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Manassas, Virginia Historical Markers

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Strategic Crossing Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. Makali Bruton, September 4, 2015
Strategic Crossing Marker
Virginia (Fairfax County), Manassas — Strategic CrossingFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 - 6 a.m.
Originally constructed in 1825, the Stone Bridge carried the Warrenton Turnpike across Bull Run. Its ability to carry traffic across the steep-sided stream, even at times of high water, gave the bridge a key role in the Civil War. Both sides . . . — Map (db m94609) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Manassas — Union RetreatSecond Battle of Manassas - Day Three — August 30, 1862 - 9 p.m.
Under cover of darkness, the defeated Union army withdrew toward Centreville, four miles to the east. The troops crossed Bull Run on a makeshift wooden span, constructed several months earlier by Union engineers using the remaining bridge abutments. . . . — Map (db m88720) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Battle of Bull Run BridgeLiberia — Second Manassas Campaign
In Aug. 1862, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee ordered Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson from the Rappahannock River to keep Gen. John Pope’s and Gen. George B. McClellan’s armies from uniting. Jackson marched on Aug. 25, and Lee followed . . . — Map (db m13286) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Burning of Manassas
Manassas Junction was twice destroyed by fire in the Civil War and badly damaged by fires in 1905 and 1911. The Confederates burned their base here in March 1862 to avoid seizure by the Federals and Stonewall Jackson destroyed the Federal base in . . . — Map (db m2456) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Clover Hill Farm
In 1770 Patrick Hamrick sold this land to Rutt Johnson who used the land for crops and fruit trees and later added livestock. This property became known as CLOVER HILL FARM prior to 1852. During the Civil War the Johnson family left the area. When . . . — Map (db m40212) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Confederate Cemetery
Dedicated by the Ladies Memorial Association of Manassas, on August 30, 1889, to the heroes of Virginia and her sister states, who yielded their lives on July 18 & 21, 1861 & August 28, 29 & 30, 1862, in defense of the Confederate cause. — Map (db m19815) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Defenses of Manassas
In this vicinity stood a number of small earthworks erected by the Confederates in the summer of 1861 to protect the railroad and their army’s base here. The Confederates evacuated Manassas in March, 1862, destroying what militarily useful material . . . — Map (db m2470) HM
Virginia, Manassas — CL-5 — Fifth Prince William County Courthouse
The city of Manassas originated in 1852 at the junction of the Manassas Gap and the Orange & Alexandria railroads. During the Civil War the junction’s strategic significance led to two important battles nearby. After the war, as the community grew, . . . — Map (db m778) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Harry J. Parrish
Harry J. Parrish—The Man. Harry Jacob Parrish was born February 22, 1922 and has made Manassas his lifelong home. He attended Prince William county schools, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Wofford college, and schools of the US Air Force. . . . — Map (db m702) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Katie Hooe House
This structure reputedly is the oldest dwelling in Manassas. Part of the building is of log and is supposed to have been built before the Civil War. Most of the original houses of the hamlet of Tudor Hall—subsequently Manassas, were in the . . . — Map (db m2415) HM
Virginia, Manassas — CL-4 — Manassas
According to tradition the name Manassas was derived either from an Indian source or from Manasseh, a Jewish innkeeper at Manassas Gap (35 miles west). The community originated in 1852 at the junction of the Manassas Gap and Orange & Alexandria . . . — Map (db m23697) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1825Liberia Plantation — Plantation & Civil War Headquarters
Built by the Weir family in 1825, this Federal-style home is one of the few pre-Civil War dwellings that remains in the area. Once a prosperous 2,000-acre plantation, Liberia had a general store, a post office, and a school, and boasted a successful . . . — Map (db m28309) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1850Katie Hooe House & Tudor Hall — A New Village
The Kate Hooe House at 8920 Quarry Road is the only known building in the historic district believed to date from the pre-Civil War period, when Manassas was a small village at the junction of two railroad lines. This wood frame house contains a . . . — Map (db m23798) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1862Civil War Railroad Turntable & Repair Shop — Railroad Central to War
In this vicinity stood the Civil War era Orange & Alexandria Railroad repair shops. Just east of Manassas City Hall stood the sidings and turntable of the railroad, used to reverse the direction of a train. When the Confederates evacuated the . . . — Map (db m23825) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1890 - 1900sRailroad Work's Homes Add Variety to City Architecture — A Prosperous Town
After the county seat moved to Manassas in 1892, and the Southern Railway continued to prosper, the area outside the core downtown and along the railroad track experienced a building boom. The new clapboard homes ranged in style from Italianate, . . . — Map (db m23797) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1892Annaburg Manor — Grand Summer Home
Prussian-born Robert Portner, Alexandria brewer and businessman, built Annaburg in 1892 as his show place summer home and escape from the city. It became the center of beauty and interest with 35 rooms, electricity, and reportedly, one of the first . . . — Map (db m28356) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1900A Flurry of Construction — Speiden Leaves Mark on Town
As Manassas grew and prospered in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the historic district filled with prominent homes, churches, and commercial buildings. The town had two banks and two newspapers. Telephone service began in 1895. Albert . . . — Map (db m23826) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1905 - The Great FireCourage & Determination Save Town
During the cold winter night of December 5, 1905, a smoldering fire began in Blossom's Alley across the tracks from the train depot. It soon raged through the young town of Manassas, destroying 35 homes, the post office, and business bordered by . . . — Map (db m23773) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1906Rebuilding Manassas — A Spirit of Optimism
When the Civil War ended, newcomers and residents rebuilt the burned and devastated landscape around this vital railroad junction. The resulting town of Manassas, incorporated in 1873, quickly became the transportation and commercial hub of Prince . . . — Map (db m23828) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Manassas Presbyterian Church
Built in 1875, this building served the congregation for 100 years. Built of locally quarried red sandstone, the church had original Tiffany windows which were removed to the new church. The church was shown in My Son John, a movie partially . . . — Map (db m2471) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortA Civil War Redoubt — The Manassas Museum System
