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Nashville, Tennessee Historical Markers

 
Academic Building At Fisk University Marker image, Touch for more information
By R. E. Smith, September 2, 2007
Academic Building At Fisk University Marker
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 122 — Academic Building At Fisk University
The Academic Building at Fisk University was designed by Nashville architect Moses McKissack and was made possible by a gift from philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. On May 22, 1908, William H. Taft, later 27th President of the United States, laid the . . . — Map (db m4511) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 64 — Adolphus Heiman1809 - 1862
Born Potsdam, Prussia. Came to Nashville 1838. Lived in home on this site. Architect, Engineer & Builder; Designed Univ. of Nash. Main Bldg., Central State Hosp. Main Bldg., Suspension Bridge over Cumberland River. Masonic Leader; Adj. U.S. Army . . . — Map (db m4512) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 122 — Albertine Maxwell
Regarded as the symbol of dance in her adopted hometown of Nashville, Ellen Albertine Chaiser Maxwell (1902-96) operated the Albertine School of the Dance (1936-80). She had danced with Chicago Opera, Adolf Baum Dance Co., and Ruth St. Denis Dance . . . — Map (db m24195) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Alvin C. York
Front: Armed with his rifle and pistol his courage and skill, this one Tennessean silenced a German Battalion of 35 machine guns, killing 25 enemy soldiers, and capturing 132 in the Argonne Forest of France, October 8, 1918

Right side: . . . — Map (db m86362) HM

Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — An Urban GreenwayAlong Nashville's Historic — Downtown Riverfront
Side 1 From prehistory to the present, the Cumberland River has shaped our city. By the early 1800's, the town of Nashville was thriving because of its proximity to this natural water highway. Goods such as flour, tobacco, pork and iron . . . — Map (db m107696) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Andrew JacksonJackson.
Born March 15, 1767 Died June 8, 1845 Seventh President of the United States 1829-1837 Commander of victorious American forces at Battle of New Orleans January 8, 1815 This equestrian statue by Clark Mills was erected by the Tennessee . . . — Map (db m85487) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Andrew Johnson1808-1875
17th President of the United States of America 1865-1869 — Map (db m85485) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 108 — Anne Dallas Dudley
1876-1955 Anne Dudley played a significant role in the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment by the State of Tennessee. A native of Nashville, she served as president of the Nashville Equal Suffrage League, 1911-15; president of the . . . — Map (db m4524) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 153 — Arna Wendell Bontemps1902 - 1973
At this site lived Arna W. Bontemps, one of the most prolific contributors to the Harlem or Negro Renaissance. From 1943 to 1965, Bontemps, an award-winning poet, playwright, novelist, biographer, historian, editor, and author of children's books, . . . — Map (db m4959) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 10 — Assault on Montgomery Hill — Dec. 15, 1864
500 yards east of here, Maj. Gen. T. J. Wood led an assault by his IV Corps against the Confederate skirmish line on the hill, eventually carrying it. Attacking the main line about 600 yards south, Wood was unable to take it by direct assault, the . . . — Map (db m52302) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 73 — Assumption Church / Cardinal Stritch
(Assumption Church side): Nashville’s second oldest Catholic church, dedicated Aug. 14, 1859, its rectory on right was added in 1874, school on left in 1879. The present altar, windows, and steeple were added later. The Germantown . . . — Map (db m4517) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 37 — Battle of NashvillePeach Orchard Hill
On Dec. 16, 1864, Gen. S.D. Lee's Corps, Army of Tennessee, held this right flank of Hood's defense line which ran south along the crest of this ridge. Violent artillery fire and infantry attacks by the corps of Wood and Steedman failed to dislodge . . . — Map (db m25651) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 12 — Battle of NashvilleOuter Federal Defenses - Dec. 2, 1864
Here the outer Federal Defensive line, which stretched 7 mi. around the city, crossed Hillsboro Pike. It was used at the commencement of the battle on Dec. 15 by Wood's IV Corps as a line of departure for the main attack. Faint traces of the old . . . — Map (db m28420) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 11 — Battle of NashvilleIV Corps Jump-off Line - Dec. 15, 1864
Using the defensive salient 500 yards east, Wood's Corps, with the XVI Corps on its right, swung southwest to envelop the left of the Confederate line, 1 1/2 miles south, and pushed it back in spite of determined resistance. The XXIII Corps . . . — Map (db m28423) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 4 — Battle of NashvilleDefense by Ector's Brigade — Dec. 15, 1864
In position from here northward along high ground, Ector's Brigade of French's Confederate Division commanded by Col. Daniel Coleman, outposted the left of Hood's line. Attacked by the Federal XVI Corps, supported by artillery and part of the . . . — Map (db m52597) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 17 — Battle of NashvilleLee's Position — Dec. 15, 1864
Here, Stephen D. Lee's Corps, Army of Tennessee, bestrode the highway and railroad. Cheatham's Corps held the right of the line, which ran northeast about 2 miles to Rain's Hill. After the Confederate left was broken in the afternoon's fighting, . . . — Map (db m52849) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 15 — Battle of NashvilleConfederate Defenses — Dec. 15, 1864
Stewart's Corps, Army of Tennessee, held this part of Hood's original line, extending east about 1500 yards, and west and south about 1 mile to Hillsboro Pike. After the turning of his left, about 4:00 P.M., Stewart established a new position . . . — Map (db m53345) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N2 2 — Battle of NashvilleSmith's Assault — Dec. 16, 1864
The Federal XVI Corps attacked southward along this road. After violent artillery bombardment, McArthur's Division took the hill to the west about 4:00 p.m., precipitating the rout of Hood's Army. This hill is named for Col. W. M. Shy, 20th Tenn. . . . — Map (db m53351) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N2 1 — Battle of NashvilleConfederate Position — Dec. 16, 1864
Stewart's Corps, badly mauled during the first day, withdrew at night to a line extending eastward. Lee's Corps, forming the right wing, extended the line across Franklin Pike. Cheatham's Corps, on Stewart's left, extended the line westward, and . . . — Map (db m53352) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 6 — Battle of NashvilleTaking of Redoubt No. 5 — Dec. 15, 1864
Hood's Redoubt No. 5 was on this hill. Couch's Division of the XXIII Corps, sweeping to the south of the route of Smith's XVI, captured it and the hills to the east late in the afternoon. Wilson's cavalry, crossing the highway about 2 miles south, . . . — Map (db m53357) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 8 — Battle of NashvilleConfederate Outpost — Dec. 15, 1864
100 yards west was Redoubt No. 3 in the Confederate system of detached works beyond the main line. It was overrun by the enveloping attack of Wood's IV Corps from the northwest. — Map (db m53360) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 5 — Battle of NashvilleShy's Hill
On this hill was fought the decisive encounter of the Battle of Nashville December 16, 1864. At 4:15 P.M. a Federal assault at the angle on top of the hill broke the Confederate line. Col. W. M. Shy 20th Tenn. Inf. was killed and Gen. T. B. Smith . . . — Map (db m53393) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 134 — Battle of Nashville(December 16, 1864) — Confederate Final Stand
After the withdrawal from the main Confederate line at Peach Orchard Hill, Lt. Gen. Stephen D. Lee formed a battle line across Franklin Pike 400 yards east of here with 200 men from the remnants of Brig. Gen. Henry Clayton's division and two cannons . . . — Map (db m53394) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 126 — Battle of Nashville(December 16, 1864) — Assault on the Barricade
