, 1862. Federal troops under Gen. George Meade took advantage of an . . . — Map (db m4090) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Battle of FredericksburgThe Slaughter Pen
On December 13, 1862, Union and Confederate troops clashed here, on muddy fields dubbed the "Slaughter Pen." Union Gen. William B. Franklin had 65,000 troops, but employed only two divisions, numbering 8,000 men, under Generals George G. Meade and . . . — Map (db m21106) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Battle of FredericksburgWinter War on the Rappahannock
In November 1862, Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside led his 115,000-man army southward toward Richmond, the Confederate capital. Delayed by tardy pontoon boats, Burnside was slow to cross the Rappahannock River, which allowed Confederate Gen. Robert E. . . . — Map (db m21109) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Bernard's Cabin Trail
This mile-long trail leads to the site of Bernard’s Cabins. On the eve of the Civil War, these cabins (now gone) were home to as many as thirty-five slaves. During the Battle of Fredericksburg, the Confederates turned the terrain surrounding the . . . — Map (db m5619) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Bernard's CabinsThe Battle of Fredericksburg
On this knoll stood Bernard's Cabins, a small community that in 1860 was home to about three dozen slaves. The complex consisted of three two-room cabins, a stone-lined well, and perhaps two additional buildings. This was only one of several such . . . — Map (db m7973) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — E-46 — Colonial Fort
The Virginia General Assembly authorized the construction of a fort built nearby along the Rappahannock River in 1676. It served as a defensive fortification for settlers of European descent on the frontier when periodic conflicts occurred between . . . — Map (db m1655) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Confederate EarthworksThe Battle of Fredericksburg
Twisting through the woods one hundred yards ahead of you are two well-preserved lines of earthworks constructed by Confederate forces in the winter of 1862-1863. General Robert E. Lee had ordered his troops to build the trenches in anticipation of . . . — Map (db m19313) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — E-42 — Cox House
Across the road to the northeast stood the Cox House, also known as the Wiatt House. In December 1862, Confederate Maj. Gen. Lafayette McLaws’s division used it as a hospital, and there on 13 December, Brig. Gen. Thomas R. R. Cobb died from wounds . . . — Map (db m1713) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Dead Horse HillThe Battle of Fredericksburg
The crescent-shaped earthworks in front of you protected the 14 guns of Lieutenant Colonel Reuben Lindsey Walker's artillery battalion, which held this position on December 13, 1862. Prior to the assault of Union infantry, artillery blanketed this . . . — Map (db m21901) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Death of Maxcy Gregg
General Maxcy Gregg fell mortally wounded near this spot on December 13, 1862. Fiery and uncompromising on the issues of slavery and states’ rights, the South Carolina lawyer had been an early and ardent proponent of secession. When war came, Gregg, . . . — Map (db m4092) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Engines of DestructionThe Battle of Fredericksburg
On December 13, 1862, nine Confederate cannon on this knoll helped repulse one of two major Union attacks against Jackson's front. At noon, Union infantry crashed into the Confederate infantry line to your right-front. Captain Greenlee Davidson's . . . — Map (db m7975) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — E-84 — Fort Hood
In November 1862, Confederate forces under Maj. Gen. John Bell Hood constructed this fort a half mile northeast on the Rappahannock River in an effort to prevent Union gunboats from ascending the river toward Fredericksburg. Four rifled guns of . . . — Map (db m4123) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 13, 1862. In these gunpits stood 14 cannon of Walker’s Artillery Battalion, guarding the right of the Confederate line. While the youthful Maj. John Pelham’s light and mobile horse artillery, about a mile to the front, daringly challenged . . . — Map (db m4087) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 13, 1862. “Lee’s War Horse,” Longstreet, easily beat off repeated attacks against Marye’s Heights to the northward. Meanwhile, here in the Hamilton’s Crossing sector “Stonewall” Jackson had more trouble, but his . . . — Map (db m4088) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 13, 1862. Here in the Lansdowne Valley Longstreet’s right flank joined with “Stonewall” Jackson’s left. Confederate infantry was deployed on the valley floor and cannon rimmed the hills behind, forming a deep pocket in the . . . — Map (db m4116) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 13, 1862. Here, on the wood’s edge facing the fields of the Lansdowne Valley, Gen. George Pickett’s 9,000 men, including soldiers from Fredericksburg, held a vital part of Lee’s line. The enemy did not attack Pickett’s Division and the men . . . — Map (db m4124) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 13, 1862. This highway, the Old Richmond Stage Road, here passes wartime Smithfield, now the Fredericksburg Country Club. Out of the ravine alongside the present golf links (your left front), Meade’s Division emerged to form lines of battle . . . — Map (db m5522) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Fredericksburg Campaign
December 13, 1862. This is Hamilton's Crossing, the crossing of the Old Mine Road over the Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railroad. Since the railroad was threatened from here to Fredericksburg by long range Federal cannon, Hamilton's . . . — Map (db m8865) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — George Washington: Soldier and Virginia Planter
(Front): George Washington: Soldier George Washington gained his first military experience during the French and Indian Wars where his bravery and leadership made him a hero. When discord between the American colonies and the British . . . — Map (db m14186) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — George Washington: Statesman and Public Servant
(Front): George Washington: Statesman Following the Treaty of Paris that guaranteed American independence from Great Britain in 1783, Washington became an influential mover in the steps leading to the Constitutional Convention at . . . — Map (db m14184) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — George Washington: Surveyor and Family Man
(Front): George Washington: Surveyor George Washington loved mathematics, a passion he put to work when he learned to survey land, a useful trade in colonial America. At the age of 15, his first surveying job was to map his brother's . . . — Map (db m14185) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Hamilton's Crossing
This trail leads 0.2 miles to Hamilton’s Crossing on the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad. Named for Captain George Hamilton whos home, “Forest Hill,” once stood on a nearby knoll. Hamilton’s Crossing marks the intersection . . . — Map (db m4086) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Fredericksburg — Hamilton's CrossingThe Battle of Fredericksburg
This footpath leads to the site of Hamilton's Crossing, a critical supply base for Confederate troops camped near Fredericksburg during the winter of 1862-63. Prior to the Civil War, Hamilton's Crossing had been merely a flag-stop on the Richmond, . . . — Map (db m21797) HM

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