This 11-acre historic park, part of the Manassas Museum System, contains one of only two surviving Civil War fortifications in the City of Manassas. The earthwork was built by Confederate troops in the Spring of 1861 as part of the Manassas Junction . . . — Map (db m2366) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortThe People and the Land — The Manassas Museum System
American Indians lived on the land long before white settlers and slaves came to this area. Living in nomadic hunter-gatherer groups, people called the Dogues and the Mannahoacs roamed the Northern Virginia Piedmont region. Archaeological evidence . . . — Map (db m2386) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortUnearthing the Past — The Manassas Museum System
Archeology is the detective work of history. Evidence recovered from the soil often provides valuable clues for learning how people lived, worked, and died, especially when documentary sources are scarce. Excavations were conducted at the Hooe . . . — Map (db m2393) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortMonster Manassas - How Strong a Stronghold? — The Manassas Museum System
The Mayfield earthwork, known in military engineering terms as a redoubt, was a circle of raised earth some 200 feet in diameter. It may have included a retaining wall of timbers and brush, and planks to support artillery. While capable of . . . — Map (db m2396) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortFirepower — The Manassas Museum System
Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard, commander of the troops defending Manassas, had been one of the pre-war U.S. Army's outstanding artillerists. Fearing an imminent Union attack, he worked feverishly to obtain cannons for the fortifications and experienced . . . — Map (db m2405) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortQuaker Guns — The Manassas Museum System
Some of the Confederate cannons placed at Manassas and nearby Centreville were for show only. These non-functioning cannon were intended to deceive Union soldiers who might turn their telescopes on the earthworks: “This was nothing other . . . — Map (db m2408) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortFortifying the Junction — The Manassas Museum System
Following Virginia’s decision to secede from the Union in in April 1861, Southern troops began arriving here at the small village of Tudor Hall, which soon came to be known as Manassas Junction. This place, where the Orange & Alexandria and Manassas . . . — Map (db m41503) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortThe Changing Fortunes of War — The Manassas Museum System
After the First Battle of Manassas on June 21, 1861, Confederate forces continued to hold Manassas Junction until March 1862. They evacuated Manassas and moved south in order to counter Union Gen. George B. McClellan’s plans to attack Richmond. . . . — Map (db m41504) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War FortManning the Fort — The Manassas Museum System
The life of Civil War soldiers in camp was one of boredom, fear, mischief, disease and even death. Thousands of young men, many of whom had never before left their family farms or urban neighborhoods, were crowded into the makeshift camps. Disease . . . — Map (db m41505) HM
Virginia, Manassas — CL-6 — Old Bennett School
In 1908 the General Assembly authorized ten agricultural high schools, one in each congressional district. The first such school was built in Manassas in 1908-1909 and named for Dr. Maitland C. Bennett, who donated the land. During construction, . . . — Map (db m772) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Opera House
Built circa 1907. Served as the main community center for Manassas until the mid 1930s. It later was used by the Manassas Journal newspaper. — Map (db m2472) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Peace JubileeFriendship and Reconciliation
In July, 1911, an amazing event took place here at Manassas, Virginia. The Manassas National Jubilee of Peace brought together Union and Confederate veterans fifty years after the first major battle of the Civil War. For the first time, veterans of . . . — Map (db m2469) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Site of Manassas Junction
One mile west was the junction of the Orange and Alexandria and Manassas Gap Railroad lines. The point became known as Manassas Junction. During the Civil War both sides used the area as a supply base. The site of the first depot was probably about . . . — Map (db m700) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Steam Locomotive Tire Fire Alarm – 1909
One of the challenges for volunteer fire departments is how to alert their members to a fire. In July 1909, the Town of Manassas authorized Mr. J. I. Randall, the first town Fire Chief, to purchase three locomotive tires to be suspended in frames in . . . — Map (db m392) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Steam Locomotive Tire Fire Alarm – 1909
One of the challenges for volunteer fire departments is how to alert their members to a fire. In July 1909, the Town of Manassas authorized Mr. J. I. Randall, the first town Fire Chief, to purchase three locomotive tires to be suspended in frames in . . . — Map (db m2417) HM
Virginia, Manassas — The Manassas MuseumDefending the Junction — First and Second Manassas Campaigns
During the 1850s two railroad lines, the Orange & Alexandria and the Manassas Gap, intersected at a small Prince William County village that became known as Manassas Junction. In 1861 more than 20,000 Confederate troops from across the South . . . — Map (db m41506) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasPrelude to First Manassas
(Preface): During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military . . . — Map (db m2453) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasWorld’s First Military Railroad
(Preface): During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and Confederacy as a supply depot and for military . . . — Map (db m2459) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasWalking and Driving Tours
The Manassas Museum System invites you to take walking and driving tours of the city’s historic Civil War sites. This map shows the locations of the sites featured on both tours. Copies of the map may be obtained inside the museum to take with you. . . . — Map (db m2462) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas“On to Richmond!”
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2464) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasJackson’s Daring Raid
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2465) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasThe Curious Descend on Manassas for Curios
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2466) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas“The Sickness is Upon Us”
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2467) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Wartime ManassasConfederates Withdraw to Richmond
During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . — Map (db m2468) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — "...Like a Stone Wall" — First Battle of Manassas
On the brow of the hill Brig. Gen. Bernard Bee was desperately trying to rally his men when he caught sight of Thomas J. Jackson with fresh troops here at the edge of the pine thicket. "Look!" Bee shouted. "There stands Jackson like a stone wall! . . . — Map (db m8304) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — "The Very Vortex of Hell"Second Battle of Manassas — Day Three - August 30, 1862 - 4:15 p.m.