During the retreat from Nashville, Colonel Edmund Rucker's brigade attempted to block the Union pursuit by erecting a barricade of fence rails and logs across Granny White Pike, 1/2 mile south of this spot. During the ensuing night attack by Union . . . — Map (db m60230) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N2 4 — Battle of NashvilleConfederate Defenses - Dec. 16, 1864
Lee's Corps held the right flank of the line in the final stages of the battle, linking with Stewart to the west. Here it extended east, then south around Peach Orchard Hill. Violent attacks by Steedman's brigades were repulsed bloodily: Lee did not . . . — Map (db m81429) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 3 — Battle of NashvilleFederal Defenses
The hill to the west was a strong point in the system of permanent Federal defenses, started in 1862, which extended to the river on both sides of the town. Artillery was emplaced here from time to time. — Map (db m84792) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 89 — Battle of Nashville Confederate Line
Trenches about 20 ft. N of this point, held by Loring's Division, were the center of the Confederate main line before the Battle of Nashville. On Dec. 15, 1864, Redoubt No. 1, a key artillery salient 200 yds. NW, fired on Federal forces until . . . — Map (db m52850) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Battle of Nashville Monument
Battle of Nashville 1864 Oh, valorous gray, in the grave of your fate, Oh, glorious blue, in the long dead years, You were sown in sorrow and harrowed in hate, But your harvest is a Nation's tears, For the message you left . . . — Map (db m76476) WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Battle of Nashville Monument
The Battle of Nashville Monument
The Statue The Battle of Nashville Monument was commissioned by the Ladies Battlefield Association (Mrs. James E. Caldwell, President) and created by Giuseppe Moretti. (Look for his signature at the . . . — Map (db m103211) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Battle of the Bluffs
Raged around this point April 2, 1781 between Cherokee Indians and settlers. Loosed by Mrs. James Robertson, dogs from the Fort attacked the Indians allowing settlers to escape to the Fort. Many were killed including Captian James Leiper. — Map (db m72268) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Belle Meade Farm Freedom
In 1865 one hundred thirty six (136) enslaved men, women, and children at Belle Meade Farm gained their freedom. With this freedom they gained the right to choose where they would live and work. Seventy-two (72) farm workers continued under the . . . — Map (db m68986) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Belle Meade PlantationThe Battle of Nashville — Hood's Campaign
(overview) In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman’s supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman’s “March to . . . — Map (db m68971) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Belle Meade PlantationChange of Ownership
Confederate Gen. William Hicks “Billy” Jackson (1835–1903), who acquired Belle Meade Plantation after the war, served with distinction throughout the Western Theater of the Civil War. He was an excellent horseman, a skill that . . . — Map (db m68973) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 16 — Belmont Mansion
This mansion was built in 1853 as a summer home for Joseph and Adelicia Acklen. An 1860 addition by architect Adolphus Heiman expanded the mansion's size to 36 rooms. The entrance to the 177 acre estate, which featured gardens decorated with marble . . . — Map (db m52143) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 142 — Belmont-Hillsboro Neighborhood
When Adelicia Acklen's estate was sold in 1890, the Belmont Mansion and its ground became Belmont College. Other portions, and parts of the neighboring Sunnyside Mansion property, were subdivided into residential lots by the Belmont Land Co. In . . . — Map (db m52304) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 209 — Birth of Bluegrass
In December 1945, Grand Ole Opry star Bill Monroe and his mandolin brought to the Ryman Auditorium stage a band that created a new American musical form. With the banjo style of Earl Scruggs and the guitar of Lester Flatt, the new musical genre . . . — Map (db m24069) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 144 — BMIBroadcast Music, Inc.
BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.), an organization that collects performance royalties for songwriters and music publishers in all genres of music, opened its doors in New York in 1940. BMI was the first performance rights organization to represent what . . . — Map (db m60229) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 140 — Bradley Studios
In 1955, brothers Owen and Harold Bradley built a recording studio in the basement of a house on this site. They added another studio here in an army Quonset Hut, producing hits by Patsy Cline, Red Foley, Brenda Lee, Marty Robbins, Sonny James, and . . . — Map (db m59523) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Captain John Gordon 1763-1819First Postmaster of Nashville 1796-1797
Born in Virginia came to Nashville in 1782. Became a noted defender against the Indians of Old Fort Nashboro and the frontier settlements. Captain of a spy company of the Davidson County Regiment, participated in the Nickajack Expedition which ended . . . — Map (db m84181) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 136 — Carl Van Vechten Art Gallery
This building, completed in 1889, was the first gymnasium built at any predominantly black college in the United States. In 1949, it was rededicated as an art gallery and named in honor of Carl Van Vechten, a New York music critic, author, . . . — Map (db m4507) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Carper Homestead
Known to be one of the oldest houses remaining from the early American era. Originally located on Cane Ridge Road at Antioch, Tennessee. The materials were removed piece-by-piece and rebuilt exactly as it stood when occupied by the . . . — Map (db m104384) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Christ Church Cathedral/Old Christ Church (1831~1890)
Front Organized in 1829, Christ Church was Nashville's first Episcopal parish. The present Victorian Gothic church designed by Francis Hatch Kimball of New York, opened for service on Dec. 16, 1894; the tower , by local architect Russell E. . . . — Map (db m81433) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 197 — Citizens Savings Bank and Trust Company
(Obverse) Citizens Savings Bank and Trust Company is the oldest, continuously operated African-American bank in the United States. Formerly known as the One-Cent Savings Bank and Trust Company and organized for the uplift of African . . . — Map (db m81434) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 35 — City Cemetery
First established in 1822, the remains of many early settlers were then brought here for permanent burial. Among the more than 20,000 persons buried here are Gen. James Robertson, Gov. William Carroll, Sec. of Treasury George W. Campbell, Lt. Gen. . . . — Map (db m74357) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A-36 — Cockrill Spring
The house of John Cockrill, an early settler, stood about 60 yards north, near a large spring, whose waters ran northeast into Lick Branch, which emptied Great Salt Lick, around which Nashville was founded. A blacksmith shop stood under the great . . . — Map (db m12765) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Colonel James Robertson
In honor of Colonel James Robertson Born 1742 in Virginia Died 1814 in Tennessee He came from eastern North Carolina to the Watauga Settlement in what is now eastern Tennessee 1769-1770, where he was a leader in Civil and Indian . . . — Map (db m24240) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Colonel John Donelson
In appreciation of the services of Colonel John Donelson Born in Delaware, 1718. Died in Kentucky 1786. Distinguished in early life in Virginia as a civil, industrial and military leader. Member of the House of Burgesses, iron . . . — Map (db m59376) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Colonel Richard HendersonFounder and Promoter of the noted "Transylvania Land Company"
