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Jacksonboro, South Carolina Historical Markers

 
Battle Of Parker's Ferry Marker image, Touch for more information
By Mike Stroud, 2008
Battle Of Parker's Ferry Marker
South Carolina (Colleton County), Jacksonboro — 15-12 — Battle Of Parker's Ferry
Sent to intercept a raid by 540 Hessians, British, and Tories, General Francis Marion with a force of 400 men on August 30, 1781 set up an ambuscade along this road about 1 mile from the ferry. The enemy advancing along the narrow causeway were . . . — Map (db m7918) HM
South Carolina (Colleton County), Jacksonboro — 15-8 — Bethel Presbyterian Church
Founded on this site in 1728 by the Reverend Archibald Stobo, Bethel or Pon Pon Church served a large Presbyterian congregation until replaced by Bethel Presbyterian Church in nearby town of Walterboro early in the nineteenth century. The original . . . — Map (db m7880) HM
South Carolina (Colleton County), Jacksonboro — Colonel Issac Hayne
As a grateful and reverential tribute to A noble martyr in behalf of liberty The State Of South Carolina Has erected this memorial to Colonel Issac Hayne who was captured near here by the British July 6, 1781, and in violation . . . — Map (db m8790) HM
South Carolina (Colleton County), Jacksonboro — Fateful Choices - The Hanging Of Isaac Hayne
Isaac Hayne tried to spend the rest of the Revolutionary War in peace after the British captured Charleston in 1780. Although he had supported independence, Hayne accepted a parole - a promise to remain neutral - in exchange for his freedom. But the . . . — Map (db m8010) HM
South Carolina (Colleton County), Jacksonboro — 15-6 — Martyr Of The Revolution / Hayne Hall
Martyr Of The Revolution When Loyalists soldiers attacked the camp of Col. Isaac Hayne's S.C. malitia about 5 mi. W on July 7, 1781, they captured Hayne. He was soon condemned as a traitor because he had previously declared allegiance to . . . — Map (db m8001) HM
South Carolina (Colleton County), Jacksonboro — 15-1 — Old Jacksonborough
Founded about 1735 on lands granted John Jackson in 1701; county seat of Colleton District from 1799 to 1822. Provisional capital of state while Charleston was under siege in the closing months of the American Revolution. First South Carolina . . . — Map (db m8660) HM
South Carolina (Colleton County), Jacksonboro — 15-14 — Pon Pon Chapel
On Parker's Ferry Road one mile northeast of here are the ruins of Pon Pon Chapel of Ease, established in 1725 by an Act of the General Assembly after the Yemassee War aborted plans for St. Bartholomew's Parish Church. John Wesley preached here in . . . — Map (db m7073) HM
South Carolina (Colleton County), Jacksonboro — Pon Pon ChapelServing the Community for Many Years
Here on the old stage coach road connecting Charleston to Savannah, the Anglican Pon Pon Chapel of Ease served the Jacksonborough community for many years. The parish of St. Bartholomew's was established in 1706, however its first . . . — Map (db m66489) HM
South Carolina (Colleton County), Jacksonboro — Ruins of Pon Pon Chapel of EaseSt. Bartholomew’s Parish
1706 Parish Established Rev. Nathaniel Osborn, Missionary of the S.P.G. arrived 1715 Parish devastated by Yemassee, Indians 1725 Act of General Assembly provided for a Chapel of Ease here to be used as a Parish Church until one should be built . . . — Map (db m7120) HM
South Carolina (Colleton County), Jacksonboro — The Burial Site of Captain John Herbert Dent
This U.S. Naval officer was born in Maryland in 1782 and died at his plantation in St. Bartholomew's Parish, S.C. in 1823. He served as acting captain of the frigate "Constitution" in 1804 during the war with Tripoli, and was senior officer . . . — Map (db m7881) HM

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