From their position atop this ridge, the soldiers of the 5th New York Infantry listened to the crash of battle. It appeared the regiment had escaped combat that day. Most of the fighting raged one mile to the north near Deep Cut. Around 4 p.m. an . . . — Map (db m58858) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — “The Unfinished Railroad”
These cuts and fills are what remain of the Independent Line of the Manassas Gap Railroad. The Independent Line was constructed in the mid-1850s to connect Gainesville, 5 miles to the west, with Alexandria, 25 miles to the east. After completing the . . . — Map (db m658) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 10th New York Vol. InfantryNational Zouaves
Erected by the State of New York, to commemorate the patriotic services of the 10th Reg't New York Volunteers National Zouaves Mustered into the U.S. Service April 27th 1861. Reorganized as a Battalion, April 27th 1863. Participated in 23 . . . — Map (db m9836) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 13th New York InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. 1st Brigade (Roberts), First Division (Morell) Fifth Corps (Porter), Army of the Potomac, USA 13th New York Infantry ("Rochester Regiment") Col. Elisha G. Marshall "The Rebel infantry poured in their volleys, and we . . . — Map (db m18310) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 15th Alabama InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade (Brown) Ewell's Division (Lawton) Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 15th Alabama Infantry Maj. A. A. Lowther "On the right the Federals were in an old field in plain view, and the . . . — Map (db m18360) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 15th Alabama InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 15th Alabama Infantry Maj. A. A. Lowther "My position in line at this fence was in the immediate rear of Alonzo Watson. We were . . . — Map (db m39316) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 19th Indiana Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 19th Indiana Infantry Col. Solomon Meredith "The enemy was secreted under cover of a fence and did not make their appearance . . . — Map (db m8430) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 1st Massachusetts InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 3:00 p.m. 1st Brigade (Grover), Second Division (Hooker) Third Corps (Heintzelman), Army of the Potomac, USA 1st Massachusetts Infantry Col. Robert Godwin “Without artillery and without supports, our men advanced. We . . . — Map (db m40535) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 20th New York State Militia"Ulster Guard" — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. 3rd Brigade (Patrick), First Division (Hatch) Third Corps (McDowell) Army of Virginia (Pope), USA 20th New York State Militia (80th New York Volunteers) "Ulster Guard" Col. George W. Pratt "The order was given to . . . — Map (db m18359) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 21st Georgia InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 21st Georgia INfantry Capt. Thomas C. Glover "The fence being reached, the work of death commenced at short range. From this fence . . . — Map (db m18298) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 21st North Carolina InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 21st North Carolina Infantry Lt. Col. Sanders Fulton "We halted at this fence, quickly tore it down, and piled the rails in front. . . . — Map (db m39432) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 24th New York InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. 1st Brigade (Sullivan), First Division (Hatch) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 24th New York Infantry ("Oswego Regiment") Maj. Andrew Barney "Those of us on the embankment were too few to even attempt to . . . — Map (db m18317) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 26th Georgia InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Lawton's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 26th Georgia Infantry Maj. Eli S. Griffin "We were ordered in just after dark. We marched steadily across an open field for about . . . — Map (db m18358) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 2nd New Hampshire Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Burnside), Second Division (Hunter) Army of Northeastern Virginia, USA 2nd New Hampshire Infantry Col. Gilman Marston "With the 71st New York State Militia on its left, the 2nd New Hampshire rushed to . . . — Map (db m9734) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 2nd New Hampshire InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 3:00 p.m. 1st Brigade (Grover), Second Division (Hooker) Third Corps (Heintzelman), Army of the Potomac, USA 2nd New Hampshire Infantry Col. Gilman Marston “There was a crash of Rebel musketry, an answering roar of . . . — Map (db m40532) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 2nd Rhode Island Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Burnside) Army of Northeastern Virginia, USA 2nd Rhode Island Infantry Col. John S. Slocum "The 2nd was hotly engaged and made so gallant a fight as to push the enemy off the plateau and partly down . . . — Map (db m9737) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 2nd Wisconsin InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 2nd Wisconsin Infantry Col. Edgar O'Conner "Rebel infantry poured from the woods by the thousands. We were precisely on the . . . — Map (db m8467) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 45th Georgia InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 3:00 p.m. Thomas’ Brigade, A.P. Hill’s Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 45th Georgia Infantry Maj. W. L. Rice “General Hill had sent a courier previously for us to get out but we failed to get . . . — Map (db m40525) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 49th Georgia InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 3:00 p.m. Thomas’ Brigade, A.P. Hill’s Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 49th Georgia Infantry Lt. Col. S. M. Manning “The enemy made a dash at our brigade, about 1500 strong, and broke our . . . — Map (db m40553) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 4th Alabama Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 3rd Brigade (Bee) Army of the Shenandoah (Johnson), CSA 4th Alabama Infantry Col. Egbert J. Jones "Our regiment had scarcely emerged from the timber before a murderous fire was opened on us by the Yankees. Our . . . — Map (db m9730) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 4th South Carolina Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 6:30 a.m. 7th Brigade (Evans) Army of the Potomac (Beauregard), CSA 4th South Carolina Infantry Col. J.B.E. Sloan "Just before day on Sunday morning those of us on post nearest the Warrenton Turnpike heard the enemy . . . — Map (db m9740) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 5th Regiment New York Volunteer InfantryDuryee Zouaves
Erected by the State of New York September 29, 1906, to commemorate the heroic services of the 5th Regiment New York Volunteer Infantry (Duryee Zouaves) ———————————— Here, . . . — Map (db m9839) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 63rd Pennsylvania InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 5:30 p.m. 1st Brigade (Robinson), First Division (Kearny) Third Corps (Heintzelman), Army of the Potomac, USA 63rd Pennsylvania Infantry Col. Alexander Hays “As the word “Charge!” rang out, we dashed forward . . . — Map (db m40530) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 6th Wisconsin InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 6th Wisconsin Infantry Col. Lysander Cutler "When at short range, Colonel Cutler ordered the regiment to halt and fire. We were . . . — Map (db m39317) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 71st New York State Militia — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Burnside), 2nd Division (Hunter) Army of Northeastern Virginia, USA 71st New York State Militia Col. Henry P. Martin "The Alabama 4th, which had long ago expressed, in print, their desire to meet the . . . — Map (db m9733) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 73rd Ohio Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 5:00 p.m. 2nd Brigade (McLean), First Division (Schenk) First Corps (Sigel), Army of Virginia, USA 73rd Ohio Infantry Col. Orland Smith "The enemy in our front, moving in concert with those on our flank, came out of the . . . — Map (db m9788) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 76th New York InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. 2nd Brigade (Doubleday), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 76th New York Infantry ("Cortland County Regiment") Col. W.P. Wainwright "Waving their colors defiantly, the rebels advanced . . . — Map (db m18278) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Georgia Markers
Sometime after 1903, veterans of the 7th Georgia Infantry erected at least six markers on the Manassas battlefield to locate battle positions. Only this marker and one other approximately 350 yards southeast of here survive. Colonel Francis S. . . . — Map (db m8236) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Georgia Markers
Veterans of the 7th Georgia Infantry selected Manassas Battlefield as the site of their annual reunion in 1905. During their visit the group erected seven marble markers to denote the different positions occupied by the regiment at both battles. All . . . — Map (db m90619) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Georgia Regiment
5th Position 7th GA Regt. July 21, 1861. — Map (db m101444) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Wisconsin InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 7th Wisconsin Infantry Col. William W. Robinson "We soon found that we had to deal with General Ewell's whole division of . . . — Map (db m39372) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 83rd Pennsylvania InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:30 p.m. 3rd Brigade (Butterfield), First Division (Morell) Fifth Corps (Porter), Army of the Potomac, USA 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry Capt. Thomas F. McCoy "The whole brigade went back pell mell together. It is probable that . . . — Map (db m18314) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 8th Georgia Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Bartow) Army of the Shenandoah (Johnson), CSA 8th Georgia Infantry Lt. Col. W.M. Gardner "Away we went straight into the teeth of the murderous fire. We entered a thicket and were within 100 yards of . . . — Map (db m9731) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — A Debt Repaid
The stone rubble is all that remains of Christian Hill, the postwar home of Amos and Margaret Benson. Following the First Battle of Manassas, the Bensons discovered a wounded Union soldier, Private John Rice of the 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, left . . . — Map (db m62052) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — A Stand Up FightSecond Battle of Manassas — Day One - August 28, 1862 - Nightfall
Union Brig. Gen. John Gibbon advanced through the woods with his men intent on driving off the Confederate artillery. Discovering Stonewall Jackson's infantry in force and "...finding that the regiment had become badly involved I ordered the . . . — Map (db m58808) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — G-19 — Action at Bristoe Station
On 26 August 1862 Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s command, led by Col. Thomas T. Munford’s 2d Virginia Cavalry and Maj. Gen. Richard S. Ewell’s division, arrived here at sunset after marching 54 miles in two days around Maj. . . . — Map (db m4852) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Archeology at Brawner Farm
Once the scene of bloody combat, Brawner Farm sits today in a quiet corner of Manassas Battlefield. Archeologists have conducted multiple investigations of the property, which have uncovered the site of several structures and unearthed thousands of . . . — Map (db m88513) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Archer’s BrigadeSecond Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 5:30 p.m. A.P. Hill’s Division, Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA Archer's Brigade Brig. Gen. James J. Archer 1st Tennessee 19th Georgia 7th Tennessee 5th Alabama Battalion 14th Tennessee “As my leading . . . — Map (db m40523) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Artillery DuelFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 2 p.m.