In recognition of Colonel Richard Henderson Born in Virginia 1735 Died in North Carolina 1785 ————— Founder and Promoter of the noted "Transylvania Land Company" Whose purchase from the Cherokee . . . — Map (db m24373) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 144 — Confederate Circle at Mount Olivet
After the War Between the States, the women of Nashville bought land at Mount Olivet, and formed Confederate Circle. The remains of about 1,500 Confederate soldiers were moved here from area battlefields. Seven Confederate generals were buried in or . . . — Map (db m76477) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 14 — Confederate DefensesDec. 15, 1864
After being outflanked by the advance of the Federal XVI Corps (Smith), Loring and Walthall put their divisions in a defensive line west of this road, facing westward. Here, their determined defense brought Federal advances against the Confederate . . . — Map (db m53348) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 154 — Cravath Hall
This neo-Gothic structure first served as the Erastus M. Cravath Memorial Library. Named for Cravath, the university's first president (1875-1900), it was designed by Nashville architect Henry Hibbs and built in 1929-30. The interior walls depict . . . — Map (db m4502) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Customs House
President Rutherford B. Hayes laid its cornerstone in 1877. Designed by Treasury Department architect W.A. Potter, it was occupied in 1882 by collectors of customs and internal revenue, U.S. courts, and Nashville's main post office. Addition to rear . . . — Map (db m83847) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 138 — DeFord Bailey1899-1982
Bailey, a pioneer of the Grand Old Opry and its first black musician, lived in the Edgehill neighborhood for nearly 60 years. His shoe-shine shop was on 12th Ave., South, near this intersection. His harmonica performance of the "Pan American Blues" . . . — Map (db m74369) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 32 — Demonbreum's Cave
Jaques-Timothe De Montbrun, French Canadian fur trader and later lieutenant governor of the Illinois Country, visited in this area as early as 1769. On at least one occasion he took refuge in the cave 0.9 mile N. when attacked by Indians. He settled . . . — Map (db m83845) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 157 — Desegregating Nashville's Lunch Counters
After the pre-dawn bombing of atty. Z. Alexander Looby's home, approx. 3000 civil rights leaders and students from Tenn. St., Fisk, Meharry, American Baptist College, and Pearl High School marched along this route on April 19, 1960, to meet with . . . — Map (db m4226) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 71 — Disciples of Christ Historical Society
Library and archives of the 19th c. American religious unity movement which became: the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ); Christian Churches; and Churches of Christ. Located here, 1958, in the Thomas W. Phillips Memorial. Architects: Hoffman & . . . — Map (db m52367) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 181 — Donley Harold Turpin, D. D. S.
1892-1948 Turpin, a 1918 alumnus, was appointed Professor in 1937 and acting dean of the Dental School in 1938. Attesting to his profound devotion to Meharry's School of Dentistry, which was founded in 1886, Turpin gave his personal finances to . . . — Map (db m4225) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 78 — Downtown Presbyterian Church
From 1814 to 1955 this was the site of the First Presbyterian Church. President Andrew Jackson was received into the church in 1838. James K. Polk was inaugurated governor here in 1839. The building designed in the Egyptian style by William . . . — Map (db m24071) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 173 — Dr. Harold Dadford West, Sr.
1904-1974 In 1927, Dr. West came to Meharry Medical College as Associate Professor of Chemistry. A 1930 Julius Rosenwald Fellowship Recipient and a 1935 Fellow of the General Education Board, he returned to Meharry to serve as the first Ph. D . . . — Map (db m4519) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 132 — Dry-Stack Stone Walls
Dry-stack stone walls, a Scots-Irish building tradition adapted by slaves in the early 19th century, were common throughout middle Tennessee. During the 1864 Battle of Nashville, Brigadier General Henry Jackson was captured at this wall on the . . . — Map (db m53354) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 105 — Duncan College Preparatory School for Boys
Marvin T. Duncan, a graduate of Webb School (Bell Buckle) and Vanderbilt University, founded Duncan School in 1908 at this site on 25th Avenue S. He and his wife, Pauline, taught at the school until it closed in 1952. The Duncans dedicated their . . . — Map (db m52171) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 128 — Dutchman’s Curve Train Wreck
The deadliest train wreck in US history occurred on July 9, 1918, when two crowded trains collided head-on at Dutchman’s Curve. The impact caused passenger cars to derail into surrounding cornfields, and fires broke out throughout the wreckage. Over . . . — Map (db m52596) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 88 — Edmondson Home Site
Will Edmondson, born about 1883 of former slave parents in the Hillsboro area of Davidson County, worked as a railroad and hospital laborer until 1931, when he began his primitive limestone carvings. Working without formal training, he produced some . . . — Map (db m52713) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 142 — Ella Sheppard (Moore)1851 - 1914
Ella Sheppard, an original Fisk Jubilee Singer, lecturer and teacher, was born on February 4, 1851. She entered Fisk in 1868, and was selected to join the group of nine singers that set out on October 6, 1871 to raise funds to save the school. She . . . — Map (db m62508) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 13 — Federal DefensesDec. 2-15, 1864
Near here, the interior defensive lines ran southwest to cross Harding Pike; the total length of these works was about 7 miles. First garrisoned by Wood's IV Corps, it was occupied Dec. 15 by Donaldson's Division of Quarter-master employees. Part of . . . — Map (db m52145) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N-13 — Federal Defenses
The hill to the west was a strong point in the system of permanent Federal defenses, started in 1862, which extended to the river on both sides of town. Artillery was emplaced here from time to time. — Map (db m61935) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Felix K. Zollicoffer
Ante-bellum newspaper editor and Brigadier General in Confederate Army. Killed at battle of Fishing Creek, Kentucky, January 19, 1862. He was first Confederate general killed in the West. — Map (db m86365) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 31 — First Airfield
E. L. Hampton's pasture became “Hampton Field” when transient airplanes began landing here during the first World War. About 2,000 feet long from here west, bounded north and south by Golf Club Lane and Woodmont Boulevard, it continued . . . — Map (db m53379) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 125 — First Baptist Church
Organized in 1820, this is the church's third downtown location. The elaborate Gothic tower is all that remains of the Matthews & Thompson building that stood at this location from 1886 to 1967. The Baptist Sunday School Board, now one of the . . . — Map (db m24141) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 186 — First Masonic Hall
Across the alley stood the first Masonic Hall in the state, designed by architect Hugh Roland in 1818. Marquis de la Fayette was entertained there in 1825 by Past Grand Master Andrew Jackson. The 17th General Assembly of Tennessee met there in 1827. . . . — Map (db m81437) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — No. 41 — First Steam Locomotive
On Dec. 13, 1850, the first steam engine, Tennessee No. 1, ordered by the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, arrived on the steamboat "Beauty" from Cincinnati. The one-mile trip on improvised tracks from the wharf to the S. Cherry St. crossing . . . — Map (db m74361) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 119 — Fisk Memorial Chapel