General Irvin McDowell felt confident that victory was at hand. The Federal flanking column had marched around and behind the Confederate defenses along Bull Run. Nearly 18,000 troops were at, or en route, to the front. Confederate resistance on . . . — Map (db m90819) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Attack From Matthews HillCannoneer's-Eye View — First Battle of Manassas
From the ridge beyond Stone House 15,000 Federals were swiftly advancing in this direction. Confederate Capt. John Imboden rushed four cannon into position here, to try to slow the Federal attack. Behind this slight rise the artillerists had some . . . — Map (db m8229) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Battery HeightsSecond Battle of Manassas — Day One - August 28, 1862 - 6:30 p.m.
As General Rufus King's Union division marched eastward along the Warrenton Turnpike (U.S. Route 29 today), they came under fire from Confederate artillery on the distant ridge. Captain Joseph Campbell's Battery B, 4th U.S. Artillery wheeled off the . . . — Map (db m58895) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Battlefield of Bull Run or First Manassas
July 21, 1861. Confederates under General Beauregard defeated Federals under General McDowell. General Jackson given name of “Stonewall” on this field. Generals Bee and Bartow killed. Old stone house used as hospital. This marker erected . . . — Map (db m840) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Battling for the Rocky KnollSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Two - August 29, 1862
Stonewall Jackson's defensive line extended nearly two miles - from Sudley Church to the Brawner Farm. Many of his 24,000 troops were posted behind the cuts and fills of the unfinished railroad grade before you. The formidable position enabled . . . — Map (db m88517) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Ben LomondPringle House Hospital
On July 21, 1861, as elements of the Stonewall Brigade marched to the Manassas battlefield on the road behind you, officers converted the Pringle house (also called Ben Lomond) into a temporary field hospital. Soon wounded Confederates flooded the . . . — Map (db m43311) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 49 — Ben Lomond Farm
The Federal style stone, “Manor” house and its accessory buildings are the visible reminders of Ben Lomond Farm, which was begun in about 1830 by Benjamin Tasker Chinn, the grandson of Robert “Councillor” Carter. Ben Lomond . . . — Map (db m43313) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Blocking the Union Advance — First Battle of Manassas
Knowing they were badly outnumbered, Evans' 900 Confederates stared across this open field, waiting for the enemy to appear over the crest of the hill. Their only hope was to slow the 15,000-man Federal column long enough for reinforcements to . . . — Map (db m9660) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Blocking the Union AdvanceFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 10:30 a.m.
After Departing their position near the Stone Bridge, Confederate troops under Colonel Nathan Evans deployed on this ground to intercept the enemy flanking column advancing southward on the Sudley Road. Knowing they were outnumbered, their only hope . . . — Map (db m101452) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow
Born Savannah Georgia, Sept. 16, 1816 Mortally wounded on this spot, July 21, 1861 Commanded 7th, 8th, 9th & 11th Georgia & 1st Kentucky Regiments The first Confederate officer to give his life on the field. — Map (db m593) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Brooklyn Fourteenth
14th Regiment N.Y.S.M. (84th Regiment N.Y. Vols.) This monument is erected in commemoration of the dead of the regiment in the battles of First Bull Run, July 21, 1861 • Gainesville, August 28, 1862 • Groveton, August 29, 1862 • Second Bull Run, . . . — Map (db m14082) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Brownsville
During the Civil War, the William M. Lewis plantation “Brownsville” consisted of 400 acres of land, a large family residence, and numerous outbuildings. Four of the buildings housed a total of twenty-two slaves. Here stood the main . . . — Map (db m14174) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — C-48 — Campaign of Second Manassas
Here Taliaferro, of Jackson’s force, came into the highway in the late night of August 27, 1862. He was marching from Manassas to the position about a mile and a half to the north held by Jackson in the Second Battle of Manassas. — Map (db m108460) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Carter Cemetery
Over 70 members of the Carter family rest in this cemetery – spanning multiple generations and two centuries of continuous ownership. The graves are arranged in a linear pattern, although none are marked with an inscribed headstone. The . . . — Map (db m62819) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Cavalry Clash — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
These open fields and low hills make idea terrain for a cavalry fight. Here on the Lewis property, John Buford's cavalry was guarding the Union Army's left flank during the retreat from Henry Hill. Scouts reported Rebel cavalry approaching fast. . . . — Map (db m9758) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Cavalry ClashSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three - August 30, 1862 - 6 p.m.
As fighting stalled along Sudley Road, Union and Confederate cavalry partook in the final drama of the battle here on the grounds of Portici. Southern horsemen attempted to dash behind the Union army and cut their escape route. Anticipating this . . . — Map (db m59008) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Charge on Griffin’s GunsRaw Recruits: The 33rd Va. Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
The Virginians were waiting, tense, here at the wood’s edge—their first time under bombardment. Shells from Ricketts’ battery exploded in the boughs overhead and plowed up the ground in front. When the two Union cannon rolled into position on . . . — Map (db m895) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Chinn RidgeSecond Battle of Manassas - Day Three — August 30, 1862
The massive Confederate counterattack appeared unstoppable. General James Longstreet’s wing of the army – upwards of 28,000 troops – steadily pushed east toward Henry Hill. If the Confederates occupied that plateau, ironically the same . . . — Map (db m88714) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Church During WartimeFirst Battle of Manassas
People were on their way to worship—some already in the church yard—when thousands of Federal soldiers suddenly appeared marching south Sudley Road. Within minutes the sound of gunfire came from the direction of Matthews Hill. As wounded . . . — Map (db m878) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Colonel Cameron
of the 79th New York Regiment was killed here on July 21, 1861. Battle of First Manassas (Bull Run) — Map (db m8231) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Colonel Fletcher Webster
In memory of Colonel Fletcher Webster Who here fell August 30, 1862 while gallantly leading his regiment the 12th Mass. Volunteers This memorial was dedicated Oct. 21, 1914 by survivors of his regiment and Fletcher Webster Post, G.A.R. of . . . — Map (db m8469) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Colonel Thomas
of Johnston's staff was killed here July 21, 1861. Battle of First Manassas (Bull Run) — Map (db m8238) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Company B, 4th U.S. ArtillerySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 6:30 p.m. 1st Division (King), Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA Company B, 4th U.S. Artillery Capt. Joseph B. Campbell Six 12-pounder Napoleons "Campbell's pieces came up on the gallop, these fences along the pike . . . — Map (db m17476) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Confederate CounterattackSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three - August 30, 1862 - 4 p.m.