Fisk Memorial Chapel, deigned by New York architect William Bigelow, was erected in 1892 in memory of General Clinton B. Fisk, a founder of the University. The religious and cultural center of the campus, the Chapel has welcomed foreign dignitaries, . . . — Map (db m4268) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 96 — Fisk University
Fisk University, founded in 1866 by the American Missionary Association, was chartered in 1867 to provide higher education for men and women regardless of race. Named for General Clinton B. Fisk, assistant commissioner of the Freedman's Bureau for . . . — Map (db m4510) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Fort Nashborough
Named in memory of General Nash of North Carolina, who fell at Germantown, Pennsylvania, October 4, 1777, in the War of the Revolution. Erected on the bluff near this location by the pioneers of the Cumberland settlement in the year 1780, as a . . . — Map (db m24303) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 33 — Fort Nashborough
The original stockade fronted on the river slightly north of here, covering an area of about two acres. In that enclosure, on May 13, 1780, representatives of this and other settlements met and adopted the Cumberland Compact for the government of . . . — Map (db m81452) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Fort NegleyDefending the Capital — Hood's Campaign
In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman’s supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman’s “March to the Sea,” Hood . . . — Map (db m74349) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 55 — Fort Negley Site
The guns of Fort Negley, commanding three turnpikes to the South & Southeast, opened the Battle of Nashville, Dec. 15, 1864. This site was selected by Capt. J. S. Morton as the key strongpoint in the Federal line around the city. The European style . . . — Map (db m30054) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Founding of Altrusa International
To commemorate its founding on April 11, 1917, Altrusa International, Inc. planted seventy-five flowering dogwood trees on this site as a 75th anniversary gift to the people of Nashville and the state of Tennessee. — Map (db m85483) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Founding of Nashville
On Monday, April 24, 1780, two pioneers, James Robertson and John Donelson, shook hands upon the completion of a reunion at the site on which you now stand. Each man, one by land, the other by water, played out his part in a two-fold plan for a new . . . — Map (db m81453) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Founding of the United Daughters of the Confederacy
United Daughters of the Confederacy 10 September 1894 10 September 1969 This memorial commemorates the seventy-fifth anniversary of the foundation of The United Daughters of the Confederacy by Caroline Meriwether Goodlett in . . . — Map (db m85486) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Fourth and Church
Once Cherry and Spring Street, later Cherry and Church, is rich in Nashville history. Near here, April 2, 1781, Charlotte Reeves Robertson, wife of Colonel James Robertson, turned the pioneers' dogs loose on raiding Indians during the "Battle of the . . . — Map (db m24140) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 42 — Freeland's Station
On this site stood one of the principal stations of the Cumberland Settlements. Felix Robertson, son of Col. James Robertson and the first white child born in the Settlement, was born here, Jan. 11, 1781. On Jan. 15 the fort was heavily attacked by . . . — Map (db m4131) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Gen. Sam G. Smith
1794-1835 Jackson County attorney; aide-de-camp, General Carroll, at New Orleans, 1815; State Senator, 1827-29; Bank Commissioner, 1829; Secretary of State for Tennessee, 1831-35. His motto: Office has no charms to . . . — Map (db m89318) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 114 — Germantown Historic District
European immigrants esablished Germantown, the first suburb in North Nashville, in the 1850s. Large bick townhouses stood next to modest workers' cottages, illustrating the area's economic and social diversity. World War I and changes in public . . . — Map (db m4518) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 109 — Governors' Mansion
A residence built on this site in 1910 served as the residence of the governors of Tennessee from 1921 until 1949, when a residence on Curtiswood Lane was acquired by the state. Governors who lived here were Alfred Taylor, Austin Peay, Henry Horton, . . . — Map (db m52331) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 14 — Granbury’s Lunette
Lunette at extreme right of Confederate Infantry (Cheatham) to Dec. 15. 1864. This place was attacked Dec. 15. 1864 by Steedman (Under whom were Grosvenor, Shafter and Corbin) who retreated north and east with heavy losses. — Map (db m86363) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 28 — Granny White Grave
Grave of Lucinda "Granny" White, who settled here in 1803 on 50 acres of land. She died in 1815 at about age 73. Granny White Tavern stood 200' to the north. Famous for its food, brandy, and comfortable beds, it attracted travelers from the Natchez . . . — Map (db m95832) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 182 — Griggs Hall
Built in 1925, Griggs Hall is the original building on the American Baptist Theological Seminary campus, now American Baptist College. It was named for father and son, Drs. Allen R. and Sutton E. Griggs. In 1901, the younger Griggs founded and . . . — Map (db m3305) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 151 — Hadley Park
In 1912, Nashville officials purchased 34 acres of land to provide a public park for Negro citizens. Originally a part of the John L. Hadley plantation, Hadley Park was dedicated on July 4th. It is considered the first public park in the United . . . — Map (db m4221) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — No. 1 — Heaton's Station
On his bluff in 1780, pioneers who came with James Robertson built Heaton's (also spelled Eaton's) station. It and two other forts (Nashborough and Freeland's) withstood all Indian attacks and saved the Cumberland settlements. On the river below . . . — Map (db m74331) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 149 — Hillsboro Theater
In 1925, the Hillsboro Theater opened as a silent film house with its entrance on 21st Avenue South. The stage arch was decorated by Italian craftsman, Raffaelo Mattei. It was the home of the Children's Theatre of Nashville after 1931, the Grand Ole . . . — Map (db m52173) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 34 — Hillsboro Toll GateNo. 1
Ten yds. north stood toll gate and toll gate house erected by Nashville and Hillsboro Turnpike Co., Incorporated in 1848. Charges to travel macadamized road could not exceed: horse or mule, 3 cents; 10 sheep, 20 cents; 20 meat cattle, 25 cents; . . . — Map (db m81454) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 148 — Hillsboro-West End
This classic streetcar suburb was developed on farm land as Nashville grew south and west in the late nineteenth century. Built in Bungalow, Tudor, and Colonial Revival styles, many homes from the 1910s and 1920s still stand. The Hillsboro-West End . . . — Map (db m52170) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A74 — Holy Rosary Cathedral
Near here in 1820 the first Catholic Church in Tennessee was built by Irish Catholic workers then building a bridge over Cumberland River. In 1830 a brick structure known as Holy Rosary Cathedral succeeded the frame building. Here Bishop R. P. . . . — Map (db m36240) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 9 — Holy Trinity Episcopal Church
This building, renowned for its pure Gothic architecture and harmony of proportions, was designed by Wills & Dudley of New York, in a style suggesting an English village church. The cornerstone was laid May 7, 1852, by Bishop James Otey. The church . . . — Map (db m81455) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 117 — Homes of David Lipscomb
This cabin was home, periodically, up to 1882 of educator, editor, and religious leader David Lipscomb and wife, Margaret Zellner Lipscomb. The Associated Ladies for Lipscomb moved it here from Bell's Bend in 1985. In 1903 the Lipscombs built . . . — Map (db m53347) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 152 — Hulda Margaret Lyttle
1889-1983 In 1913, Hulda M. Lyttle was one of three graduates in the first nursing education class of Meharry's G. W. Hubbard Hospital. In 1916, Lyttle returned to Meharry as Director of Nurse Training. Between 1921 and 1938, she served as . . . — Map (db m4223) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 152 — Jack Clement Recording Studios
After success in Memphis with Sun Records, "Cowboy" Jack Clement founded Jack Clement Recording Studios in 1969, producing and writing for artists such as Johnny Cash and Charley Pride. It was the first facility of its kind in Nashville, with . . . — Map (db m76355) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 98 — Jackson's Law Office
Andrew Jackson settled in Nashville in 1788 and served as Atty. Gen. until 1796. Lawyer John Overton owned a building here (1791-96) and shared office space with his friend Jackson. Jackson was Tennessee's first Rep. to Congress (1796) and state . . . — Map (db m24084) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Jacques Timothe Boucher de Montbrun(Timothy Demonbreun) — 1747 - 1826
French Canadian fur trader and explorer Officer of the American Revolution Lieutenant Governor of the Illinois Territory Honored as Nashville's "First Citizen" Sculptor: Alan Lequire Plaque donated in memory of: Dr. Truman Weldon . . . — Map (db m81456) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 26 — James K. Polk
The house which stood about 100 feet west was built in 1815 by Felix Grundy. James K. Polk bought it while President in 1847. He came home to it on expiration of his term of office and died here, June 15, 1849. His widow occupied it until her death . . . — Map (db m74337) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 141 — James Weldon Johnson Home
This Dutch Colonial house was built in 1931 for James Weldon Johnson. He served as U.S. Consul to Venezuela and Nicaragua, editor of the New York Age, and field secretary of the NAACP. Johnson's poem, "Lift Every Voice and Sing," set to music by his . . . — Map (db m4520) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 38 — John Trotwood Moore1858-1929
Tennessee novelist, poet, co-author, four-volume history, “Tennessee, the Volunteer State”; publisher, “Trotwood Monthly”; author of short stories; breeder & judge of livestock; teacher, lecturer; beloved companion & . . . — Map (db m53350) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — John W. Thomas1830 - 1906
A native of Nashville. Forty-eight years in the service of the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway; President for twenty-two years. President of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition, which resulted in securing to Nashville this . . . — Map (db m62864) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 18 — Johnson's Station
A double log house and a few log cabins, partially picketed, stood here about 1790. On May 9, 1793, 4 children on their way to the spring were attacked by Indians. Three were scalped and killed. One escaped. The home of Charles Bosley, wealthy . . . — Map (db m53362) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 120 — Jubilee Hall
Erected in 1876, Jubilee Hall was the first permanent structure built on the Fisk University campus. Named for Fisk's world-famous Jubilee Singers, this Victorian Gothic structure is sometimes called "frozen music." Jubilee Hall is a National . . . — Map (db m4148) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 103 — Julia McClung Green1873-1961
Dedicated educator who served Davidson County public schools 57 years as a teacher, the first Supervisor of Elementary Education 1911-1944, and Director of Character Education, Miss Julia oversaw schools countywide. A progressive, she pioneered . . . — Map (db m53385) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Lieutenant James Simmons Timothy
This tree was planted May 24th 1919 by the Catholic Children of Nashville in grateful memory of Lieutenant James Simmons Timothy of the 80th Company, 6th Regiment U.S.M.C.who was killed in action at Belleau Wood, France, June 14th 1918, aged 25 . . . — Map (db m59185) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 86 — Luke Lea Heights5 miles ahead on Scenic Drive
Luke Lea (1879-1945) envisioned this park, gave to the city in 1927 the original 868 acres, and asked that the land be named for his father-in-law, Percy Warner. Founder of the Nashville Tennessean, Lea was a key developer of Belle Meade, a U.S. . . . — Map (db m68993) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Major Henry M. Rutledge
Only son of Edward Rutledge, signer of the Declaration of Independence. He married the daughter of Arthur Middleton, another signer of the Declaration. — Map (db m89317) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 52 — Major Wilbur Fisk Foster1834-1922
Chief Engr. Army of Tenn. C.S.A.; Construction Engineer on first R.R. Bridge in Nashville; City Engineer of Nashville and Member of American Society of civil Engineers; Director of Works at the Tennessee Centennial Exposition, 1897 & Co-Founder of . . . — Map (db m4142) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 26 — Marathon Motor Car
The Marathon Motor Car was manufactured here 1914-1916 by Southern Motor Works (later called Marathon). Four models, all touring cars, were powered by engines of 4 cylinders, 30/35 hp, & 6s of 50 hp, with wheelbases from 9'8" to 12'5". The plant . . . — Map (db m61654) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 77 — Maxwell House Hotel
On this site stood the Maxwell House Hotel built by John Overton in 1859. It was destroyed by fire on Christmas Day, 1961. After wartime use as a barracks, hospital and prison, it was formally opened as a hotel in 1869. Presidents Andrew Johnson, . . . — Map (db m24145) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 19 — Meharry Medical College
Meharry Medical College, established in 1876 through the efforts of Dr. George W. Hubbard, Dr. Willliam J. Sneed, and Samuel Meharry, is the only AMA accredited, privately endowed, predominantly Negro medical school in the world. During its first 90 . . . — Map (db m5506) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Minnesota
On Shy's Hill on December 16, 1864 Minnesota troops made what historians call the "Decisive Charge in the Decisive Battle of the Civil War" that led to the destruction of the Confederate army of Tennessee. The 5th, 7th, 9th, and 10th Minnesota . . . — Map (db m87557) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Montgomery Bell Academy
Formally established in 1867 with a bequest of $20,000 by ironmaster Montgomery Bell, the roots of M.B.A. actually go back to 1785, with the University of Nashville, Cumberland College, and Davidson Academy. The boy's preparatory school has been . . . — Map (db m53364) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 61 — Nashville Academy of Medicine
The Nashville Medical Society, the first medical association in Tennessee, was founded March 5, 1821, by 7 physicians in the log courthouse on the Public Square. Pres. was Dr. Felix Robertson, first white child born in Nashville. Chartered Sept. 4, . . . — Map (db m4522) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 61 — Nashville Academy of Medicine
The Nashville Medical Society, the first medical association in Tennessee, was founded March 5, 1821, by 7 physicians in the log courthouse on the Public Square. Pres. was Dr. Felix Robertson, first white child born in Nashville. Chartered Sept. 4, . . . — Map (db m55018) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 132 — Nashville Blacks in the Civil War
From October - December 1862, on this hill, black laborers helped the Union Army build Fort Negley. In November, blacks helped defend the unfinished fort against Confederate attack. During the Battle of Nashville (December 1864), nearly 13,000 black . . . — Map (db m41483) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 14 — Nashville Centennial1780~1880