Generals Robert E. Lee and James Longstreet both concluded the moment had arrived to launch a massive Confederate offensive at Second Manassas. Longstreet's wing of the army - nearly 30,000 troops - stood primed to sweep forward and sever the Union . . . — Map (db m58861) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Confederate HeadquartersPortici — First Battle of Manassas
Fought in civilian's fields and front yards, the battle had a terrible intimacy. At this site stood the Lewis home, "Portici" (Por-TEE-cee) - a large plantation. Most Confederate regiments passed through the Lewis property during the twelve hours of . . . — Map (db m9757) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Confederate HeadquartersFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861
Portici made an idea headquarters for Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston. From here he had a commanding view of the main roads and surrounding countryside. Throughout the day Confederate regiments passed through the Lewis property en route to . . . — Map (db m59007) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Confederates Rally — First Battle of Manassas
This field was a scene of confusion. Shells were exploding all around. Hot, tired, shot-up during the retreat from Matthews Hill, Confederate units had fallen out of line and were milling about. They felt they'd lost the battle and maybe the war. . . . — Map (db m8206) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Confederates RallyFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 12:30 p.m.
Many Confederates felt they had lost the battle - perhaps the war. At that moment Generals Johnston and P.G.T Beauregard arrived on Henry Hill and began to rally the scattered regiments. The fugitives started to reform behind fresh reinforcements . . . — Map (db m101441) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Counterattack — First Battle of Manassas
Dead cannoneers lay in rows between their cannon, dead horses along the back slope; the Union guns were immobilized yet still a magnet for both armies. Up this slope marched the 14th Brooklyn, resplendent in Zouave uniforms. They managed to . . . — Map (db m896) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 50 — Dean Divers Church
This area was known as Five Forks during the Civil War and was settled by freed slaves during Reconstruction. In 1900 a Missionary Sunday School was opened on Balls Ford Road by Miss Jennie Dean. In 1909 this site was donated by Henritta Page. . . . — Map (db m20962) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Death of Fletcher Webster — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
On the morning of the 30th, Col. Fletcher Webster wrote his wife: "If a fight comes off, it will be to-day or to-morrow & will be a most dreadful & decisive one. This may be my last letter, dear love, for I shall not spare myself..." About 5 p.m., . . . — Map (db m9828) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Death of Fletcher Webster
Colonel Fletcher Webster fell mortally wounded near here, leading his regiment in support of the cannon on Chinn Ridge. The colonel, son of the famous orator and statesman Daniel Webster, commanded the 12th Massachusetts Infantry - a regiment he . . . — Map (db m94601) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Deep CutPorter's Attack — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
Before the attack, soldiers massed in the woods behind the present day road - 10,000 men under Maj. Gen. Fitz John Porter. This would be the major Union attack of Second Manassas. At 3 p.m., a lieutenant in Berdan's Sharpshooters addressed his . . . — Map (db m18361) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Defeat and DisarrayFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 5 p.m.
By day's end the Confederates held Henry Hill, capturing eight of the eleven Union cannon brought atop this plateau. Rebel reinforcements extended the battle lines across Sudley Road to neighboring Chinn Ridge (one-half mile ahead of you). Federal . . . — Map (db m89201) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Defending the Cannon5th Maine Battery — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
Picture Longstreet's advance - gray lines of Confederates as far as you can see, driving Ohio troops from the rail fence across the field toward this position. Here four gun crews from Maine were trying to load and fire faster than they ever had in . . . — Map (db m9806) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Defending the CannonSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three August 30, 1862 5:30 p.m.
As the Ohioans strived to delay the Confederates, Federal reinforcements rushed to Chinn Ridge in support. With these troops came the 5th Battery, Maine Light Artillery, under the temporary command of Lt. William F. Twitchell. The five guns . . . — Map (db m94600) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Dunklin Monument
T. L. Dunklin, of Co. E. 4th. Texas Regt. Born at Abberdeen Miss. March 25th. 1841, Fell at 2nd. Battle of Mannassas, Aug. 30th. 1862; Defending his Country. ——— — Map (db m14418) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Dying in LineSecond Battle of Manassas — Day One - August 28, 1862
At Brawner Farm there was little maneuvering. Union and Confederate infantry stood in parade-style lines fifty yards apart. At that range they could not miss. The soldiers fired volley after volley for two hours, with only a few fence rails and ruts . . . — Map (db m8402) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Farm Ford — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 Here, about 11:00 a.m., Col. William T. Sherman led his four regiments across Bull Run and joined the Union drive toward Henry Hill. Later that day the ford was used again, this time by the retreating Union army. — Map (db m9738) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Farm FordFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 - 11 a.m.
Colonel William T. Sherman spent the morning searching for a location suitable for his brigade to cross Bull Run. He ruled out the Stone Bridge - its narrow span stood too exposed, and rumors circulated that the bridge was mined. Turning his . . . — Map (db m63040) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Federal Artillery Position — Second Battle of Manassas
August 29 & 30, 1862 Federal Artillery Position A succession of Union artillery batteries occupied this ridge throughout August 29 and 30, 1862. August 29 Company I, 1st Ohio Light Artillery Capt. Hubert Dilger (9-11 a.m.) 2nd Battery, New . . . — Map (db m9855) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Federal Artillery Positions — Second Battle of Manassas
August 29 and 30, 1862 Federal Artillery Positions From the John Dogan House northward to this point, Union batteries occupied this ridge throughout the Second Battle of Manassas. At one time on August 30 more than thirty guns were firing from . . . — Map (db m15919) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Field Hospital
After both battles U.S. Army surgeons used the small frame house and outbuildings that stood on this property: "In about two hours, Sudley Church was completely filled and I was obliged to take possession of three other unoccupied buildings. As . . . — Map (db m9749) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Fight at the Fence LineSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three August 30, 1862 4:30 p.m.
Colonel Nathaniel McLean braced his men for the coming onslaught. The Union officer, a civilian attorney with no prewar military background, commanded 1,200 Ohioans on Chinn Ridge. The ground directly in front of his brigade was open at the time of . . . — Map (db m94597) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Fight at the Fenceline — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
From the left and rear came wave after wave of Confederates. At that moment the only troops facing them were two regiments of Ohio infantry taking cover behind the rail fence. (The Ohioans knew what was coming: they had witnessed the few surviving . . . — Map (db m9759) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Fighting in TwilightThe Hatch-Hood Collision — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Two - August 29, 1862
Officers said the Rebels were retreating. Hatch’s Division was ordered to pursue. Marching double-quick west on the turnpike, the Federals reached this hill just after sundown. Suddenly the ridge erupted with fire. In the . . . — Map (db m873) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Final StruggleFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 3 - 4 p.m.
Up the slope marched Federal troops, determined to retake the cannons lost moments earlier. The bodies of slain artillerists and infantrymen littered the landscape. The Yankees recaptured Griffin's two guns and attempted to drag the two pieces to . . . — Map (db m89145) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — C-34 — First Battle of Manassas
Henry Hill lies just to the south. Here the Confederates repulsed the repeated attacks of the Union army under McDowell. July 21, 1861. Here Jackson won the name “Stonewall” and from here began McDowell’s retreat that ended at Washington. — Map (db m596) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — C-44 — First Battle of Manassas
On the Matthews Hill, just to the north, the Confederates repulsed the attack of the Unionists, coming from the north, in the forenoon of July 21, 1861. The Union forces, reinforced, drove the Confederates to the Henry Hill, just to the south. There . . . — Map (db m602) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — First Brigade(The Stonewall Brigade) — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. Jackson's Division (W. B. Taliaferro) Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA First Brigade (The Stonewall Brigade) Col. William S. Baylor 2nd Virginia 5th Virginia 4th Virginia 27th Virginia 33rd Virginia . . . — Map (db m8465) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — First Brigade(The Stonewall Brigade) — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. Jackson's Division (Starke) Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA First Brigade (The Stonewall Brigade) Col. William S. Baylor 2nd Virginia 5th Virginia 4th Virginia 27th Virginia 33rd Virginia "The . . . — Map (db m18300) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — First ContactFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 - 10 a.m.
The head of General Irvin McDowell's flanking column reached Matthews Hill shortly after 10 a.m. Progress had been slow. The rookie soldiers frequently broke ranks to rest. Some stopped to pick blackberries. More than 13,000 Union troops lagged . . . — Map (db m58975) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Flight from Matthews HillFirst Battle of Manassas, July 21, 1861, 11:30 a.m.
The First Battle of Manassas started on Matthews Hill — the prominent rise one-half mile ahead of you. Thousands of Federals were swiftly advancing in this direction. Confederate Capt. John Imboden rushed four cannon into position near here to . . . — Map (db m108174) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Fourth BrigadeSecond Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. Jackson's Division (Starke), Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virgina, CSA Fourth Brigade Col. Leroy A. Stafford 1st Louisiana 10th Louisiana 2nd Louisiana 15th Louisiana 9th Louisiana Coppens' Battalion "The . . . — Map (db m18333) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Frank Head
Frank Head, Color Bearer of the 14th Brooklyn Regiment, was killed here on July 21, 1861. Battle of First Manassas (Bull Run) — Map (db m94608) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — General Barnard Elliott Bee
General Barnard Elliott Bee of South Carolina Commander, Third Brigade Army of the Shenandoah was killed here July 21, 1861 Just before his death to rally his scattered troops he gave this command “Form. form. There stands Jackson like a . . . — Map (db m540) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — George T. Stovall
This marble marks the spot where fell George T. Stovall of the Rome Light Guards, 8th Regt. Georgia Volunteers in the battle of July 21, 1861. Born at Augusta, GA, April 25, 1835. His life he devoted to his God and sacrificed in his country's . . . — Map (db m1996) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Gregg’s BrigadeSecond Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 5:30 p.m. A.P. Hill’s Division, Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA Gregg's Brigade Brig. Gen. Maxcy Gregg 1st South Carolina 12th South Carolina 1st South Carolina Rifles 13th South Carolina 14th South Carolina . . . — Map (db m40563) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Grover’s Attack ▪ Union Bayonet ChargeSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Two, August 29, 1862
Grover’s troops waited for the Rebels to fire, then charged up the ten-foot embankment. With no time to reload, Confederates were caught hugging the rear slope. The charging Federals stabbed with bayonets, crushed skulls with musket butts, and broke . . . — Map (db m40570) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Groveton – Second Battle of Bull Run
August 30, 1862. Confederates under Generals Lee, Jackson and Longstreet defeated Federals under General Pope. General Longstreet dined at Old Dogan House. Fierce fight of R.R. cut half mile northwest. — Map (db m871) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Groveton Confederate Cemetery
Neither side had anticipated the war's cost in blood. After the fighting at Manassas, burial details dug shallow graves where soldiers had fallen. There was little time for ceremony. Crude wooden headboards sometimes noted the soldier's name and . . . — Map (db m58897) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Groveton Monument
Like its companion monument on Henry Hill, this obelisk was constructed by Union soldiers at the close of the Civil War. It honors the Federal dead of the Second Battle of Manassas. The monument was dedicated on June 11, 1865. Souvenir hunters later . . . — Map (db m90825) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Hazel Plain
In 1860, Benjamin Chinn and his family lived here in a two-and-a-half story frame farmhouse. Known as "Hazel Plain," the modest plantation comprised several hundred acres. The property was typical of those in Prince William County, yielding wheat, . . . — Map (db m58865) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Henry HillFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861
Today's serene and peaceful fields belie the carnage that occurred here on July 21, 1861, when Union and Confederate troops clashed at the first major land battle of the Civil War - the First Battle of Manassas (Bull Run). The Heaviest and most . . . — Map (db m90820) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Henry Hill Walking TourRetracing the Battle — First Battle of Manassas
On the tour route you follow in the footsteps of charging Union and Confederate troops, and stand where they loaded cannon or braced for a bayonet assault. Terrain and tree lines have changed little since that day. As you walk imagine deafening . . . — Map (db m8270) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — G-15 — Henry House
These are the grounds of the Henry House, where occurred the main action of the First Battle of Manassas, July 21, 1861, and the closing scene of the Second Battle of Manassas, August 30, 1862. — Map (db m600) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Historic Farm Road Trace — First Battle of Manassas
Brig. Gen. Thomas J. Jackson's First Virginia Brigade, plus artillery, marched from Confederate headquarters at the Lewis House ("Portici") along this wagon path to Henry Hill, arriving here about noon. — Map (db m8299) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Historic Landscape Restoration
In 1997 the National Park Service and the Smithsonian Institution began to develop a proposal at Manassas National Battlefield Park to mitigate the loss of wetlands resulting from the construction of the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, a National Air . . . — Map (db m8374) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Historic Road TraceManassas National Battlefield Park
The road trace before you once linked the Spring Hill Farm (Henry Hill) and the Portici plantation. Both of these properties figured prominently at First Manassas and the narrow path connecting them became a conduit for Confederate troop movements. . . . — Map (db m101440) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Honoring the Dead — First Battle of Manassas
Union Soldiers built Henry Hill Monument to commemorate those who died at First Bull Run (Manassas). For many Civil War veterans this had been their first battle. Intense memories drew both Union and Confederate soldiers back to this scene years . . . — Map (db m33211) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Honoring the Dead
One of the earliest endeavors to remember the fallen occurred soon after the war concluded. Union troops stationed at nearby Fairfax Court House, many of whom had recently served on burial duty at the battlefield, recognized the need for a fitting . . . — Map (db m94594) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Invaded Farmland — First Battle of Manassas
The morning of the battle was hot and still. Except for a few details the scene mirrored today's pastoral landscape. Fields lay fallow, overgrown with tall grass. Around the Henry House grew rose bushes and a small peach orchard. . . . — Map (db m879) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Invaded Farmland
Spring Hill Farm - now simply known as Henry Hill - lay fallow and overgrown in the summer of 1861. A small vegetable garden and orchard surrounded the frame house. Inside the home, 84-year old Judith Henry remained bedridden, too old to work the . . . — Map (db m94595) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Jackson Opens FireSecond Battle of Manassas — Day One, August 28, 1862, 6 p.m.