The Centennial Exposition on this site in 1880 from April 23 through May 30, marked a century of progress since the founding of Nashville. There were parades, oratory, music; historical, art and commercial exhibits; theatrical performances, and . . . — Map (db m28467) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — No. 4 — Nashville Plow Works
Site of a farm implement factory operated by Messrs. Sharp and Hamilton, previous to the War Between the States. With the outbreak of hostilities they reversed the Biblical injunction and produced swords of excellent quality for the Confederacy. . . . — Map (db m74348) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — No. 87 — Nashville Sit-Ins
Formerly located at his site was First Baptist Church, Capitol Hill, headquarters of the 1960s Sit-In Movement, led by Rev. Kelly Miller Smith. Strategy sessions, non-violence workshops, mass meetings, victory celebrations, and administrative . . . — Map (db m74333) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 12 — Nashville's First Public School
Nashville's first public school, Hume School, opened here Feb. 26, 1855. A three story brick building, the school employed 12 teachers and served all grades. In 1874 high school classes were moved to Fogg School built on adjoining corner lot. Named . . . — Map (db m28468) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 101 — Nashville's First Radio Station
June 1922, Boy Scout John H. DeWitt, Jr., started Nashville's first radio station (WDAA) on the Ward-Belmont Campus. Assisted by music teacher G. S. deLuca, he broadcast Enrico Caruso records to the opening of the River and Rail Terminal on the . . . — Map (db m52306) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Old Harding Pike
When Lewis DeMoss first settled less than a mile here around 1800, there was an old north-south trail across this river bottom, which is still known by many as DeMoss Bottom. It was one of several approaches to the northern end of what in the 1700s . . . — Map (db m102885) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 147 — Pearl High School
(Obverse) Named for Joshua F. Pearl, the city's first superintendent of schools, Pearl was established in 1883 as a grammar school for Negroes and was located on old South Summer Street. It became a high school in 1897 when grades 9 thru 11 . . . — Map (db m4988) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Percy Warner Park2058.1 acres
Percy Warner (1861-1927) was a pioneer in electric utilities and hydroelectric development in the South. As chairman of the Park Board, he expanded Nashville’s park system. Preservation of this natural area was one of his greatest civic projects. . . . — Map (db m68992) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 15 — Powder Grinding Wheels
These wheels used by the Confederacy to grind gunpowder at Augusta, Ga in 1863-1864 were made in Woolwich, England and were shipped on the blockade runner "Spray," via Mobile. After the war Gen. Miles purchased them for use at Sycamore Powder Mills, . . . — Map (db m4144) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 120 — Randall Jarrel1914~1965
Distinguished poet, critic, novelist, and teacher. Born in Nashville; Hume~Fogg graduated 1931; Vanderbilt bachelor's and master's degrees. Served in U.S. Army Air Corps in WWII. Wrote about losses of war and childhood innocence. Poet Laureate . . . — Map (db m81462) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 141 — RCA Studio B
RCA Records established a recording studio in this building in Novemeber 1957, with local offices run by guitarist-producer Chet Atkins. Its success led to a larger studio, known as Studio A, built next door in 1964. Studio B recorded numerous hits . . . — Map (db m81463) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Remnants of the University of Nashville
These Ionic column capitals once adorned the Cumberland College building constructed in 1806 just south of downtown Nashville. Originally founded in December 1785 as Davidson Academy (the nation's 15th college), Cumberland's charter was altered in . . . — Map (db m54250) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Richard S. EwellDied 1872
Lieutenant General in Confederate Army, commanding a corps in Robert e. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. After the war lived on farm at Ewell's Station (Spring Hill), Tennessee. — Map (db m86364) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 143 — Richardson House
This house, listed in the National Register of Historic Places, was built in 1905 as the home of Reuben B. and Mary Knowles Richardson. Richardson, who served as Capt. of Eng. Co. No.4 from 1893 to 1923, was one of the first Blacks to obtain this . . . — Map (db m4513) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 28 — Richland
1.2 mile NE James Robertson built his cabin in 1779 at 23rd and Park. In October 1784 Robertson moved to his Richland Creek farm, living in the log structure until 1787, when the first brick house in Middle Tennessee was completed. Called . . . — Map (db m59591) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 133 — Richland-West End
This early planned subdivision presents a largely unaltered picture of suburban residences in early 20th century Nashville. With ninety percent of existing homes built between 1905 and 1925, the styles range from large American four-squares to the . . . — Map (db m53381) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 128 — Roger Williams University
The Nashville Institute, renamed Roger Williams University, was located on a 28 acre campus next to Hillsboro Pike from 1874 to 1905. It was the largest of the Baptist schools for African-Americans, influencing many important educators and leaders. . . . — Map (db m28417) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 47 — Saint Cecilia Academy
The name Saint Cecilia, patroness of music was chosen for a grammar and high school for girls, opened in October 1860 by four Sisters who had moved to this site from Saint Mary's Convent, Third Order of Saint Dominic, Somerset, Ohio on August 17, . . . — Map (db m4098) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 102 — Saint Thomas Hospital
On April 11, 1898, at the request of Nashville Bishop Thomas Byrne, the Daughters of Charity opened St. Thomas Hospital on this site in the former home of Judge J.M. Dickinson. Named for Byrne's patron saint, the hospital began as a 26-bed "refuge . . . — Map (db m81464) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 130 — Sampson W. Keeble
Sampson W. Keeble, barber, businessman, and civic leader, became the first African-American to serve in the Tennessee General Assembly. Serving from 1873 to 1875, Keeble was appointed to the House Military Affairs Committee and the Immigration . . . — Map (db m24220) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 163 — Samuel Allen McElwee1858 -1914
Born a slave in Madison County, Samuel McElwee began teaching school in Haywood County at the age of 16. In 1882, he was elected to the Tennessee House of Representatives and one year later was graduated from Fisk University. The only African . . . — Map (db m81465) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 139 — Sarah Estell
Sarah Estell, a free black woman in the slavery era, ran an ice cream parlor and sweet shop near here. She overcame the many hurdles faced by free persons of color, and her venture thrived. Her catering firm met the banquet needs of the city's . . . — Map (db m81470) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 145 — Scarritt College for Christian Workers
Established in Kansas City in 1892 by the Methodist Episcopal Church South and moved to Nashville in 1924, Scarritt trained laity in Christian education, music, and missions until it closed in 1988. Much of the Collegiate Gothic campus architecture . . . — Map (db m60196) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 16 — Schofield's Jump-Off LineDec. 15, 1864
The Federal defensive line ran northeast and southwest through here. It was garrisoned by Schofield's Corps on arrival here after the Battle of Franklin, Dec 2, and later became a line of departure for the advance into support positions: Cruft's . . . — Map (db m53343) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3 — Site of First Store