"My command was advanced...until it reached a commanding position near Brawner's house. By this time it was sunset; but as [the Union] column appeared to be moving by, with its flank exposed, I determined to attack at once." Observing a column . . . — Map (db m45952) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Jackson StrikesBrawner Farm: The Battle Begins — Second Battle of Manassas - Day One - August 28, 1862
Union troops were approaching from the west, raising a long cloud of dust on Warrenton Pike. They did not suspect any Confederate infantry in the area and paid little attention to a lone cavalryman trotting back and forth along this ridge. The . . . — Map (db m8458) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Jackson’s Route
In 1861, small farms surrounded Bull Run. Small roads were the main transportation routes to the Warrenton Turnpike (Route 29), Sudley Road (Route 234) and the Manassas Gap Railroad. The entrance road here follows a section of a 19th-century farm . . . — Map (db m2479) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — G-16 — James Robinson House
To the south stood the farmhouse of James Robinson, a former slave freed by Landon Carter. There, during the First Battle of Manassas on 21 July 1961, Col. Wade Hampton’s Legion covered the Confederates falling back to Henry Hill, where Jackson . . . — Map (db m6590) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Kemper's Brigade — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 5:15 p.m. Kemper's Division, Right Wing (Longstreet) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA Kemper's Brigade Col. Montgomery D. Corse 1st Virginia - 11th Virginia 7th Virginia - 17th Virginia 24th Virginia "We neared the Chinn . . . — Map (db m9782) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Kemper's Brigade — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 5:30 p.m. Kemper's Division, Right Wing (Longstreet) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA Kemper's Brigade Col. Montgomery D. Corse 1st Virginia - 11th Virginia 7th Virginia - 17th Virginia 24th Virginia "Above us, on a gentle . . . — Map (db m9794) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Lieutenant Ramsey
of Ricketts' Battery was killed here July 21, 1861. Battle of First Manassas (Bull Run) — Map (db m8234) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Lieutenant William P. Mangum
of the 6th North Carolina, son of Senator Mangum was mortally wounded here on July 21, 1861. — Map (db m8239) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Like a StonewallFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 2 p.m.
Confederate reinforcements deployed into battle line at the edge of the woods behind you. Anchoring the center of this new position stood a brigade of Virginians — 2,500 strong — under the command of General Thomas J. Jackson. When told . . . — Map (db m89242) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Lucinda Dogan House
This house is the only remaining structure of the crossroads community of Groveton. Originally built as an overseer's cabin, it became the Dogan family's primary dwelling after the main house, "Peach Grove," burned in 1860. — Map (db m17469) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Lucinda Dogan House
This small frame house stands as the only surviving original structure of the crossroad village of Groveton. Widow Lucinda Dogan and her five young children moved here shortly after their residence, “Peach Grove,” burned in 1860. The . . . — Map (db m57997) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Matthews HillFirst Taste of Combat — First Battle of Manassas
Officers were trying to hurry the long Union column down the road past Matthews Hill. (McDowell's flanking plan depended on speed and surprise.) Suddenly there was a rattle of musketry ahead. Like a nightmare in sunlight, men stumbled out of the . . . — Map (db m101448) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 48 — McLean Farm (Yorkshire Plantation)
Part of an early 18th century plantation established on Bull Run by Col. Richard Blackburn formerly of Yorkshire, England, the land was acquired by Wilmer McLean in 1854. The battle which opened 1st Manassas raged across this farm July 18, 1861, . . . — Map (db m657) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Meadowville
The depression of the old farm road and the jumbled house foundations before you are all that remain of the plantation "Meadowville". John Cundiff, a bachelor, lived here during the Civil War producing oats, potatoes and hay, on about 350 acres of . . . — Map (db m8470) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Mitchell’s FordConfederate Strongpoint
Here on the south bank of Bull Run, Confederate forces constructed log-and-earth trenches to defend Mitchell’s Ford, a strategically important crossing point. On July 17, 1861, as Union Gen. Irvin McDowell’s army approached Centreville, Confederate . . . — Map (db m35051) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — On the Skirmish LineSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three - August 30, 1862 - 2:30 p.m.
Thirty minutes before the main assault, Colonel Hiram Berdan's 1st U.S. Sharpshooters clambered over the fence along the Groveton-Sudley Road and dashed into the open pasture. The skilled marksmen kept up a steady fire with their breech-loading . . . — Map (db m58853) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — One-Sided SlaughterFate of the 5th New York — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
The 5th N.Y. Infantry thought they had gotten off easy that day. The trees screened them from Confederate artillery fire, and most of the fighting was a mile off to the right near Deep Cut. Suddenly they heard heavy musket fire up ahead. Terrified . . . — Map (db m9842) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Opening Shots"Look Out for Your Left!" — First Battle of Manassas
Confederates were spread out along this ridge - 1100 men commanded by Col. Nathan "Shanks" Evans. At first light, Federals east of Stone Bridge sent a cannon shell screaming overhead. Skirmishers from both sides opened a sporadic musket fire. After . . . — Map (db m9741) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Opening ShotsFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 6 a.m.
From this ridge, Colonel Nathan G. Evans stood watch over the Stone Bridge, prepared to contest Union efforts to cross Bull Run. His brigade of 1,100 Confederates anchored the left flank of a seven mile defensive line guarding Manassas Junction. At . . . — Map (db m94610) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — OutnumberedThe Stand in Robinson’s Lane — First Battle of Manassas
Shot-up Confederate regiments stumbled past, in retreat from Matthews Hill. First along Warrenton Pike, then in Robinson’s Lane, Col. Wade Hampton’s South Carolinians tried to delay the Union advance. Slowly, with volley after volley of musket fire, . . . — Map (db m899) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Outnumbered: The Stand in Robinson LaneFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 12 p.m.
Colonel Wade Hampton's infantry occupied the Warrenton Turnpike in front of the Robinson farm as the Confederate position on Matthews Hill collapsed. Having arrived at Manassas Junction earlier that morning after a 30-hour train ride from Richmond, . . . — Map (db m101443) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Pittsylvania
The foundation stones in front of you are all that remain of a once grand estate known as Pittsylvania. Landon Carter, Jr., grandson of Robert “King” Carter, built Pittsylvania around 1765. The Georgian-style frame house stood on a . . . — Map (db m62662) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Point Blank VolleyFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 2:45 p.m.
Captain Charles Griffin's cannon, a section of Battery D, 5th U.S. Artillery, fired only two rounds when an unidentified line of infantry approached from the fence ahead. Who were they? Griffin proclaimed them the enemy. His commanding officer, the . . . — Map (db m89204) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Point-Blank VolleyAn Officer’s Error? — First Battle of Manassas
In clear view of artillerymen here, Confederates lined up at the fence and trees across the open field. The two cannon and supporting infantry could have stopped the Rebels cold, yet the four hundred charging Virginians were able to fire a musket . . . — Map (db m881) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Pope's Headquarters — Second Battle of Manassas
August 29 & 30, 1862 Headquarters, Army of Virginia, USA Pope's Headquarters Headquarters, Army of Virginia, USA 1:00 p.m. August 29 to 6:00 p.m. August 30, 1862 "There were no tents, nothing to mark the spot except a cracker box or two for . . . — Map (db m14511) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Portici
On the ridge ahead of you stood "Portici," an important landmark of both battles of Manassas. In 1861, Frank Lewis resided here with his wife Fannie and two small children. Their middling plantation consisted of 769 acres. The family owned eleven . . . — Map (db m59009) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Prince William County World War I Memorial
Dedicated to the Citizens of Prince William County who lost their lives in the service of their country in the the 1917 - World War - 1919 Fewell Athey • Carrington Bailey • Maurice Beavers • John Blackwell • John C. . . . — Map (db m21983) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Re-Burying the DeadGroveton Confederate Cemetery
Of the 266 soldiers buried here, only two are fully identified. • Heavy fire often kept either side from claiming the dead, and after both battles the armies had to maneuver quickly. Some of the wounded lay for days in the blistering sun. • After . . . — Map (db m408) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Retreat from Chinn Ridge — First Battle of Manassas
Expecting to outflank the Rebels, Col. Oliver O. Howard's Maine and Vermont regiments reached the top of this rise in two lines of battle. Suddenly the air exploded with shell fragments. A Confederate battery had opened fire from the Chinn House . . . — Map (db m9830) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Retreat from Chinn RidgeFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 4:30 p.m.
Colonel Oliver O. Howard's brigade brought up the rear of the Federal flanking column. After crossing Bull Run, the New Englanders hastened towards the sounds of battle. In the mid-afternoon heat, dozens of men straggled on the march or collapsed by . . . — Map (db m94606) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Rhode Island Battery — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Burnside, Second Division (Hunter) Army of Northeastern Virginia, USA Rhode Island Battery Capt. William H. Reynolds Six 13-Pounder James Rifled Guns "'Forward into line of action, front,' came Captain . . . — Map (db m8354) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Robinson House — First Battle of Manassas
The home of James Robinson—a freed slave—stood here at the time of the battle. That morning hundreds of Confederates streamed through the yard as they retreated from the Union attach. Surprisingly, the property suffered little damage in . . . — Map (db m5615) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Robinson House
Here stood the home of James Robinson and his family. Born "free" in 1799, James is listed as being of mixed racial parentage. Family oral history suggests that James' father was possibly a member of the Carter family of Pittsylvania plantation. In . . . — Map (db m89249) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — CL-2 — Ruffner Public School - Number 1
July 20, 1872 ————— Named for Wm. H. Ruffner, Virginia’s first superintendent of public instruction, and opened as a public school on this date. Before free public schools were established by the Virginia . . . — Map (db m2425) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Second Battle of Manassas
Second Battle of Manassas Confederate Skirmish Line, Afternoon of August 30, 1862As Union forces prepared to attack General Jackson's Confederate line along the unfinished railroad to the north, Union General John F. Reynolds made a personal . . . — Map (db m8384) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Second Battle of ManassasAugust 28-30, 1862
(1) Route of Jackson's Turning Movement Lee dispatched Stonewall Jackson on a daring raid to cut Pope's communications before Pope could receive massive reinforcements. Marching nearly 25 miles a day, Jackson burned the supply depot at Manassas, . . . — Map (db m17475) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — C-46 — Second Battle of Manassas
On the Henry Hill, Pope’s rear guard, in the late afternoon of August 30, 1862, repulsed the attacks of Longstreet coming from the west. If the hill had been taken, Pope’s army would have been doomed; but the Unionists held it while the rest of . . . — Map (db m108461) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Second Brigade — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 5:15 p.m. Second Division (Ricketts) Third Corps (McDowell) Army of Virginia, USA Second Brigade Brig. Gen. Zealous B. Tower 26th New York - 88th Pennsylvania 94th New York - 90th Pennsylvania "The regiment rushed up on the . . . — Map (db m9791) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Second BrigadeSecond Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. Jackson's Division (Starke), Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA Second Brigade Col. Bradley T. Johnson 21st Virginia 48th Virginia 42nd Virginia 1st Virginia Battalion "We were fighting now as I never . . . — Map (db m18306) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Second BrigadeSecond Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 5:45 p.m. 1st Division (Stevens), Ninth Corps (Reno) Army of the Potomac, USA Second Brigade Col. Daniel Leasure “As we approached, we poured a well directed fire upon the enemy. Our line charged, and as the enemy . . . — Map (db m40527) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Second BrigadeSecond Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 5:30 p.m. 2nd Brigade (Birney), First Division (Kearny) Third Corps (Heintzelman), Army of the Potomac, USA 4th Maine Infantry Col. Elijah Walker 40th New York Infantry Col. Thomas W. Egan 101st New York Infantry Col. . . . — Map (db m40556) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Second Bull Run Monument
Like its companion monument on Henry Hill, this obelisk was constructed by Union soldiers at the close of the Civil War. It was dedicated during an elaborate ceremony held on June 10, 1865. — Map (db m886) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Shooting GalleryS.D. Lee's Artillery — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
From here, Confederate gunners had a clear view of Porter's attack - the most formidable onslaught of the three days. There were few trees between S.D. Lee's Battalion and the nearest Union columns a third of a mile away. As thousands of bluecoats . . . — Map (db m8459) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Shooting GallerySecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three - August 30, 1862 - 3 p.m.
On the morning of August 30, 1862, Confederate Col. Stephen D. Lee deployed 18 guns from his artillery battalion along this commanding ridge. Additional cannon, under Maj. Lindsey M. Shumaker, unlimbered to his left. The artillery linked the two . . . — Map (db m58863) HM

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