Lardner Clark came from Philadelphia in the early 1780's with ten horses packed with piece goods, needles and pins. He established Nashville's first drygoods store by 1786, on a site 30 yards east. The building, which served as store, tavern and . . . — Map (db m61938) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — No. 39 — Site of Original Gas Works
The Nashville Gas Light Co., founded Mar. 1850, with General Washington Barrow, President, built first gas works in Tennessee for manufacturing gas from coal. First street lamp was lighted Feb. 13, 1851 at Second Ave. North and Public Square. . . . — Map (db m74334) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — No. 91 — St. Patrick Catholic Church
Erected in 1890 and named for Ireland's patron saint, this Second Empire style church was built to serve South Nashville's growing Irish Catholic population. Until 1954, the Sisters of Mercy taught a grade school here. Since the 1890s, the Irish . . . — Map (db m74367) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 118 — Sunnyside
Home of Mary Benton, widow of Jesse Benton who left Nashville after a famous feud with Andrew Jackson in 1813. The Greek Revival house was built c. 1852 and stood between Union and Confederate lines during the Battle of Nashville in 1864. Prominent . . . — Map (db m52851) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 155 — Talley-Brady Hall
Talley-Brady Hall was named for well-known African-American chemists Thomas Talley and Saint Elmo Brady, both graduates of Fisk University. Talley was chairman of the chemistry department from 1902 to 1927. In 1916 Saint Elmo Brady was one of the . . . — Map (db m4503) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 88 — Tennessee Ornithological Society
On October 7, 1915, Dr. George Curtis, Albert F. Ganier, Judge H.Y. Hughes, Dr. George R. Mayfield, Dixon Merritt, and A.C. Webb met at Faucon's Restaurant, 419 Union Street, approximately 50 feet east of here, to found the Tennessee Ornithological . . . — Map (db m61939) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 34 — Tennessee State Capitol
Designed by William Strickland, noted Philadelphia architect who also designed the tower of Independence Hall. Construction was commenced in 1845 and completed 1859. Strickland died in 1854 and is entombed in the north portico. His son Francis, . . . — Map (db m36112) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 124 — Tennessee State University
Established in 1912 for the education of Negro citizens, Tennessee State University merged with UT-Nashville in 1979 and has become a major comprehensive urban university. Development from normal school to university progressed as follows: Tenn. A & . . . — Map (db m5512) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 137 — The Craighead House
This Federal-style home was built c1810 for John Brown Craighead and his first wife Jane Erwin Dickinson. Craighead was the son of early Nashville settler the Rev. Thomas Craighead. In 1823, Craighead married Lavinia Robertson Beck, youngest . . . — Map (db m53382) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 111 — The Harpeth Hall School
On Sept. 17, 1951, Harpeth Hall opened as an independent girls' college preparatory school on the former P.M. Estes estate. Susan Souby headed the first school of 161 girls. Originating with Ward Seminary (1865-1913); Belmont College for Young Women . . . — Map (db m81471) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 145 — The Harris Music Building
This Italianate structure was built ca. 1876 as the home of Richard Harris, an entrepreneur and owner of Harris Furniture Co. In the late 1880s, he became the first Black trustee of Fisk University. W.G. Waterman, a Fisk professor, became owner of . . . — Map (db m4501) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 159 — The John Wesley Work Home
(Obverse): In 1937 this Victorian-style house became the home of John W. Work III. A teacher and composer for 39 years, he served his alma mater by enriching the Fisk musical traditions. Director of the Jubilee Singers, Work III, a serious . . . — Map (db m5509) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 121 — The Little Theatre
The Little Theatre, circa 1860, is the oldest structure on the Fisk University campus. Erected as part of a Union Army hospital barracks during the Civil War, it was known as the "Railroad Hospital." The interior was remodeled for use as the Fisk . . . — Map (db m4506) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — The Nashville Parthenon1897-1988
The Nashville Parthenon was built on this site as the centerpiece of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition of 1897. The original full-scale replica was intended as a temporary exhibit structure and was constructed of brick, wood and plaster. The . . . — Map (db m40430) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — The Natchez TraceBelle Meade Plantation
In 1742 a European settler recorded his travel and the conditions of the path which was known as the Natchez Trace. This is the earliest known recording of the trace, a portion of which was located on the site of Belle Meade Plantation. The trace, . . . — Map (db m81472) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 93 — The Parthenon
Erected as the central structure of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition, 1897, this is the only full-scale reproduction of the fifth century B.C. Athenian temple and is exact in almost every detail to the original. The idea of reproducing the . . . — Map (db m4152) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — The Parthenon
The world’s only replica of the Parthenon, epitome of Greek culture, was the central building at Tennessee’s Centennial Exposition, May 1 thru October 31, 1897. The original temple, dedicated to Athena, Greek Goddess of Wisdom occupied the most . . . — Map (db m81477) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 135 — The Seeing EyeIndependence and Dignity Since 1929
The Seeing Eye, the world-famous dog guide training school, was incorporated in Nashville January 29, 1929, with headquarters in the Fourth and First National Bank Building at 315 Union St. Morris Frank, a 20-year-old blind man from Nashville, and . . . — Map (db m61940) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — The South Field
Also called The Commons, originally 240 acres extending south to the river. Given to Davidson Academy by the State of North Carolina, famous as a mustering ground. Here 4,000 Tennessee Militia were reviewed by Andrew Jackson and Lafayette on the . . . — Map (db m84200) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — No. 119 — The Temple Cemetery
The Temple Cemetery was established in 1851 with the purchase of three acres by the Hebrew Benevolent Burial Association and still serves Nashville's first Jewish congregation, The Temple, Congregation Ohabal Sholom. It blends early urban burial . . . — Map (db m74332) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 179 — Theodore "Ted" Rhodes
November 9, 1913 - July 4, 1969 Recognized as the first African-American professional golfer, Theodore "Ted" Rhodes, a native of Nashville, competed on the United Golf Association Tour. A predominately black tour, Rhodes won 150 tournaments from . . . — Map (db m4099) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Thomas Green Ryman1841 - 1904
A prominent riverboat captain and Nashville businessman, Thomas Ryman was known for his generous contributions of time and money to the construction of the Union Gospel Tavernacle. In 1904, the Tabernacle was renamed the Ryman Auditorium in his . . . — Map (db m61941) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 137 — Thomas W. Talley
Recognized during his lifetime primarily as a chemist, teacher, and administrator at Fisk University, Thomas W. Talley (1870- 1952) was also Tennessee's first African-American folklorist. A native of Bedford County, he began collecting folk songs . . . — Map (db m5507) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 198 — Tom Wilson Park1929-1946
Formerly located near this site was Tom Wilson Park. It opened in 1929 and was home to the Nashville Elite Giants baseball team of the Southern Negro League. Owned by Thomas T. Wilson, the facility was one of two African-American owned professional . . . — Map (db m81478) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Tomb of James Knox PolkJames Knox Polk, — President of the U.S. Born Nov. 2, 1795, Died June 15, 1849.
The mortal remains of James Knox Polk are resting in the vault beneath. He was born in MecKlenburg County North Carolina and emigrated with his father Samuel Polk to Tennesee in 1806. The beauty of virtue was illustrated in . . . — Map (db m85552) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Travellers Rest"The proudest moment of my life" — Hood's Campaign
In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman’s supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman’s “March to the Sea,” Hood . . . — Map (db m74373) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 30 — Travellers' Rest
The first part of this house was built in 1799 by Judge John Overton, one time Revenue Collector for the Mero District of North Carolina, later member of the Tennessee Supreme Court and longtime friend of Andrew Jackson. These two with General James . . . — Map (db m25652) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 70 — United Nations Visit To Nashville
On June 7, 1976, 101 permanent representatives of the United Nations made a historic and unprecedented group visit to Nashville at the invitation of Tennessee Governor Ray Blanton and Nashville Mayor Richard Fulton. During the visit, the United . . . — Map (db m4141) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 90 — University School of Nashville
Founded in 1915 as the successor to The Winthrop Model School at the University of Nashville, Peabody Demonstration School was established at this site in 1925 to utilize the teacher training methods developed at George Peabody College for Teachers. . . . — Map (db m52366) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 51 — Vanderbilt University
An independent, privately supported university founded 1873 by Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt, New York shipping & railway magnate, who gave $1,000,000 to start the university & expressed his wish that it should "contribute to strengthening the ties . . . — Map (db m25435) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 51 — Vauxhall Garden Site
Located immediately south, this fashionable place of entertainment was established by Messrs. Decker & Dyer in 1827 and operated for more than a decade. It covered several acres & included a ballroom, dining hall and miniature railroad. Pres. . . . — Map (db m61661) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 94 — Votes for Women
On August 18, 1920, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, thereby giving all American women the right to vote. After weeks of intense lobbying by national leaders, Tennessee passed the measure by one . . . — Map (db m52369) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 43 — Wallace University School1886 - 1941
To prepare young men for College & for life, believing the first object of education to develop character, the second to develop intellect, third to make Christian gentlemen, Wallace University School, directed by Professor Clarence B. Wallace, . . . — Map (db m25067) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — War on the Home FrontBelle Meade and Union Occupation
William Giles Harding, the owner of Belle Meade Plantation, was an ardent Confederate supporter who provided thousands of dollars to help arm Tennessee’s Confederate forces. He served on the state’s Military Armaments Committee. In March 1862, he . . . — Map (db m81481) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 206 — Ward-Belmont College1913-1951
In 1913, Belmont College (est. 1890) and Ward's Seminary (est. 1865) merged to form Ward-Belmont College, a women's junior college, preparatory school, and music conservatory on Adelicia Acklen's Belle Monte estate. It was the first junior college . . . — Map (db m52144) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 123 — Watkins Park
Land once known as Watkins Grove was given to the city in 1870 by brick maker and contractor Samuel Watkins. It served as a site for political gatherings, school commencements and concerts. This became Nashville's first public park in 1901. Park . . . — Map (db m4515) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 117 — West End High School
One of Nashville's best examples of Colonial Revival style, this building was designed by Donald Southgate and opened in 1937. Public Works Administration funds supported its construction during a major city school building project of the 1930s. . . . — Map (db m52598) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 106 — William Carroll
A native of Pennsylvania, William Carroll moved to Nashville in 1810. He became a successful merchant and hero of the War of 1812. William Carroll served longer as Governor, 12 years, than anyone else in the history of the state. Under his . . . — Map (db m39407) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 46 — William Driver
Born, 1803, in Salem Mass., and sea-captain at 21, he retired in 1837. Coming here for his wife's health, he brought with him the flag given him in 1832, which he had nicknamed "Old Glory," the first known use of the term. This flag was flown from . . . — Map (db m74346) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — William Driver
Captain of sea-going sailing vessels from Salem, Massachusetts, lived in Nashville in his later years. It was his flag, which he called "Old Glory," that was raised over the State Capitol when Federal troops captured Nashville in 1862. — Map (db m86366) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 35 — William Walker"Grey-eyed Man of Destiny"
Born May 8, 1824, Walker moved to this site from 6th Ave. N. in 1840. In early life he was a doctor, lawyer & journalist. He invaded Mexico in 1853 with 46 men & proclaimed himself Pres., Republic of Lower Calif. Led force into Nicaragua in 1855; . . . — Map (db m24067) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 104 — Woodmont Estates
Created in 1937 from the G. A. Puryear farm, it was once part of Samuel Watkin's country estate. Olmsted Bros. Landscape Architects designed the roads and lots to flow naturally with the hills, valleys, and brook. Residential development was made . . . — Map (db m53380) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N 15 — XVI Corps Line of Departure
Supported by a division of Wilson's cavalry, A. J. Smith's Corps moved westward astride Harding Rd, displacing Ector's Confederate Brigade from positions across the pike northward to the west of Richland Creek. This brigade out posted the . . . — Map (db m24170) HM

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